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What's Your Favorite Cut Of Steak?

Discussion in 'Swamp Cook Shack' started by WhattaGator, Mar 3, 2019.

  1. WhattaGator

    WhattaGator Ever Vigilant Psycho Mod Moderator VIP Member "Cook Shack Chef"

    I have rarely seen a restaurant that wouldn't advertise a Porterhouse as just that. If a restaurant wants to advertise a Porterhouse as a T-Bone, then they're using, as I previously stated the 1st or 2nd cuts of the T-Bone, which has a larger tenderloin, or, that's on them.

    Any reputable steakhouse is supposed to know their cuts of meat, and would never "cheapen" a good Porterhouse as a T-Bone

    Go to a good meat market, and your butcher will show you the difference.
     
  2. hawaiigator

    hawaiigator Junior

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    You’re the one who pasted the link showing that I’m right. The part about steakhouses are of no concern to me. I’d say the Department of Agriculture is a pretty reputable source for saying they are the same thing aside from the size of the filet......a large square and a small square both have 90* angles (filet) and 2 sides of parallel lines (Strip). At the end of the day that makeup gets you a square on both reguarless of size. A Tbone and a Porterhouse are the same steak, they have a filet, and a strip, the only difference is the size of the filet. We call it a porterhouse to distinguish that it has a bigger filet, but in reality, it’s just a big T-bone steak. You can argue it all you want, I’m inserting a victory beer into my Gator koozi as we speak while I hear up my grill
     
  3. ovillegator

    ovillegator Premium Member

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    My favorite. CHICKEN!

    Oh wait...

    I'm not off to a good start in this new forum...

    o_O
     
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  4. WhattaGator

    WhattaGator Ever Vigilant Psycho Mod Moderator VIP Member "Cook Shack Chef"

    With all due respect... kindly reread your post where you stated the part about restaurants and steakhouses calling a porterhouse a T-Bone.

    Also, it's a no-brainer that both have a T shaped bone that separates the strip from the tenderloin.
    You yourself acknowledged the difference in the size of the tenderloin in a T-Bone... as you get to the end of the T-Bone cuts, you'll find the minimum allowable tenderloin. If you go to a supermarket, some of their advertised T-Bones have almost no tenderloin.

    Also, the legnth of the bone that separates the two are longer in the T-Bone, and sometimes very short in the Porterhouse.

    Enjoy your beer! There's absolutely NO reason to pick nits... it's open to ALL cuts of steak.

    Anyone for a nice ribeye? That's my favorite cut!
     
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  5. hawaiigator

    hawaiigator Junior

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    I didn’t say that, that was what the website you hyperlinked said. None the less it’s just a friendly debate....I feel we can rival the Chip Kelly thread! ;) I couldn’t tell you what a reputable steakhouse does. I haven’t been to one ever, and really even unreputable ones since I was a kid lol. Why go out and let someone else cook deliciousness when you can do it yourself and hear that sizzle? The only one I do is Japanese steakhouses where I get a nice Wagyu strip. I’ll take that any day and twice on Sunday :emoji_yum:
     
  6. WhattaGator

    WhattaGator Ever Vigilant Psycho Mod Moderator VIP Member "Cook Shack Chef"

    The Wagyu beef is totally awesone, no matter the cut.
    The American version of Kobe beef, where the cattle get the "spa" treatment before heading to market.

    Has anyone had a very specialized cut of meat, s "steak" made exclusively from the "Cap" of ribeye?
    I had it twice when I used to go to Saratoga for the races in August. It's a rolled piece of ribeye cap, tied, and grilled like a steak.
    Anyone who enjoys a ribeye steak, or a nice slab of Prime Rib, knows the cap, or the outside part of the meat, is almost cut it with a spoon tender and juicy from the outside fat cap, and the marblinbg.

    The restaurant, "Salt and Char", is amazing, and the ribeye cap, called on the menu "American Wagyu Cap Steak", is about $78 for a 9 oz.
    Talk about a melt in your mouth, one of a kind prime cut of Wagyu beef!

    Dinner Menu - Salt & Char | Dinner In Saratoga Springs NY
     
  7. strulock

    strulock Senior

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    Chuck eye. Not a popular cut in most places, hard to find as well. Probably a cut off of one of the more popular steaks, I'm no expert so I don't know. But definitely one of the most flavorful and tender cuts you have ever tried.
    That said, any steak can be fantastic if the beef doesn't suck to begin with.
     
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  8. wjd

    wjd Premium Member

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    I don't even use a grill anymore for steaks. I saw Bobby Flay cooking them in a cast iron skillet, and I couldn't believe how good they turned out. Perfect sear and crust and can cook to any doneness!
     
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  9. AirGuard_Gator

    AirGuard_Gator I think there's a flaw in my code. VIP Member

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    Inspired I purchased two rib eyes to grill out tonight. I've decided to season with only Montreal and I'm probably going to have some roast asparagus with it. Of course I'm working on my second Old Rasmussin so theres an equal chance I may burn everything. Wish me luck!
     
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  10. luvtruthg8r

    luvtruthg8r Premium Member

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    I formerly owned an independent supermarket, and one of the specialties was meat. I also took some courses in the meat science department at UF, so i know a good bit on the subject.

    A chuck eye steak is from the section right next to the last cut of ribeye. It has some of the characteristics of a ribeye, but is fatter and tougher, although from excellent beef, can be fairly tender. It is very flavorful, like the rest of the chuck section. It looks somewhat like a ribeye. It's cheaper, and some in the industry refer to it as a "poor man's ribeye". Here is a photo of two:

    https://8e9d5b8b8dcb9208ef3f-01db2a...com/0231108000000_CF_hyvee_default_large.jpeg

    If you were to look at a bone in blade chuck roast (the first cut area, as opposed to the seven bone chuck roast, which lies next to it), the chuck eye would be cut from the bottom-right side of the following photo:

    https://food.unl.edu/image/image_gallery/uuid=4f24dc16-9ec4-4c45-87a6-d5aad7d5cedb&groupId=4089482&t=1283462337775

    The remaining boneless meat of the bone in blade chuck roast is then used for stew beef or is ground.
     
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  11. WhattaGator

    WhattaGator Ever Vigilant Psycho Mod Moderator VIP Member "Cook Shack Chef"

    A good, seasoned cast iron skillet is great for many uses... Steaks and burgers fet their great sear to seal in the juices. Salmon cooks very well in it too.
    What kind of burner do you have??? gas, electric, ceramic
    That 1st cut Bone-in blade Chuck used to be widely sold, expecially at a supermarket called Waldbaums, that operated in the Northeast.
    I was surprised as to how many people would push that aside to get to the 7-bone cut, even though, at that time, they were being sold for the same price.

    The 1st cut bone-in produced a great cut of meat, depending on the thickness, it could be grilled as a decent steak (after removing the outside piece of stew meat.... or, it would make one of the best roasts, because of the marbling.
     
  12. luvtruthg8r

    luvtruthg8r Premium Member

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    The thing is that the vast majority of people buy the blade and seven bone sections of the chuck to use as a pot roast. In that context, the blade section's greater suitability for use as a steak completely disappears as a factor. In other words, unlike grilling, when potted, the tenderness of the two cuts is almost exactly the same since the method of cooking controls the level of tenderness. As for the flavor of the two cuts, since they both are heavily marbled, due to the cooking process, the flavor is mostly a function of the seasonings and broth used while cooking.

    At that point, the factor driving the greater demand for the seven bone roast compared to the blade roast is that there is a greater percentage of useable meat per pound on the seven bone roast. If we had tried to sell blade roasts for the same price as seven bone roasts, the seven bone roasts would have disappeared fairly quickly, leaving only blade roasts to sell. As a result, like many stores, we sold the seven bone roast at the higher price that resulted in both cuts selling at about the same rate, which was necessary to keep both cuts in stock since both cuts came from the same primal cut. Yes.....the relative supply and demand drove the relative prices of both cuts.

    If most people were looking for chucks to be cooked as steaks, there would be greater demand for the blade section, but that is not why most people buy meat from the chuck section.
     
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  13. WhattaGator

    WhattaGator Ever Vigilant Psycho Mod Moderator VIP Member "Cook Shack Chef"

    Totally agree... The "common" chuck steak is nowhere near the quality., and as I previously stated, these cuts were most suitable for roasting.

    Let's not getinto "technicallities", that are mot likely talking over what "Cuts of Steak" this thread is about... It can destract from the title of the thread, and now start to talk about roasring, crockpot, etc.

    There is already a thread here, that , now titles "special recipes" actually began as "crockpot recipes", but, it grew exponentially, resulting in some great recipes being posted there.

    This is the main reason this thread was created... not only to get other's opinions, but ultimately as an educational tool, to inform some who might not be as familiar or knowledgeable on this subject, or many others in this forum.

    For example... certain cuts of meat will respond better to braising, grilling, roasting, or even smoking... but, I'll open new threads about that, in order to not lose information elsewhere.

    As Sam and Dave sang.... "Hold On, I'm Coming"

    It's a brand new subforum... kindly allow me a bit of time to get everything together.:D
     
  14. wjd

    wjd Premium Member

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    I use a small gas camping burner that my wife gave me. Gets super hot and holds a pretty good size cast iron skillet. But we have all sizes of cast iron. I find them great for pork filets also. I put the burner on the patio because my wife got tired of me smoking up the house!LOL
     
  15. scrappygator

    scrappygator Moderator VIP Member

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    My son who is a senior at UF, is also a meat cutter at Publix. He has really enjoyed learning that trade to learn about the different cuts of meat, and what to use when.
    We have cooked ribeyes and filets in the oven at 200 degrees with a probe thermometer. Set it to go off at whatever temperature you wish, he rare, me medium rare. Let rest for 10 minutes and then sear in cast iron. Turns out very good.
     
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  16. scrappygator

    scrappygator Moderator VIP Member

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    Don't know if this is the right place, but if you like spicy, try this. Take a whole beef tenderloin, use Allegro Hot and Spicy, strain the red pepper flakes out, and then inject the tenderloin with the liquid, put the red pepper flakes on top, and then put on the grill. It is "slap yo' mama" good. You can eat your way up from the small end until the big end gets to your desired temp.

    Great thread and forum. Thanks.
     
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  17. shelbygt350

    shelbygt350 GC Hall of Fame

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    I'm a steak guy going back decades.

    My fav is bone in ribeye due to flavor. Then porterhouse. Filet mignon not so much....which is why for years it was wrapped in bacon to add flavor. Filet lacks the fat for the flavor.

    No rubs or sauce on steak. Pepper it after cooking, not before. If it needs rub or sauce , might as well put a Ferrari engine in a Yugo w/ 4 flat tires.

    I like to put the steak in frig in a tight seal in lemon juice and salt for 2-3 days. Then grill it. I've used iron skillet and that is great too. I just tried 2 small boneless rib eyes in a Todd English Electric fryer and they were great.
     
  18. GratefulGator

    GratefulGator GC Legend

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    I like a Ribeye cooked in my 100 year old cast-iron skillet I got from my grandpappy. A little salt and pepper and I'm good to go.

    I also like the chuck eye steaks. They are well-marbled and have a great flavor. Can't beat 'em for $5.99/lb.
     
  19. shelbygt350

    shelbygt350 GC Hall of Fame

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    I like chuck too. I get a chuck roast, put in crock pot or in pressure cooker w/ a touch of red wine, some cut onions, then sprinkle it w/ dried onion soup package. The longer it cooks the more tender it gets to where you can eat w/ a fork, not knife.
     
  20. WhattaGator

    WhattaGator Ever Vigilant Psycho Mod Moderator VIP Member "Cook Shack Chef"

    Chuck DOES make a great roast,

    But, unless you can find a Chuck Eye, it doesn't quite cut the Steak title of the forum. .

    Perhaps I'll open another thread for roasting , or better yet, we could post our ideas in other threads ,
    It will make it easier for everyone to find and use them.

    NOTE" Please put your ideas and recipes for other cuts of meat into either the "Many Faforite Recipes"..... or better yet, in the "Various Cooking Methods" Threads...

    Various Cooking Methods has the description for roasting, as well as other methods, (broiling, stewing, etc.

    Thanks