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Space News,Notes (2020)

Discussion in 'GatorTail Pub' started by gatorjjh, Jan 2, 2020.

  1. g8trdave

    g8trdave It's Great to Be a Florida Gator!!! VIP Member

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    Catastrophic failures can be fun to watch, though. As long as no one is in or near enough to the spacecraft to get hurt, I'm not opposed to a catastrophic failure every once in a while :-/
     
  2. exiledgator

    exiledgator Gruntled

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  3. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    When I was married I sure enjoyed every lift off...:devil::D
     
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  4. OklahomaGator

    OklahomaGator Jedi Administrator Moderator VIP Member

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    It has been almost 10 years.
     
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  5. exiledgator

    exiledgator Gruntled

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    Yes. This is huge, huge news.

    I hope we have don't have to rely on foreign entities to put our people into space again.
     
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  6. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    NASA goes with SpaceX, Blue Origin, Dynetics
    By Richard Tribou in the Sentinel
    NASA went with big names SpaceX and Blue Origin as well as lesser-known Dynetics as the three commercial companies vying to build lunar landers for its Artemis missions to return humans to the moon by 2024.

    The three contracts worth $967 million are for design and development of human landing systems. They were awarded under the Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships program. Several other companies that were vying for the contract including Boeing and Sierra Nevada Corp. did not make the cut.

    The Artemis missions will use NASA’s Space Launch System rocket and Orion capsule to take off from Kennedy Space Center and enter lunar orbit. That along with the Gateway space station are part of NASA’s long-term plans to send humans back to the moon for the first time since 1972 and eventually to be able to explore farther destinations including Mars.

    The new SpaceX Starship spacecraft is one of the three, to be launched to the moon on the company’s in-the-works Super Heavy rocket. Elon Musk’s stainless steel reusable spacecraft has been undergoing tests at its southeast Texas facility, with Musk pushing for orbital launches and crewed missions by 2020.

    The proposal will be for the Starship to launch into Earth orbit, demonstrate refueling while in orbit, make its way to the moon and then rendezvous with either the Orion capsule or Gateway station for astronaut transfer.

    Starship’s design allows it to land on the lunar surface in the same manner that its Falcon 9 rocket first stages return to Earth in an upright position utilizing controlled reverse-thrust descents.

    Jeff Bezos’ company Blue Origin, which is leading what it calls its “National Team” that includes Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and Draper, will be moving forward with a lander similar to its proposed Blue Moon lander. Now part of a three-stage spacecraft, the Integrated Lander Vehicle gets to and from the lunar surface in a similar manner to how the Apollo landings occurred.

    NASA goes with SpaceX, Blue Origin, Dynetics
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    SpaceX, NASA to fly Crew Dragon
    New vehicle’s mission to space marks the 9th time in world history
    By Chabeli Carrazana Sentinel
    May 27 could mark only the ninth time in the history of the world that a crew of astronauts will take off from a brand new launch vehicle on a mission to space. The last time the United States did it was in 1981, 39 years ago.

    The magnitude of the historical milestone and the pressure of the launch is weighing on the teams at SpaceX and NASA that are orchestrating the mission, a piloted test flight of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon capsule that plans to return to the U.S. the capability of flying astronauts to the International Space Station from American soil.
    With only 26 days until the flight, SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell said during a press conference Friday that her “heart is sitting right here,” pointing at her throat.

    “And I think it’s going to stay there,” she said, “until we get [astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley] safely back from the ISS.”

    Hurley flew on the last mission of the space shuttle in 2011, a turning point in the nation’s space program when Russia took over as the nation shuttling astronauts to space — for $80 million a seat. Since then, NASA has been working with private companies to change that. The path to regular operational missions from the Space Coast will be clear if this month’s flight is successful. It’s scheduled for 4:32 p.m. from Kennedy Space Center’s launch complex 39A, the same one that launched astronauts to the moon in 1969. A back-up launch window is available on May 30.
    SpaceX, NASA to fly Crew Dragon
     
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  8. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Cruise working with NASA, SpaceX to film movie on ISS
    By Chabeli Carrazana in the Sentinel
    Like “Mission: Impossible,” but without gravity. Or, no, like “Top Gun,” but with rockets instead.
    Whatever the conversations in the writing room, it seems like Tom Cruise is in talks to take his action skills to the new frontier: Space. And not in the CGI sense.

    NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine tweeted Tuesday that Cruise and NASA will be working on a film aboard the International Space Station.

    “We need popular media to inspire a new generation of engineers and scientists to make NASA’s ambitious plans a reality,” Bridenstine tweeted.
    SpaceX founder Elon Musk chimed in later, tweeting, “Should be a lot of fun!”
    SpaceX is three weeks away from launching humans from the U.S. to the ISS for the first time in nine years. If successful, the program, called Commercial Crew, would then evolve to run operational missions, as well as flights carrying private travelers, like Cruise.

    SpaceX and NASA haven’t specified whether Cruise will fly on one of these missions, or if the three parties will collaborate on a film partially shot in space.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  9. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Who’s flying in the SpaceX Crew Dragon? Meet astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley
    By Antonia Jaramillo, Florida Today
    Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley will break the nine-year drought on crewed flights from Kennedy Space Center on May 27.

    It’s not every day that you get to see your husband fly to space. And it’s even more unusual when you can relate to that experience, as well.

    But that’s what’s in store for NASA astronauts Megan McArthur and Karen Nyberg when their spouses, Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley, break the nine-year drought on crewed flights from Kennedy Space Center on May 27.

    From the safe confines of KSC, McArthur and Nyberg, along with their sons, will watch as Behnken, 49, and Hurley, 53, blast off from pad 39A on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon capsule for a historic mission to the International Space Station that will place them in the Astronaut Hall of Fame.

    They will know the excitement running through Behnken’s and Hurley’s veins as they become the first astronauts to fly to space from U.S. soil since the shuttle program ended in 2011 and the first to command an entirely new spacecraft since the debut of the shuttle in 1981.

    SpaceX’s next launch will officially have astronauts on board

    And yes, McArthur and Nyberg will know the dangers that come along with human spaceflight, too.

    For Behnken and Hurley, the flight is a career-capping opportunity that’s even more special because of their long-time friendship, which began when they joined the astronaut class in 2000.
    Who's flying in the SpaceX Crew Dragon? Meet astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley
     
  10. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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  11. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    NASA executive quits days ahead of launch
    By Marcia Dunn Sentinel
    NASA’s chief of human exploration has resigned just days before the first astronaut launch in nearly a decade from Kennedy Space Center. In an interview with the Washington Post, Douglas Loverro declined to discuss the exact details of why he resigned.

    “It had nothing to do with commercial crew,” he said, referring to the launch scheduled for May 27. “It had to do with moving fast on Artemis, and I don’t want to characterize it in any more detail than that.”

    Artemis is NASA’s program to return people to the moon. In April, NASA awarded Artemis contracts worth nearly $1 billion combined, to teams led by Blue Origin, Dynetics, and to SpaceX.

    NPR reported Loverro wrote a farewell message to NASA employees.

    “I had truly looked forward to living the next four-plus years with you as we returned Americans to the surface of the moon and prepared for the long journey beyond. But that is not to be,” Loverro wrote, and that he stated he had taken “a risk” earlier in the year because he judged it necessary to fulfill the mission, NPR reported.

    “Now, over the balance of time, it is clear that I made a mistake in that choice for which I alone must bear the consequences,” he wrote.

    Loverro, whose resignation took effect Monday, joined NASA last October. He is a former Defense Department and National Reconnaissance Office manager, specializing in space security matters for three decades. The space agency notified employees of the news Tuesday.
    NASA executive quits days ahead of launch
     
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  12. LakeGator

    LakeGator Mostly Harmless Moderator

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    This is a bit disconcerting and strange. If this resignation had nothing to do with the commercial flight and was due to the return to the moon you would have hoped he would have stayed in place to assure the safe completion of the SpaceX manned mission in a few days. This resignation adds stress to the people in the chain of command and could affect the decisions made in that chain.

    Sadly, NASA management has had a couple of horrible decisions in the manned flight program as seen in Challenger and Columbia. Hopefully, the upcoming launch is going to be a great success.
     
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  13. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    I bet we get at least some details in the next day or 2
     
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  14. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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  15. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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  16. LakeGator

    LakeGator Mostly Harmless Moderator

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    What SpaceX is doing on this is impressive but one effect is that ground based astronomy is going to be impacted as described in this article, The true impact of SpaceX’s Starlink constellation on astronomy is coming into focus

     
  17. demosthenes

    demosthenes Premium Member

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    This has been vastly overstated. They’re only visible in the period after launch but before settling into their final orbits. Even then they’re only visible an hour or two before dawn and after sunset. Also, most astronomy they’re talking about relies on taking thousands of photographs and merging them together which easily removes the satellites. Even so, SpaceX has worked to minimize their brightness by creating sunshades and changing the angle of the satellites to cut down on reflection.

    Internet supply to the rural and undeveloped areas will be off much greater benefit than the loss in astronomy. Particularly when you consider these cheap launches mean there will be more telescopes launched to space which are far superior to ground based telescopes. NASA is currently considering a giant telescope on the dark side of the moon in a crater which would provide unparalleled views into deep space.
     
  18. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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  19. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Last edited: Jul 11, 2020
  20. g8orbill

    g8orbill Old Gator Moderator VIP Member

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    I can remember standing on the playground at Clermont Elementary and watching the space ships go up in the mid 60's