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Manafort sentenced

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by danmann65, Mar 13, 2019.

  1. danmann65

    danmann65 GC Hall of Fame

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    Manafort was just sentenced. It seems that combined he will serve a little over 7 years. I honestly dont know the ends and outside of sentencing but it still seems pretty light compared to the predictions.
     
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  2. CaptUSMCNole

    CaptUSMCNole GC Hall of Fame

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    I wonder if you take the politics out of it, that is within the norm for what he was convicted of doing?
     
  3. 108

    108 Premium Member

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    NYS just indicted him on a bunch of charges...no potential pardon for these..
     
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  4. staticgator

    staticgator All American

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  5. BigCroc

    BigCroc Premium Member

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    Good question, some who post here may have a better feel for that. The combined sentence seems somewhat light to me given what the federal sentencing guidelines called for in the first case, but I don't know how often federal judges depart downward from the guidelines in similar cases.

    If the sentences are on par with the norm for similarly situated defendants it does lend credence to the notion that it is far better to steal millions than to commit garden variety crimes of theft or sell small amounts of drugs to make your money under our federal justice system.
     
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  6. danmann65

    danmann65 GC Hall of Fame

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    Very good question. The press seems to want this whole administration to be strung up. They seem to lack objectivity. I am waiting for the condemnation of this judge for being a Republican shill. It got a little thick after Manafort's first sentencing. Never heard he was a Republican until he sentenced him.
     
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  7. BobK89

    BobK89 GC Hall of Fame

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    More importantly, what are the fines that have been assessed.

    "The best way to hurt rich people is to make them poor people." Billy Ray Valentine, "Trading Places"
     
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  8. fredsanford

    fredsanford Premium Member

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    He already was hit with asset forfeiture and today got hit with another $6M in fines.
     
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  9. fredsanford

    fredsanford Premium Member

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    This is the endgame for all of them that committed crimes in NY, VA or other places. There will be no escaping justice one way or another.
     
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  10. BobK89

    BobK89 GC Hall of Fame

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    DAMN!!
     
  11. WarDamnGator

    WarDamnGator GC Hall of Fame

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    From his lawyer:

    Downing said he is “disappointed” in the sentence.

    “I think the judge showed that she is incredibly hostile towards Mr. Manafort and exhibited a level of callousness that I have not seen in a white color case in over fifteen years of prosecution,” he said.

    I'm guessing .. hoping ... "White color case" was a misprint
     
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  12. mutz87

    mutz87 Complexified VIP Member

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    Berman Jackson's sentence seems to have been w/in the range, Ellis' sentence was not. His was a large downward departure.

    The legit questions about the earlier sentence is whether or not Ellis departed downward in a similar way for others and if not, why Manafort?
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2019
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  13. fredsanford

    fredsanford Premium Member

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    Prior real estate forfeiture estimated at $22M including a Trump Tower condo.
     
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  14. BobK89

    BobK89 GC Hall of Fame

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    any word if they're going to garnishee his prison commissary account?
     
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  15. Bazza

    Bazza GC Hall of Fame

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    If you can't do the time....don't do the crime.....
     
  16. ThePlayer

    ThePlayer VIP Member

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    Pardon me?
     
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  17. Gatorrick22

    Gatorrick22 GC Hall of Fame

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    That say it all... :rolleyes:
     
  18. VAg8r1

    VAg8r1 GC Hall of Fame

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  19. PerSeGator

    PerSeGator GC Legend

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    About 50% of cases are within the guidelines range, 30% are below on motion of the government (due to cooperation), and the remaining 20% are below guidelines without government support. Only something like 2-3% go above guidelines (coming from the margins of my rough figures).

    Most of us in the defense bar agree that Ellis's sentence was extraordinarily lenient under the circumstances. Generally I would not expect a variance that large (without cooperation) unless the defendant had absolutely impeccable character and major community contributions to go along with other mitigating circumstances.

    For instance, in some white collar cases an executive of a public company might commit a crime on behalf of the company where the total "loss" is astronomical just due to the size of the business. Although the defendant himself might receive little direct benefit from the crime, he is nonetheless hit with a 30+ year guidelines calculation, because the guidelines focus on the loss due to the conduct, rather than the benefit gained by the defendant. The same idea might apply to a conspiracy where the defendant, while culpable, not really the driving force behind the scheme, and not the one that would be the primary beneficiary of the stolen/fraudulent funds.

    Those are circumstances where a court might decide that the loss "overstates" the seriousness of the offense, and give a big departure. Not something that really applies to Manafort as far as I am aware. In fact, I struggle to see any legitimate reason for a significant downward departure, beyond just a generalized disagreement with the guidelines (which isn't reflected in any of Ellis's other sentencings). If I had a client that went to trial, lost, pleaded guilty to additional charges, and then not only refuse to accept responsibility, but broke his plea agreement and lied to the government in the process, I would have every expectation of a high guidelines sentence. I certainly would never expect the court to give a sentence below the major departure I asked for.
     
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  20. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    I just heard that they piled on charges for mortgage fraud. Mortgage fraud isn't against the law, is it? Since when?:rolleyes:
     
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