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Nick Rolovich Out As Washington State Coach for Refusing COVID-19 Vaccine

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by OklahomaGator, Oct 18, 2021.

  1. mdgator05

    mdgator05 Premium Member

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    Not really. A government mandate that you do something in theory is not in violation of Catholic teachings. The only way you could argue it would be is to argue that you have a religious exemption that the vaccine violates your religious beliefs. There is some fight in the church over whether there should be mandates, but many diocese are actually requiring their employees or clergy to become vaccinated (i.e., engaging in a mandate).
     
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  2. DoubleDown11

    DoubleDown11 GC Hall of Fame

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    He has 4 kids and just forfeited their generational wealth.
     
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  3. slightlyskeptic

    slightlyskeptic GC Hall of Fame

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    While I admire a man who has the courage of his convictions I question his decision making skills.
     
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  4. GatorBen

    GatorBen Premium Member

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    I’m actually not sure that in this instance “the formal Catholic Church does not oppose vaccination” should be the be all, end all of that inquiry.

    As I understand it, the “Catholic objection” would be that the JNJ vaccine was developed using a fetal cell line that was originally derived from an abortion, while the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines were tested on a separate fetal cell line that was also originally derived from an abortion.

    I get the church’s position that the abortions the fetal cell lines were originally derived from were performed in the 1970s and 1980s, and that we are now far enough removed from them that the mere use of a fetal cell line (that was originally derived from something that is unequivocally a sin under Catholic teachings) is not in and of itself reason enough to forego a potentially life saving treatment. But if he sincerely believes that using a treatment that was developed or tested using a cell line derived from an abortion is morally wrong and violates his religious beliefs, I don’t know that I’m necessarily comfortable with “not according to the Pope it doesn’t, denied, next” being the sole determinant of whether he qualifies for an exemption or not.
     
  5. dangolegators

    dangolegators GC Hall of Fame

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    What a dummy.
     
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  6. mdgator05

    mdgator05 Premium Member

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    The church has officially declared it morally acceptable to use the vaccines. In fact, I think that there is a stronger argument that continued employment without a vaccine is not in keeping with the moral teaching of the church, as he would not be doing his utmost to prevent himself from becoming a vehicle of transmission of the infectious agent. You could certainly argue that he should be staying at home if he refused the vaccine, under church guidance.
     
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  7. GatorBen

    GatorBen Premium Member

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    I get what the church has said, I just think it’s a bit difficult to make that the decisive factor for deciding whether his objection stems from sincerely held religious beliefs or not.

    If he thinks the use of fetal cell lines in the development of COVID vaccines makes their use morally objectionable, it might make him a “bad Catholic” for elevating his own judgment of his conscience over the formal views of the Pope or the Conference of a Catholic Bishops, but I don’t know that it necessarily makes it not a sincerely held religious belief. That’s all my point was.
     
  8. gator_lawyer

    gator_lawyer Premium Member

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    Sounds like a sincerely held moral belief, not a sincerely held religious belief. If the Pope says get vaccinated, that's the freaking Pope.
     
  9. mdgator05

    mdgator05 Premium Member

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    Yeah, I get your point that it is always difficult for government to assess sincerely held religious beliefs. I'd just argue that if you are actually going against the moral teachings of your religion, there would really need to be a lot of evidence to back your claim, in my opinion. For example, has he taken any of the other vaccinations under the same guidance from the church due to the same testing issue? I feel like the threshold for proving that a belief is sincerely held is quite a bit higher if your religion is arguing the opposite position, essentially.
     
  10. mutz87

    mutz87 p=.06 VIP Member

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    ...where he didn't want to do his part protecting others at a public U as well as himself.
     
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  11. gatorgrl76

    gatorgrl76 VIP Member

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    Tell that to my dead brother and my dead cousin.
     
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  12. gator_lawyer

    gator_lawyer Premium Member

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  13. demosthenes

    demosthenes Premium Member

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    I understand the bitterness but the logic and implication is quite flawed.
     
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  14. citygator

    citygator VIP Member

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    Charlotte
    How’s we ever get rid of polio? Oh, Trumpers weren’t stupid yet.
     
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  15. BLING

    BLING GC Hall of Fame

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    But what are these “religious grounds”? He’s so principled, he’s using a phony pretext.

    Reminds me of an incident I once observed at the National Archives in DC. They make all visitors go through metal detectors. In front of us were a large group of Orthodox Jews (although they were dressed relatively normally) who refused to go through them, they wanted a “religious exemption” to go around the metal detectors. Meanwhile they were holding up the line and causing a huge embarrassing scene.

    The claim was they weren’t allowed to set off any electrical devices on the Shabbat. The security wasn’t budging, responding “you’ll only set it off if you are carrying something”. Which of course triggered the guy. Keep in mind this guy has like 30 students with him, so I assume he’s some sort of teacher and it turned into a huge embarrassing scene, even people in the line yelling at him to just go away if he refused to
    go through the checkpoint.

    In his mind, I’m sure he thought he was also making a pious stand. But no, he was really just a fruitcake who caused a scene for nothing.
     
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  16. GCNumber7

    GCNumber7 GC Hall of Fame

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    Did he ever give any insight into why he is so against being vaccinated? Clearly the religious exception is some late Hail Mary to try and save his job without actually complying.

    On the surface it may sound like an admirable principled stance. But without understanding his position and given how many people are impacted by his decision, it sounds more like arrogance, stubbornness and not liking being told what to do. Even when it clearly hurts his team. Sounds familiar?
     
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  17. AndyGator

    AndyGator GC Hall of Fame

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    or political. Which would be a totally dumb reason to lose one's job.
     
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  18. OklahomaGator

    OklahomaGator Jedi Administrator Moderator VIP Member

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    I don't think the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines used the "fetal cells" in their development, so he could have taken those vaccines. My nephew is a Catholic Priest and that is what he advised his parishioners.
     
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  19. duchen

    duchen VIP Member

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    Setting off the metal detectors would violate Shabbat proscriptions. Some synagogues have metal detectors that do not violate proscriptions. The correct response is to not go through the detector, but is not to abuse the guards if they don’t allow a pat down in lieu of using the detector. Btw: it is not a “religious exemption” to allow them to go around the metal detector. Because the metro detector does not interfere with Observance. You can equally observe by leaving, so the analogy doesn’t apply. Like avoiding an electronic door on the Sabbath
     
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  20. duchen

    duchen VIP Member

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    We don’t know what the claimed religious exemption is. Or why he claims it. Not good to speculate.
     
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