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Space News,Notes

Discussion in 'GatorTail Pub' started by gatorjjh, Apr 23, 2019.

  1. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    countdown to Apollo 11

    Celebrating the moon landing anniversary

    By Patrick Connolly Sentinel
    On July 20, 1969, astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin made history when they became the first two people to set foot on the moon.

    Worldwide, families huddled around TV screens and in public squares to witness the astronauts touching down on the moon’s surface, celebrating humanity’s accomplishment with one another.
    In Orlando, a Sentinel story published on July 21, 1969, reported an “aura of ‘Christmas in July’ ” all over The City Beautiful following the 4:17 p.m. moon landing on the previous day.

    “A quiet kindness and peaceful atmosphere prevailed throughout the day,” Rita Bauer, of Winter Park, was quoted saying.

    The 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing should bring similar cause for celebration and reflection on just how far we’ve come since that momentous day in 1969. Here are some ways that you can celebrate the moon landing anniversary in Central Florida.
    Celebrating the moon landing anniversary
     
  2. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    ‘Trip to anywhere starts right here’

    Before Apollo moon rockets traveled 24K mph, they took a slow ride to launch pads on crawlers
    By Kevin Spear Sentinel
    The moon race was won with rockets a dozen times faster than a bullet.

    But before liftoff, Apollo spacecraft took a ride slower than a lazy stroll. They were carried to the launch pad by a legendary machine aptly called a crawler.

    Crawlers were diesel-drinking mules in service of liquid-oxygen thoroughbreds.
    And even a half century later, the hulking machines are poised to remain a core part of the nation’s space program and service new rockets for decades to come.

    “The trip to anywhere starts right here on this crawler,” said Sam Dove, veteran driver of the transporters.
    The sleek Saturn V rockets that propelled the Apollo capsules into orbit outshined the crawlers. The rockets were white beacons; crawlers wore a heavy smear of black grease.

    ‘TRIP TO ANYWHERE STARTS RIGHT HERE’
     
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  3. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Countdown to Apollo 11

    1969 space crew was supposed to be joined by a monkey

    By Roger Simmons/Sentinel
    When Apollo 11 launched its moon trip on July 16, 1969, there were supposed to be four U.S. astronauts in space: Armstrong, Aldrin, Collins and Bonny.

    Nobody can make a monkey out of a U.S. astronaut named Bonny, because he’s already one,” reported the Orlando Sentinel on July 2, 1969.
    Bonny was a 14-pound pigtail monkey from Thailand. He would be launched into space on June 28, 1969, on a 1,536-pound biosatellite for a planned 30-day mission to coincide with the Apollo 11 launch and lunar landing.

    But while Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins were all going to the moon, Bonny wasn’t. He was going to be parked in Earth orbit for the duration of his $92 million space flight, providing key scientific data for NASA as the agency also monitored its human astronauts.
    “Sensors painlessly implanted in the monkey’s brain and heart and other body parts will see how weightlessness affects the animal’s mental, emotional and physiological process,” United Press International reported on Bonny’s launch day.
    1969 space crew was supposed to be joined by a monkey
     
  4. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Countdown to Apollo 11

    Launch day vips


    Special guests included LBJ, Charles Lindbergh, Johnny Carson and many more

    By Roger Simmons Sentinel
    Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins were the most important people to NASA on launch day in 1969, but they did have competition.

    There were thousands of Very Important People, aka VIPs, at Kennedy Space Center on July 16. They formed an eclectic congregation of politicians, diplomats, celebrities, businessmen, scientists and relatives who received special NASA access to watch the moon launch.
    Where else could you find political polar opposites like former President Lyndon B. Johnson and current VP Spiro Agnew rubbing elbows? Or comedian Jack Benny mingling with diplomats while aviation pioneer Charles Lindbergh was secretly milling about?

    “The VIP list includes 69 ambassadors of foreign governments; 100 foreign science ministers, attaches and military aviation officials; 19 governors, 40 mayors and 275 leaders of commerce and industry in the United States,” the Orlando Sentinel reported on launch day, with a partial list of all several hundred people invited to the launch.
    LAUNCH DAY VIPS
     
  5. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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  6. LakeGator

    LakeGator Mostly Harmless Moderator

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    • Agree Agree x 1
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  7. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Orion passes key test
    Launch proves craft can save astronauts in case of mid-flight emergency
    By Chabeli Herrera Sentinel

    CAPE CANAVERAL — They lined the pier hundreds deep, a mass of Orion engineers, NASA employees and their families at Jetty Park in Cape Canaveral, tensely waiting to watch the critical next test in a project many of them have invested the better part of the last decade on.

    The orange glow of the sun pouring over the horizon, they squinted into the distance at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s launch pad 46, where precisely at 7 a.m. Tuesday the spacecraft that will one day take astronauts back to the moon shot up, like a mullet leaping out of the water, into the sky.

    Its mission: To test abort systems, proving the craft can save its human inhabitants in the case of an emergency mid-flight, though there were no astronauts on board for this flight.

    Traveling at about 800 mph, the 93-foot stack consisting of a Northrop Grumman booster and Lockheed Martin-built crew module and launch abort system climbed to about 31,000 feet in 50 seconds. Just then, a roar crashed over the surf as the capsule initiated its abort.
    Orion passes key test
     
  8. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Countdown to Apollo 11

    More than 400,000 contributed to success

    Some of the army of workers share their stories

    By Chabeli Herrera Sentinel
    It took more than 400,000 scientists, engineers and technicians across the United States, an army of workers that together tackled what seemed like an invincible foe: Getting a spacecraft to break free of the iron grasp of Earth’s atmosphere into lunar orbit and then, with pinpoint precision, onto that powdery surface we now know makes up the moon.

    The three men who took the journey became the faces of the achievement — arguably humanity’s greatest. But it was the men and women who worked in factories and offices across the nation over the better part of a decade — people like Frances “Poppy” Northcutt, the first woman in NASA’s Mission Control, and Bill Moon, a Chinese American flight controller who was the first minority to work in Mission Control — that took the moon landing from presidential challenge to tangible reality.

    At the end of the Apollo 11 mission, on July 23, 1969 — 50 years ago this summer — moonwalker Neil Armstrong concluded his final television broadcast before he, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins were scheduled to return to Earth with a message to the thousands of people who had worked on the Apollo project.

    “We would like to give special thanks to all those Americans who built the spacecraft; who did the construction, design, the tests, and put their hearts and all their abilities into those craft,” Armstrong said. “To those people tonight, we give a special thank you, and to all the other people that are listening and watching tonight, God bless you. Goodnight from Apollo 11.”
    More than 400,000 contributed to success
     
  9. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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  10. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Doubters still think mission was fake
    By David Whitley Sentinel
    One group will not be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing for what it believes is a simple reason.

    It never happened.

    Instead of galavanting around Sea of Tranquillity, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were in the Nevada desert pulling off the greatest bit of fake news in the history of the universe.

    Most of the 650 million people who watched TV on July 20, 1969, would have found that notion preposterous.

    But NASA’s grand achievement has always had doubters. Or are they just a bunch of lunar lunatics?

    Doubters still think mission was fake
     
  11. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Apollo 11 left disc of poetic tidings

    By Roger Simmons Sentinel
    It’s about the size of a 50-cent coin and has been on the moon for nearly 50 years. Sealed inside an aluminum capsule, the small silicon disc waits patiently for some future alien civilization to discover it.

    The words “From Planet Earth – July 1969. Goodwill messages from around the world brought to the Moon by the astronauts of Apollo 11,” appear on the top and sides of a specially made disc that commemorates humans’ first visit to the moon.

    It landed on the lunar surface with Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, and it includes the names of Congressional and NASA leaders plus quotes from speeches by U.S. presidents. But it’s primarily a device to deliver messages from 73 world leaders, tidings that include congratulations to America for its great scientific feat, wishes for a new era of universal peace and some well-played humble-brags.

    “I am particularly proud speaking on behalf of the Greek nation, whose ancestors had the privilege to be forerunners in the philosophical thought and scientific research which first penetrated the universe,” Greece’s George Zoitakis said in his country’s message.
    Apollo 11 left disc of poetic tidings
     
  12. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    Were you properly clothed? ;) I've heard stories.
     
    • Wish I would have said that Wish I would have said that x 1
  13. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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  14. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    [​IMG]

    Countdown to Apollo 11
    Historic flight inspired a generation to go to space

    By Kyle Arnold Sentinel
    David McFarland was just shy of his 14th birthday when on July 20, 1969, he sat in front of the family television and joined 650 million other enthralled viewers as Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to set foot on the moon.

    Kelly DeFazio put crayon to paper to sketch pictures of the Saturn V rocket launching off from Cape Kennedy. Dan Quinn watched thousands of fans gather along the Indian River in Brevard County to watch historic Apollo program rocket launches.

    “How amazing that all was watching those first steps,” McFarland said. “It just re-amplified my interest in what the country was doing. It was an inspiration.”

    Florida’s growing space industry is now, in large part, led by the young people that watched the Apollo 11 astronauts in awe, from the rank-and-file workers putting satellites into space to billionaires plotting ambitious trips beyond the pull of Earth’s gravity.

    “People, especially young people, wanted to be a part of it,” said Robert Taylor, a history professor at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne. “They wanted to have the same kind of trajectory the astronauts they were watching on television did.”
    Historic flight inspired a generation to go to space
     
  15. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Countdown to Apollo 11

    Astronauts lived in Houston, trained in Florida

    By Stephen Hudak in the Sentinel
    Apollo 11 Astronaut Michael Collins commuted to work in Florida in a supersonic jet from 900 miles away.

    The two-seat Northrop T-38, which NASA also used regularly as a jet trainer for its stable of astronauts, enabled Collins to spend weekends with his wife Pat and the couple’s three children at their home in suburban Houston and still arrive on time at the Kennedy Space Center for Monday morning Moon-flight meetings.

    “Every astronaut could fly a T-38 whenever they needed to get from Houston to Florida or back,” said science journalist Nancy Atkinson, author of “Eight Years to the Moon: The History of the Apollo Missions” and contributing editor of “Universe Today,” a space and astronomy news website. “It was the quickest and easiest way to get them from place to place.”

    Apollo 11’s moonwalkers Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin also piloted T-38s to work as the crew logged 14-hour training days, six days a week for six months, mostly in Florida and Texas.
    Astronauts lived in Houston, trained in Florida
     
  16. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Countdown to Apollo 11
    Race to moon helped create today’s world

    By Kevin Spear sentinel
    As we near Apollo 11’s 50th anniversary, former Orlando Sentinel editor Charles Fishman spoke with the Sentinel about his book recently published by Simon & Schuster: “One Giant Leap: The Impossible Mission That Flew Us to the Moon.”

    Why did President Kennedy think it was even possible to land on the moon?

    It was May 25, 1961, when President Kennedy said, “Let’s go to the moon.” At that moment, the U.S. had no rockets with which to launch to the moon, no launch pads from which to send them, no spacesuits for moon walking astronauts, no spaceships to get fly there, no computers small enough and powerful to fly those ships to the Moon, and no space food for them to eat on the way.

    The day of Kennedy’s speech, the U.S. had 15 minutes total manned spaceflight experience, from the first mission by Alan Shepard, which did nothing but loop up from Cape Canaveral, arc up into space for 5 minutes, and then land back in the Atlantic Ocean just 303 miles southeast of Florida.

    The idea that NASA could solve all those problems — 10,000 problems — and land Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on the moon eight years later — that seems astonishing and crazy, even knowing that we did it.
    Race to moon helped create today’s world
     
  17. LakeGator

    LakeGator Mostly Harmless Moderator

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    The article, Astronauts lived in Houston, trained in Florida, posted above reminded me of the T-38 crash that killed a Gemini crew as described in this Wikipedia article. I believe these were the first two US astronauts to die.

     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  18. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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  19. WhattaGator

    WhattaGator "Where's The Beef"?? (Or the crabcakes, etc.)... VIP Member "Cook Shack Chef"

    Last edited: Jul 14, 2019
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  20. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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