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Myth of the kindly General Lee

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by studegator, Jul 21, 2019.

  1. GatorNavy

    GatorNavy Tally me banana Moderator VIP Member

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    I am not sure why you disagreed with what I stated but I am correct. The only point I made was that Robert E. Lee assumed command of Confederate forces in 1862 replacing Joe Johnston who was wounded at the Battle of Seven Pines.
     
  2. madgator

    madgator GC Hall of Fame

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    There was a second point about who was considered the Confederates best field general who was killed in battle. That point got crossed with the leader of the army of northern virginia.
     
  3. wgbgator

    wgbgator Extremely Online Premium Member

    ASJ was killed at Shiloh, never commanded the Army of NVA
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. CaptUSMCNole

    CaptUSMCNole GC Hall of Fame

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    I don't think that is a very fair assessment. Lee was a stand out during the Mexican American War and General Winfield Scott had him as one of his staff officers. While Lee won early in the war, he still is the one who was in charge at the time and had final approval of the battle plan. General Hindenburg once said that his entire staff knew the plan for the Eastern campaign was all developed by Lundendorff but he still claimed credit for the victory since he would have been blamed for a defeat. Same for Lee early in the Civil War.

    Lee was dealt a terrible hand militarily and logistically but played it as well as anyone from that time period could have. West Point and the US Army was teaching the military philosophy of Jomini and that shaped a lot of the action of generals on both sides. Lee eventually realized that his only chance to win would be a defeat of the Union Army on Union soil and forcing a surrounded of DC since if the war continued to drag out, the Union would eventually win with manpower and industrial might. He gambled on going North twice and lost both times.