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No football players are positive. Is this a good thing?

Discussion in 'RayGator's Swamp Gas' started by ncbullgator15, Aug 1, 2020.

  1. ncbullgator15

    ncbullgator15 Junior

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    It is highly likely that most kids between 20 and 30 will get the virus. For 99.9%, it should be nothing more than a three day inconvenience.

    Of course, no one wants to deliberately catch it.

    So far, breakouts have occurred at LSU, Clemson and Bama and others. All recovered. These teams should develop a herd immunity.

    But a mid season breakout for the Gators could be a disaster for our competitiveness.
     
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  2. 96Gatorcise

    96Gatorcise GC Hall of Fame

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    Herd immunity at this point is only an assumption of a new virus that has been around less than a year.
    A virus that has already proven not to follow assumed tendencies by going dormant/dying out in warmer temps. It will take one full season (if there even is a season for this) possibly two to calculate what is going to happen with any type of accuracy.

    And yes, any breakout during a sport season could be disastrous for a team. Look how it has already messed with MLB.
     
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  3. FearNoSpear

    FearNoSpear GC Hall of Fame

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    It hasn’t been around long enough to know the long term effects. Do we know if it causes permanent scarring to the lungs or anything like that? One may feel fine after three days but for a high level athlete any long term effect on the lungs could be detrimental.
     
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  4. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    On a call with SEC leaders, worried football players pushed back: ‘It’s not good enough’
    By Robert Klemko and Emily Giambalvo
    August 1, 2020 at 7:00 a.m. EDT
    College football’s most powerful conference, the SEC, announced Thursday that it plans to forge ahead with a season this fall. But a day earlier, in a private meeting with conference leaders and medical advisers, several football players raised concerns about their safety, only to be told that positive cases on their teams were a “given,” according to an audio recording obtained by The Washington Post.

    The meeting, which took place Wednesday, included more than a dozen SEC football players, members of the conference’s medical advisory board and SEC officials, including Commissioner Greg Sankey. It was designed as a “confidential free exchange,” an SEC spokesman said in an email, where the league’s medical advisers could “hear questions and our student-athletes were able to hear answers."

    But the recording offers a window into how conference officials — keen on keeping a multibillion dollar industry afloat amid the novel coronavirus pandemic — are, and aren’t, reassuring the athletes they need to make the season a reality.
    “There are going to be outbreaks,” one official told players on the call. (The official didn’t identify himself, and the SEC spokesman declined to identify him to The Post.) “We’re going to have cases on every single team in the SEC. That’s a given. And we can’t prevent it.”
    As the 2020 season barrels closer, several high-profile programs have already grappled with outbreaks. Some have had to temporarily suspend workouts, including Michigan State and Rutgers, which are both in isolation after several players tested positive.

    SEC narrows football season to 10 games per team, eliminates nonconference schedule

    Players in the SEC and other conferences have the option to opt out of this season and retain their scholarships. But so far just a handful of players at top schools have done so, preferring to skip the season and preserve a year of NCAA eligibility rather than risk infection.
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2020/08/01/sec-football-players-safety-meeting/
     
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  5. crl

    crl GC Hall of Fame

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    If immunity is conferred by contracting it, then probably not.
     
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  6. gatorbogey

    gatorbogey GC Hall of Fame

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    I like what George Washington did during a small pox epidemic during the Revolutionary War: actually infected his own troops with small doses of smallpox to build immunity.
     
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  7. crl

    crl GC Hall of Fame

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    If all our players opted out this year and no one went pro we’d kick ass next year as long as no one else good did the same thing IMO.
     
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  8. crl

    crl GC Hall of Fame

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    Probably what the gumps are doing. Along with other things no one else does.
     
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  9. GatorSean

    GatorSean GC Hall of Fame

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    It's going to require between 70-80% of a population to develop herd immunity for covid. A population isn't a football team, it's the entire surrounding community.

    If 80% of a football team has immunity, the remaining 20% can still get infected unless everyone they come into contact with also has immunity.

    No city, state, or team is anywhere even close to getting herd immunity.
     
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  10. defensewinschampionships

    defensewinschampionships GC Hall of Fame

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    What a great story for anyone interested in history. The concept of inoculation was in its infancy and an Austrian doctor who was run out of his own country for suggesting it pitched it to Washington and performed the inoculations.
     
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  11. defensewinschampionships

    defensewinschampionships GC Hall of Fame

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    Not to mention everyone who gets it doesn’t necessarily develop antibodies - case in point, me.
     
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  12. BLING

    BLING GC Hall of Fame

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    That would basically be a vaccine.
     
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  13. BLING

    BLING GC Hall of Fame

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    If all our NFL prospects redshirted and came back, and nobody else's did, we'd be good.

    Ya don't say. ;)

    [​IMG]
     
  14. gatorbogey

    gatorbogey GC Hall of Fame

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    Our body - immune system - is what makes vaccines work. To get immunity, have to catch it, or have bits of it injected. Washington was pretty wise. Get his troops immune before the battle! Don’t wait until the battle commences and your troops succumb.
     
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  15. KendallGator922

    KendallGator922 GC Hall of Fame

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    Vaccines utilize dead virus cells to trick the body into producing antibodies that pose no threat to the human body. Contrary to conspiracy theorists, you are not getting an active "small" dose of the virus.You are, however, getting several million nanites that can track you from Pluto.
     
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  16. ajoseph

    ajoseph Premium Member

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    He had no choice. If he didn’t take drastic action, the majority of his army, stationed together over the winter, would die. So, knowing roughy 5% of those inoculated would die, he forced inoculated the troops, and saved the majority to fight another day.

    Still, about 5% died. War is quite different than football in this regard.

    The inoculation was done by sticking a knife in an infected soldier’s sores, and then taking that knife and using a very small amount of that blood and sticking others with it. This was highlighted in a recent History Channel show in America and our ability to overcome life obstacles.
     
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  17. Crusher

    Crusher GC Hall of Fame

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    Not sure if they still are, but live, weakened virus vaccines have been common.
     
  18. BLING

    BLING GC Hall of Fame

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    Actually some vaccines do contain deactivated or weakened, but still technically "live" virus.

    Vaccine Types | Vaccines
     
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  19. your_perfect_enemy

    your_perfect_enemy GC Hall of Fame

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    Yes, not testing positive for the virus is a good thing
     
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  20. red4512

    red4512 Premium Member

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    Sad thing is I can can get more Corona virus info on these forums than from the CDC. Even sadder is I don't know which site is more accurate.
     
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