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What is your thoughts on fracking?

Discussion in 'GatorNana's Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by OklahomaGator, Oct 25, 2020.

  1. homer

    homer GC Hall of Fame

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    So he stole the idea from the inventor?
     
  2. GatorGuyDallas

    GatorGuyDallas VIP Member

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    It was humor. He was behind the early effort.
     
  3. gatorcloud

    gatorcloud GC Hall of Fame

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    Sorry I was joking as well.
     
  4. cocodrilo

    cocodrilo GC Hall of Fame

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    I don't understand this concern about fracking when there are more important issues in this election, like Hunter Biden, his daddy Joe wearing a mask, and the Democrats running a monster for vice president.
     
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  5. GatorGuyDallas

    GatorGuyDallas VIP Member

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    I guess we both need to stay off the stand up circuit. :D
     
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  6. Gator515151

    Gator515151 GC Hall of Fame

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    Trump needs to ask Biden if he is aware Burisma is into fracking?

    Hunter ain't gonna like this Joe.
     
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  7. G8trGr8t

    G8trGr8t Premium Member

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    Almost all drilling in Oklahoma is horizontal shale wells that are fracked. Little to no conventional drilling
     
  8. nolancarey

    nolancarey GC Hall of Fame

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    That is fundamentally false. Simple google search will do it.
     
  9. FLIPCUP

    FLIPCUP GC Hall of Fame

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    As a retired Petroleum Engineer with extensive onsite drilling experience around our home we call earth including western United States...I am proud and relieved by many of the responses, especially the early ones, contained within this thread. Often responses in Too Hot are crap, based on little fact and with intent to hurt.
    Yes fracking filled an economic and supply void. Yes let us move on to renewable and responsible energy. msa3...you are a good listener with an apparent ability to reason.
    PS. I hydraulically fracked wells in south Texas and in the Gulf of Mexico in the late 70's.
     
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  10. homer

    homer GC Hall of Fame

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    Flip is back!!! Still living in Carrollwood?
     
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  11. G8trGr8t

    G8trGr8t Premium Member

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    Link? The STACK and SCOOP formations are practically 100% horizontal wells and they dominate the well applications I could find
     
  12. docspor

    docspor GC Hall of Fame

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    Address it legislatively. No EOs. & no BS proposition on the ballot like Colorado did last time.
     
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  13. duchen

    duchen VIP Member

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    Until the demand for oil is reduced by alternative energy technologies, we will need to find fossil fuel sources. It is a national security issue.

    The delicate balance is that, as demand is reduced, there will be companies that fail.

    We need to do this safely and minimize environmental damage.
     
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  14. G8trGr8t

    G8trGr8t Premium Member

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    From EIA report December 2019

    Are any wells still drilled using only conventional drilling practices? Yes, many vertical wells are still drilled and completed without hydraulic fracturing; however, these wells and older completion techniques are becoming less common. Based on the larger number of wells and footage drilled, horizontal drilling combined with hydraulic fracturing have become standard practice for oil and natural gas production in the United States.
     
  15. VAg8r1

    VAg8r1 GC Hall of Fame

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    I would also add that natural gas obtained almost entirely through fracking has significantly reduced the need for coal-fired power plants. Although both gas and coal are fossil fuels, natural gas is considerably cleaner and produces far less greenhouse gasses than does coal.
     
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  16. metalcoater

    metalcoater GC Hall of Fame

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    And both equally false.
     
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  17. slocala

    slocala VIP Member

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    To me, fracking is fine, but it comes down to water and where we land on healthcare pre-existing conditions. Fracking needs to continue to innovate to improve on groundwater impact and the heavy use of freshwater. In areas where fracking occurs, groundwater contamination could result in health impact and thus the questions on protections for pre-existing conditions.

    There is a looming water shortage that needs to be considered.

    Why is America running out of water?
     
  18. SeabudGator

    SeabudGator GC Hall of Fame

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    Can you explain this? If by limits you mean environmental protections (groundwater, stability, etc) that would seem to effect all market participants equally?

    What limits in our capitalistic society would be appropriate? Oil guys go boom/bust like clocks, so only the strongest frackers can/should survive.

    And the pressure of lower cost renewable energy is only going to increase (look at the cost of semiconductor products over time and apply that to panels, electric motors, battery technology). Look at the number of parts in an EV vs gas engine. That train is slow at first (think early PCs), builds speed (phones) and doesn’t stop (online everything). Should we limit fracking other than for environmental reasons or let it live its last decades as just another market participant?
     
  19. msa3

    msa3 Premium Member

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    I’m fine with it from an environmental standpoint. And I don’t think new limitations NEED to be put in place. However, since my wife inherited a large amount of stock in a company that has existing permits but currently shut down wells, it would be in our best interest if new permits were limited and scarcity became more of a factor.

    My comment was for my own personal, selfish interests. Nothing more. :)

    As for the rest of your post, I think the actual costs and consequences of renewables has yet to be articulated. We need to figure out how to minimize line loss and increase battery storage life and capacity before we do so much to contain fossil fuels that they become prohibitive. We need honest conversations about the costs and consequences of renewables before we assume they are THE workable solution. Will electric cars, for example, continue to make sense when charging stations start to want money to plug in? Since winter storms are coming I looked to upgrade my backup system — the solar and power wall option is nearly four times the cost of a more powerful propane generator. I’ve spent some time near wind farms; they can be loud. Both they and solar farms take up a lot of space, space that’s available in some places but not others. As much as the idea is appealing, there’s a way to go before we can be independent of fossil fuels, and I think the solution won’t be wind or solar, but fusion or renewed use of fission. And that’s a whole ‘nother can of worms.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2020
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  20. nolancarey

    nolancarey GC Hall of Fame

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    Sorry for the delay, but it seems like you found it. Traditional oil drilling has been on the way out for decades, but it does still exist. Both processes do make me wonder about the viability of the fragile Ogallala Aquifer.

    Vertical Wells Still a Mainstay of Oil Production in Oklahoma