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Sessions denies access to asylum for domestic abuse victims

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by gatorknights, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    Agreed!
     
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  2. Claygator

    Claygator GC Hall of Fame

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    Exactly. It is an absolutely BS reason to grant asylum. Yomama at it again.

    "My boyfriend whacked me!!" Please grant me asylum!!"

    Perhaps victims of domestic abuse should contact the police in their own country and ask for the crime to be prosecuted.
     
  3. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    From my previous post:

    " Believe it or not, but sometimes young women are too afraid to report their abuser for fear of more harm to her and her children and family too. It happens, just ask my mom. Does that mean no report = no abuse? Of course not, don't be ridiculous. And the push back on the victim by outsiders just makes is that much more difficult."

    If only it were that simple, and tell that to the children when mom is laying in a bloody pulp on the living room floor.
     
  4. Claygator

    Claygator GC Hall of Fame

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    What about victims of burglary? Of bullying? Of muggings? What about the risk of being exposed to Ebola?

    Let's let them all in; no reason for them to address this in the criminal justice or health care systems in their own country.

    I can't believe anyone actually thinks differently.
     
  5. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    I can't believe anyone actually thinks it's ok to turn our backs to battered women. Unless we don't think it's any big deal.
     
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  6. Rocinante

    Rocinante Senior

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    What percentage of those applications did you participate in investigstion. If you didn’t participate where is the report signed by the investigator in charge. At least whoever makes said claim must have seen some official document that broke these down into issue sub-groups so that a cogent analysis could be made.

    Without that it’s just blabber. I know I don’t make actionable policy based on blabber, poppy cock or water cooler talk.
     
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  7. gatornana

    gatornana Administrator Moderator VIP Member

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    The women from Central American countries seeking asylum for domestic abuse aren't protected by law enforcement and the government. Domestic violence against women is a human rights violation. We permit asylum for those who face danger in their home countries for political and religious reasons....it stands to reason those facing domestic violence are given the same consideration.

    A surging tide of violence sweeping across El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras forces thousands of women, men, and children to leave their homes every month. This region of Central America, known as the Northern Triangle (“Northern Triangle of Central America” or “NTCA”), is one of the most dangerous places on earth.3 The region has come under increasing control by sophisticated, organized criminal armed groups, often with transnational reach, driving up rates of murder, gender based violence, and other forms of serious harm. According to data from the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, Honduras ranks first, El Salvador fifth, and Guatemala sixth for rates of homicide globally.4 Furthermore, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras rank first, third, and seventh, respectively, for rates of female homicides globally. 5 In large parts of the territory, the violence has surpassed governments’ abilities to protect victims and provide redress.6 Certain parts of Mexico face similar challenges.7 Over the last few years, there has been a sharp escalation in the number of people fleeing the NTCA. In 2014, tens of thousands sought asylum in the United States,8 and the number of women crossing the US border was nearly three times higher than in 2013.9 Others have fled to neighboring countries. Combined, Mexico, Belize, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Panama have seen the number of asylum applications from citizens fleeing the NTCA grow to nearly 13 times what it was in 2008.10 An alarming feature of this refugee crisis is the number of children fleeing home, with their mothers or alone. Over 66,000 unaccompanied and separated children11 from the NTCA reached the United States in 2014.12

    Long read by a good one:
    http://www.unhcr.org/56fc31a37.pdf
     
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  8. OklahomaGator

    OklahomaGator Jedi Administrator Moderator VIP Member

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    I thought asylum was for political persecution.:confused::confused:
     
  9. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    This might be a stretch, but if citizens are denied protection by law enforcement and the government, isn't that kinda sorta political persecution?

    "We permit asylum for those who face danger in their home countries for political and religious reasons....it stands to reason those facing domestic violence are given the same consideration."
     
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  10. Claygator

    Claygator GC Hall of Fame

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    So now we have to sort out which countries don't do a good enough job--in our opinion-- protecting against domestic violence and grant victims from those countries asylum?

    Not buying it. And why only victims of domestic violence? Why not all crimes?
     
  11. oaklandroadie2

    oaklandroadie2 Sophomore

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    You are one of the most vocal posters when it comes to declaring that the US is not the world's policeman. Apparently you have no issue with us being the world's social worker?
     
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  12. oaklandroadie2

    oaklandroadie2 Sophomore

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    So, are the countries described in the linked expose, sh!thole countries?
     
  13. Tasselhoff

    Tasselhoff GC Hall of Fame

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    Is the ONLY answe asylum? Or could we/do we try to help in other ways? How much money, resources and people does the us send to other countries to help with domestic violence and sex trafficking?
    Just because we no longe offer asylum does not mean we have burned our back and walked away. How often do we hear that we shouldn’t be the worlds policeman? How often is our military slammed for intervention in other countries affairs? But opening up our doors to all of them to come here is ok?
     
  14. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    Not ALL crimes put people's lives in immediate danger. And if someone doesn't think that whuppin' up on the old lady isn't putting her life in danger, that someone needs to think again.
     
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  15. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    I think there is a difference between seeking them out and dragging them here as opposed to providing a safe place for them if they voluntarily come and ask for it.

    And if there were other methods to help these people, that would be great. It doesn't matter what the name of the method is, just have a method. I feel that assylum would be a good method, but I could be wrong. It's happened once. ONCE! :cool:
     
  16. Rocinante

    Rocinante Senior

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    Obviously you have never gone through this. I have dealt with a very violent brother-in-law, MD no less, the police are useless, court orders are useless. This person now has 4-5 felony assaults on his record, most against his mother and father. Never spent one day in prison, so you keep an eye on where this person is and prepare to remove him from society yourself. He’s been deemed schizophrenic and no longer has his medical license, but is still running around causing havoc. If an advanced country like ours can’t protect its own citizens, then what makes you believe a country like El Salvador has the ability.

    If the richest country in the world cannot help it’s own neighbors in a real crisis, then we don’t deserve to call ourselves the beacon of freedom and liberty. We certainly are not behaving like a Christian nation. More like a petulant rich child who refuses to share his toys with other less fortunate kids.
     
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  17. duchen

    duchen VIP Member

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    Our system now presumes asylum seekers are criminals and separates them from their children.
     
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  18. egator1245

    egator1245 Premium Member

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    If we can not protect our own citizens, how will we be able to protect others?
     
  19. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    Because our own abusers are in the same state, same town, hell many many times the same HOUSE as the victims, whereas an immigrant may be a thousand miles or more away. Distance does help in these situations. Hector can't just jump in the car or break down the door if Maria is a thousand miles away and he does not know where.
     
  20. Gatormb

    Gatormb GC Hall of Fame

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    Perhaps we should extend that asylum to women from not only South and Central America but women from Asia and the Middle East. Heck, might as well throw in the starving children from Africa.