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New CDC guidance

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by oragator1, May 13, 2021.

  1. BLING

    BLING GC Hall of Fame

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    Do you think the Moderna or Pfizer scientists worked for Trump or something? What is his connection to any of it? If you think Trump deserves credit for vaccine development then yes, you are unaware of the history of mRNA vaccine technology... which goes back decades. Did you know Moderna was working on their platform since 2010? The technology was ready, basically just waiting for the appropriate use case. Thank goodness for that! The same technology is now potentially going to be used in other vaccines.

    Career people in the govt don’t even work “for” the President, they work for the govt under a broad policy the executive branch is supposed to generally set. Politicians should have almost no sway over professional agencies like DOJ or CDC, if they do it’s probably corruption or misinformation! And that admin was balls to the wall corruption and misinformation 24/7/365. It’s ludicrous to give a POTUS credit for something private business accomplished, even if it was done with some govt grants or at the end stage done with financial guarantees to speed distribution.

    Notice I don’t give Biden any credit either. Not for vaccine development or distribution, because that would be equally ludicrous. All he did was improve the WH messaging from deranged, to somewhat competent and in line with science.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 14, 2021
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  2. l_boy

    l_boy 5500

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    Why are so many republicans against the shot? It definitely runs partly lines.

    Was chatting with a neighbor, older couple, really nice older, couple, we don't chat much. I think he is about 75. I've seen republican signs in his yard before. In passing he mentioned he didn't need vaccine. He even has an immunocompromised disabled son who cant take the vaccine. You would think that would be more reason for the couple to take the vaccine.

    It is just so bizarre.
     
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  3. tbtwnsnd

    tbtwnsnd Premium Member

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    If you’re a grown adult and not vaccinated and get sick. That is 100 % on you now.
     
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  4. g8trjax

    g8trjax GC Hall of Fame

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    Got to add the already had covid people into the equation. Multiple millions probably?
     
  5. BLING

    BLING GC Hall of Fame

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    Sure, but immunity is not life long. A person that had it last year could already be susceptible to reinfection, and very little resistance against the new variants. Eventually that will probably be true for vaccinated people too.
     
  6. oragator1

    oragator1 Premium Member

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  7. gator10010

    gator10010 GC Hall of Fame

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    If the government will just mail me the vaccine and ID card, then I will inject the vaccine and sign confirmation that I have taken the vaccine and mail it back, just don't check the signature.

    I promise it will work.
     
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  8. gator10010

    gator10010 GC Hall of Fame

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    Weird, I never thought me getting Covid was going to be anyone else's fault before the vaccine.

    You're telling me that since January 2020 until now that I wasn't responsible for myself?
     
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  9. ncargat1

    ncargat1 VIP Member

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    I think a lot of it started with a response to pollution driven illness. But, more recently the need to protect themselves and their communities against repeated epidemics and outbreaks has been more the driving force. From the bird flu, to H1N1 to SARS-CoV-1 and now SARS-CoV-2.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2021
  10. tampagtr

    tampagtr VIP Member

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    Thanks. I've not read too much on it so I'm not very well informed. Appreciate the extra information and context
     
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  11. Gator715

    Gator715 GC Hall of Fame

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    Good reminder that science is a field of study, a process, not an institution.

    If you've been following the data, you've known this for a while. The CDC just decided to announce it now.
     
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  12. BLING

    BLING GC Hall of Fame

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    I can think of many scenarios where it would be someone else’s fault prior to the vaccine (particularly if it involved a known infected person acting like a dumbass, or health workers having poor sanitation, or people in general not following basic guidelines).

    After the vaccine the math changes drastically. If an individual didn’t want to get vaccinated, and gets infected, that is 100% on them. Personal responsibility. Under the slim chance a person did get fully vaccinated and gets seriously ill somehow (this has happened to a few thousand already including 100+ deaths), that isn’t on them, its just bad luck. Or it could actually still be someone else’s fault (if the person that infected them was a bad actor from the type of scenarios above).
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2021
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  13. Gator715

    Gator715 GC Hall of Fame

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    Yeah, you can still get COVID after you have been vaccinated.

    But you can also get struck by lightning every time you go outside in the rain.

    The point is, it's rare. And it's especially rare for you to get a life-threatening affliction of COVID after being vaccinated twice and being relatively young.
     
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  14. Gator715

    Gator715 GC Hall of Fame

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    Based on personal observations Republicans against the vaccine generally comes from this low perceived risk of COVID, which is accurate in some cases, inaccurate in others. It largely depends on your situation. In the situation you mentioned, a low perceived risk of COVID seems inaccurate to me.

    I think Democrats who hesitate to take the vaccine are more along the lines of young or safe people who don't see their life changing much post-vaccine. Like they hear and see the media talking about all of these risks post-vaccine so they think to themselves "what's the point?"

    The people terrified of COVID seem more than likely to get the vaccine no matter what.

    I'm pretty young and relatively low risk and my whole family is vaccinated so I wouldn't have gone out of my way to get it if it didn't open doors for traveling and such. I basically got it because "why not," but I certainly wasn't rushing or overly excited to take it because I don't feel threatened by COVID based on my family circumstances and based on my medical profile.
     
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  15. gatorchamps960608

    gatorchamps960608 GC Legend

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    Being vaccinated means a very, very long shot of being hospitalized or dying from the virus.

    FYI, the Governor of VA still can't smell or taste anything 8 months after recovering from Covid. It's more than just a sickness and death problem.
     
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  16. ncargat1

    ncargat1 VIP Member

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    Actually, the CDC did not just "decide to announce" anything. The CDC finally received the data from the interim readpoint on Real World Effectiveness of mRNA vaccines in the United States this past week. The study tracked over 1800 front line responders for several months across 33 cities. The data, only just published this week in the MMWR, showed that the front line workers who were fully vaccinated with a mRNA vaccine were 94% less likely to become infected. Further, the data showed that they were 82% less likely to be infect after just one shot. In short, the mRNA vaccines are exceeding everyone's wildest expectations and hopes in real world settings.

    This data was the basis in the change of guidance issued by the CDC on Thursday. I understand that everyone thinks that they know the answers, but I am perfectly happy to allow the CDC to issue guidance based on actual data that they can stand behind and not have guess or walk back, regardless of how emotionally charged a particular issue has become.

    Interim Estimates of Vaccine Effectiveness of Pfizer-BioNTech ...

    [​IMG]
     
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  17. GatorBen

    GatorBen Premium Member

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    To be fair, that’s because of the white hood covering his mouth and nose, not the COVID.

    ;)
     
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  18. tbtwnsnd

    tbtwnsnd Premium Member

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    no but the vaccine has been available for several months now. I’m not talking about in January when it wasn’t available but to front line workers.
     
  19. fubar1

    fubar1 Premium Member

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    As long as Biden passes a big tax on fast food and high sugar beverages, I’m good with a vaccine tax break.
     
  20. fubar1

    fubar1 Premium Member

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    Real-time Darwinism is defined as healthy people under 65 with a < one-tenth of one percent chance of dying from COVID deciding not to vax up?

    Who knew
     
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