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The Outlet Pass: We Need to Use It

Discussion in 'Nuttin' but Net' started by murphree_hall, Feb 23, 2020.

  1. murphree_hall

    murphree_hall All American

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    I'm a Coach White supporter, but one thing I criticize is the lack of outlet passing on this team. Such a basic and necessary part of the game. When there is a steal or rebound, our players will do one of several things:

    - Pass backwards to the point guard, thus allowing the defense to get set up where they had previously been at a disadvantage

    - Jog up the court head forward without turning around looking for the outlet pass

    - In the rare case there is an outlet pass, nobody is running and filling the lanes

    Not sure why this is happening. I think our PGs are kind of control freaks and think they need to control the ball at all times. I have been like that on teams, myself, but only when I had guys who would turn it over if they tried to initiate a break. Maybe that is why Coach is directing/allowing them to play this way. I'm a point guard, but if I have other competent passers and dribblers on my team, as soon as the shot goes up I'm taking off downcourt like a wide receiver looking for the pass and layup.
     
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  2. tundragator

    tundragator GC Legend

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    Got to slow it down to call a play.
     
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  3. BLING

    BLING GC Hall of Fame

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    I’ve noticed this for awhile. Still no idea if this is a Mike White deal or a Nembhard deal, because I don't really remember thinking that with Chiozza or Hill even with MW as coach. This team just seems to hate fast breaks, and so many times the 1st move of whoever gets the ball even off a steal or long rebound is to pull back or even pass backwards. The ball is almost always last up the court. I hate it. Plus when we do get a rare fast break, we seem to lack the fundamentals of floor spacing. I’ve seen several with guys basically running into traffic (or two gators filling the same lane) instead of properly filling the lanes on the wings.

    Even if we were an elite defense with a top 10 efficient offense, the first move should always be to push fast. You can always pull back if the break isn’t there, but I wonder how many easy buckets and fast break chances this team misses out on because it doesn’t even push - we aren’t even probing the other teams defense. A shame because we have a few guys who can fly, I can barely remember Lewis getting any dunks in games at all, and there is no way to see that as anything but rediculous.
     
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  4. 407king

    407king GC Hall of Fame

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    This is where Tre Mann's development has hurt this team. Aside from Nembhard and occasionally Keyontae this team has struggled in the open floor.

    Even Mann and Glover have struggled to learn to pass the rock at times to help the flow of the offense in transition.
     
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  5. murphree_hall

    murphree_hall All American

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    A very good point here. You have to push it even if it doesn't pan out, to at least make them run back and be on edge. Unsuccessful fast breaks are just as important as successful ones.
     
  6. vaxcardinal

    vaxcardinal GC Hall of Fame

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    I agree, with Mann and Glover being in the first year of organized basketball, its going to take them time to learn how to pass the ball ;)
     
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  7. 407king

    407king GC Hall of Fame

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    Lol, it's madness. It certainly has taken one of them a year to learn to pass the ball. Mick even joked about it vs Arkansas "his best pass of the season". The other used to think his inside-out dribble that turned into a step back threee was better than just moving the ball too.
     
  8. akaGatorhoops

    akaGatorhoops VIP Member GC Columnist

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    The guys usually out front in transition are the guards and the wings.
    And we just don’t trust those guys in transition ...., Glover, Lewis, Locke and Mann do not inspire confidence in the open court.
     
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  9. BLING

    BLING GC Hall of Fame

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    Glover seems fast enough to push tempo, and if nothing else he is a guy whose instinct definitely seems to push. Mann is a rookie, but I’ve seem him finish some drives, I feel like he could do it (but he’s also the guy I recall basically running into a teammate on a 3 in 2 opportunity in a prior game lol)

    Really the only one that maybe isn’t great at finishing is Locke. But there is still something he can do very effectively on a break. Run to his spot for a possible 3. In a 3 on 2 break either he gets open or if someone chases him to the 3 that makes it a 2 on 1 at the rim.
     
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  10. GatorPlanet

    GatorPlanet GC Hall of Fame

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    Freshmen generally aren't good at bringing the ball up court. BD would press them relentlessly.
     
  11. murphree_hall

    murphree_hall All American

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    I disagree with that general statement, but regardless, we are talking about outlet passes. That's almost the opposite of a point guard bringing (walking) the ball up the court.
     
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  12. GatorLurker

    GatorLurker VIP Member

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    When you need everyone to rebound it is hard to leak people out.
     
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  13. Matthanuf06

    Matthanuf06 GC Hall of Fame

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    It’s madness.

    Just because you start running doesn’t mean you must shoot early. You can always pull it back.

    We leave a bunch of points on the court every game because of this strategy.

    Will we have a turnover or two because of it? Of course, but our half court offense isn’t exactly a model offense.
     
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  14. phideltdj

    phideltdj GC Hall of Fame

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    Most coaches can live with mistakes out of aggressive plays...the mistakes on passive plays are frustrating. Aggressive teams usually get more whistles going to the basket as well.
     
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  15. regurgigator

    regurgigator VIP Member

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    In some recent games, we have been throwing ahead successfully at times to Locke for some fast-break threes. UK is a good defensive team and and they get back on defense really well in transition. So, push-the-ball opportunities were seldom there in that game.


    Some of our players don't show great judgment on when to drive and when to pass in the half court game. Expecting them to do it well in fast-break situations is wishful thinking IMHO.
     
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  16. g8wayg8r

    g8wayg8r All American

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    There were times very early in the season where they struggled with finishing and ended up turning the ball over. I suspect the players could finish better presently but is it worth the gamble in close games? MW appears to be a numbers coach so I doubt he or the team feels it worthwhile as a rule.