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Various Cooking Methods

Discussion in 'Swamp Cook Shack' started by WhattaGator, Feb 9, 2019.

  1. WhattaGator

    WhattaGator Ever Vigilant Psycho Mod Moderator VIP Member "Cook Shack Chef"

    As there are so many cooking techniques out there in the culinary world, many are commonly known, ( roasting, frying, grilling, smoking, etc), while others aren't (sous-vide, brown-butter basting, etc)

    Many methods are used together.

    Whet methods are used in your recipes?
     
  2. insuragator

    insuragator Premium Member

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    Just bought an 'instapot'. Any recommendations? I cooked a roast last night and to be very blunt ---- IT SUCKED lol
     
  3. WhattaGator

    WhattaGator Ever Vigilant Psycho Mod Moderator VIP Member "Cook Shack Chef"

    |o|
    What ingredients did you use , and how much beef stock/broth did you add?

    How big was the roast, what cut was it and did you sear the meat first?
    [
     
  4. anstro76

    anstro76 GC Hall of Fame

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    Pretty much all of them.
     
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  5. WhattaGator

    WhattaGator Ever Vigilant Psycho Mod Moderator VIP Member "Cook Shack Chef"

    Hmm...

    I was kinda looking for a discussion on how you might use them... if people have certain tricks or tips they might have.
     
  6. skz868992

    skz868992 Premium Member

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    This is a great idea for a sub forum!
    I pretty much grill all the time. If I’m doing a roast, I season it and sear all sides before putting it in the crockpot. Olive or sesame oil, salt, pepper, cayenne, garlic are my go to rub for almost any type or cut of meat.
     
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  7. WhattaGator

    WhattaGator Ever Vigilant Psycho Mod Moderator VIP Member "Cook Shack Chef"

    I understand using the crockpot, but do you ever actually roast?... for example, a Prime Rib?

    Certain cuts, like Chuck, are perfect for crockpot "pot roast", while a "diamond round" is far too lean, and will result in a stringy meat there, and is far more suitable for roasting.
     
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  8. skz868992

    skz868992 Premium Member

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    Prime rib I do in the oven, although Sometimes I get that grill char first, then go low and slow in the oven.
     
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  9. FloridaGator80

    FloridaGator80 of the Gator Nation VIP Member

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    I don't know much about cooking methods, but I do know that prep is key to everything and the best kitchen utensil is a pull-cord chopper (I don't know what it's officially called). I use one to chop pepper and onions for chili and it makes the prep work go very smoothly. Chefs on TV chop away and make it look easy, but if you're an amateur like myself, then you know challenging that becomes. Give one a try. They're relatively inexpensive and last a long time.
     
  10. xxmacxx

    xxmacxx VIP Member

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    I've been using the InstaPot for the past year making stews. I found the meat turned out best when it wasn't to thick(IE less than 2"). I have used thick pieces and they never shred like the thinner ones. I also brown is on all sides before cooking. I do a ~3lb piece for 75 minutes and they turn out pretty great.
     
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  11. WhattaGator

    WhattaGator Ever Vigilant Psycho Mod Moderator VIP Member "Cook Shack Chef"

    A food processor is aagreat tool. So is a "Mandoline" for thin slicing and shredding...

    However, there is a VERY important use for "knife skills" You're going to have to use knives for several uses, and one should know the importance on how to handle them.

    First.... NEVER try to use a dull knife!! That's the #1 cause of accidental injuries. Your knife should be sharp. That way, you'll have control of what you're doing.

    Next, You'll have to use your knuckles as the "guide" for using your knife.... the reason? So you don't cut the tips of your fingers.. Use your thumb to push whatever your cutting forward.

     
  12. FloridaGator80

    FloridaGator80 of the Gator Nation VIP Member

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    Thanks! There's an old Chinese saying that asks, "Can he (or she) hold a knife?" According to the saying, if you can't hold a knife properly you won't be able to cook. I'm a total amateur and my only edged tool skills came from long-ago fencing lessons (I took fencing as a PE class at UF ... it was in the old gym that was "Alligator Alley" for the hoops team).
     
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  13. strulock

    strulock All American

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    School us on Prime Rib. Love the stuff, only big cut of meat I've never tried to cook. Kinda pricey to botch it.
     
  14. strulock

    strulock All American

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    And thanks to who ever started this forum. Officially my second favorite forum on GC.
     
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  15. skz868992

    skz868992 Premium Member

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    I just follow a blend of recipes. Olive oil, rub, grill on all sides then finish in the oven at 250. Use a meat thermometer and take it out about 10 degrees short of where you like it. Cover and let it rest for 15-20 min before slicing.
     
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  16. strulock

    strulock All American

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    What kinda rub? Best PR I've ever had was at The Steakhouse, circus circus, Vegas. Phenomenal, doesn't seem to have much on it, just good beef.
     
  17. skz868992

    skz868992 Premium Member

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    I use Montreal Steak rub or make my own of pepper, garlic salt, cayenne, and paprika.
     
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  18. WhattaGator

    WhattaGator Ever Vigilant Psycho Mod Moderator VIP Member "Cook Shack Chef"

    There are several methods and seasoning options

    Rub in a decent bit of Kosher salt, about 1 1/2 Tbsps up to a day earlier for a 3-4 rib roast. Wrap it in plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator.
    I sometimes use about 1 Tbsp each of finely chopped fresh rosemary and thyme each. if using, wait until you take the roast out of the fridge, and let it sit for an hour or so to bring it closer to room temperature, then rub those ingredients in.
    Optional... 1 1/2 to 2 Tsps freshly ground black pepper

    In a roasting pan, place the roast fat side up, with the bones touching the bottom of the roasting pan.

    Preheat your oven to 475 degrees. put roast into oven and cook for 20 minutes. Reduce temperature to 275 and continue cooking for about 11 minutes per pound.(about 1 hour and 10 minutes.
    Use an internal meat thermometer to check for your desired doneness, but remove the roast about 5 degrees less than required. (it'll continue to cook).. Tent the roast with aluminum foil.

    Have some very hot water ready. Remove the roasting pan, and, using the back of a dinner fork, SLOWLY add some hot water into the bottom of the roasting pan... Those its of what you might think is burnt stuff is actually what will quickly dissolve, and become your Au Jus for your roast.
     
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  19. WhattaGator

    WhattaGator Ever Vigilant Psycho Mod Moderator VIP Member "Cook Shack Chef"

    An easy method of cooking, one that can make you a hero in the kitchen....

    Braising. This method can utilize sometimes tougher cuts of meat, like short ribs, brisket, etc. and make it fll-off-the-bone,or fork tender.

    There are four key steps to a perfect braised meat dish;

    1; Sear the meat.
    Season your meat on all sides.
    Pour Oil into a a heavy lidded pot, like a cast iron enemled dutch oven.
    Don't crowd your meat in the pot,(you don't want to steam the meat) Take the time to brown it on all sides.
    Remove the meat and set aside.

    2; Saute' the Mirepoix
    Cook the c Celery, Carrots and Onions in the drippings from the meat over medium-high heat,stirring frequently.
    Aim for a darker color without scorching.

    3; Deglaze the pot
    Add your braising liquid (usually a combination of beef stock or broth and a bit of red wine.
    Using a flat wooden spoon,stir and scrape the browned bits from the bottom of the pot ( those bits are your "flavor")

    4; Braise it
    Return the meat to the pot, along with any juices that may be there.
    Do NOT submerge the meat... you're not stewing, not boiling, you're braising. Adding too much broth will dilute the sauce.
    Bring the liquid to a simmer, then cover and put into a 325 degree oven.

    Taking your braise to the next level;
    Consider your recipe. if your recipe includes added vegetables, such as fennel, potatoes, mushrooms, greens, etc. add them 45 minutes before serving
    Check the liquid if it's too low, (an inch or less), add a splash more, return to oven.

    When the meat is fork tender, remove it, and the vegetables..
    Skim the surface fat.
    Simmer until you've got a sauce that coats the back of a spoon.
    (Optional) Add 2 Tbsps Butter, and stir to get a glossier sauce.

    Return meat and vegetables to fully heat.


    Tips to enhance your dish:
    Citrus Zest; To add a bit of "brightness"
    Fresh herbs; Parsley, Basil,Cilantro
    Minced Anchovies; Brings a savory "umami" flavor boost
    Ginger; Adds a bit of sweet heat
    Lemongrass; Addsa hint of citrus & floral