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Maine families face elder boom, worker shortage in preview of nation’s future

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by studegator, Aug 15, 2019.

  1. studegator

    studegator All American

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    https://www.washingtonpost.com/busi...ecafc6-bec1-11e9-b873-63ace636af08_story.html

    This will be catastrophic’: Maine families face elder boom, worker shortage in preview of nation’s future
    Flaherty’s mother, Caroline, has for two years qualified for in-home care paid for by the state’s Medicaid program. But the agency could not find someone to hire amid a severe shortage of workers that has crippled facilities for seniors across the state.

    With private help now bid up to $50 an hour, Janet and her two sisters have been forced to do what millions of families in a rapidly aging America have done: take up second, unpaid jobs caring full time for their mother.

    “We do not know what to do. We do not know where to go. We are in such dire need of help,” said Flaherty, an insurance saleswoman.
    The disconnect between Maine’s aging population and its need for young workers to care for that population is expected to be mirrored in states throughout the country over the coming decade, demographic experts say. And that’s especially true in states with populations with fewer immigrants, who are disproportionately represented in many occupations serving the elderly, statistics show.
     
  2. gatornana

    gatornana Administrator Moderator VIP Member

    Apr 3, 2007
    A consequence of Trump's immigration policy. Americans will have to roll up their sleeves and take care of their aging parents.
     
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  3. NavyGator93

    NavyGator93 GC Legend

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    A large percentage of elder healthcare workers are immigrants. Will be interesting to see how that works out.
     
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  4. QGator2414

    QGator2414 VIP Member

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    You really think this happened due to policy over the last two years? Wow if so.

    That said...what a concept? Take care of your Parents/Family!

    Now back track 80/90 years and you will see that policies of dependence on government will create the idea that we should not take care of our Parents/Family because government should. :cool:
     
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  5. QGator2414

    QGator2414 VIP Member

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    And it is Cold in Maine. Maybe global warming will make it a place people want to live year round. Have heard it is an amazing state and I look forward to taking the kids there. But I have no desire to live in that kind of cold in the winter. I would suspect they will find it hard to bring in the help unless they are going to pay extra...
     
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  6. dangolegators

    dangolegators GC Hall of Fame

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    Yeah we should just go back to letting them go hungry and having no access to healthcare. They'll die younger, problem solved.
     
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  7. QGator2414

    QGator2414 VIP Member

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    Typical I can’t help my family so let’s force entire younger generations to do so for me instead of creating a system that does help those who cannot help themselves and let’s Families do their job.

    Not hard to figure out why the Family Unit has been in decline for decades with your kind of position (government>family).
     
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  8. AzCatFan

    AzCatFan GC Hall of Fame

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    The US population is aging. It's not people weren't taking care of their aging parents before. It was there were less elderly and enough paid caretakers to take care of them. The shift to an older population means there is a higher demand for elderly care workers. Traditionally, about 30% of all in-care healthcare workers are immigrants. So home health senior care is a market with higher demand every year, but supply that isn't keeping up. And it's not just happening in Maine, but other states too.

    It should be a simple fix. If there's a demand for immigrant workers, let supply meet it with an expanded guest worker visa.
     
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  9. mutz87

    mutz87 C'est Moi VIP Member

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    Evidence that it "created the idea?"

    All the problems you seem to assume are government's entire fault might rightly be attributed to our adolescent views about capitalism where its *success* (read failure) has been in creating great wealth and a mindset that any sense of public good be damned.
     
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  10. QGator2414

    QGator2414 VIP Member

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    This one absolutely is on the government. And look no farther than dangoles position that if government does not give everyone money instead of just those in need that people will go hungry and die younger. That is what entitlement mentality is verse Relying on Family and if there is no one there to help someone then yes...support the government helping out. But that is not what SS/Medicare/Obamacare for that matter are. They are redistribution programs that create entitlement. And it leads to people relying on it rather than having the conviction that it is our responsibility to take care of our Parents/Family first. It is not and should not be the responsibility of the person living paycheck to paycheck right now unless there is no one there (Family/Community).

    Hence the Family Unit has been struggling mightily.
     
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  11. dangolegators

    dangolegators GC Hall of Fame

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    The elderly poor 80/90 years ago were living in horrendous conditions. It's not that people don't want to take care of their parents (though some don't and that's nothing new). It's that people can't afford to take care of their parents and that's nothing new as well. The system we've created with SS and Medicare has been a huge success. It's just that many of our more fortunate citizens don't want to subsidize our less fortunate ones so that's why we constantly hear the kind of stuff QGator is saying.
     
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  12. QGator2414

    QGator2414 VIP Member

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    I don’t disagree with the idea of this. Though we need to put some accountability on our own work capable citizens not working as well.
     
  13. mdgator05

    mdgator05 Premium Member

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    He asked for evidence. None of this is evidence. It is just a string of unsupported opinions.
     
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  14. VAg8r1

    VAg8r1 GC Hall of Fame

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    Taking care of one's aged parents may have been a viable option 80 or 90 years ago when adult children lived within close proximity of their aging parents. 80 or 90 years ago it was not uncommon for multiple generations to live in the same residence. That's really not the case of anymore. As a personal example my wife and I live in the DC metro area. Our parents, who have since passed away lived in South Florida. Additionally, thanks to advances in medical care it's not that unusual although probably not the norm for elderly individuals with severe physical problems and/or forms of dementia to require round the clock care over a period of many years. That situation occurred much less frequently decades ago.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2019
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  15. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    Yeah I mean who's going to changing my diapers next year? I don't have any children (that I know of ;)) so what's a geezer going to do???
     
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  16. VAg8r1

    VAg8r1 GC Hall of Fame

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    Ironically, but perhaps not surprising the immigrants who change adult diapers and empty bedpans tend to be have less formal education and very often immigrate to the US from third world (sometime referred to as s-hole) countries. Trump's proposal to change the mix of immigrants by giving preference to more educated immigrants would farther exacerbate the shortage of caregivers for the elderly. As a point of information, in a column in the NY Times around a year ago Tom Friedman suggested that we increase legal immigration at both the high end (more skilled educated immigrants) and the low end (less educated immigrants who are willing to work hard at jobs that Americans refuse to do).
    Opinion | We Need a High Wall With a Big Gate
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2019
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  17. G8trGr8t

    G8trGr8t Premium Member

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    spend some of that money you saved all those years by not having kids?
     
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  18. QGator2414

    QGator2414 VIP Member

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    I get you don’t want to accept and see it. And it is a bipartisan problem. Definitely worse on the left. But if you can’t see the lack of regard for marriage and the how common the broken home is today compared to the past...it is because you refuse to acknowledge it. I get you do not like the reality that giving people other people’s money will affect how they act. But that is exactly what has happened. Hence we hear grandma will go hungry and die early if dangole and others have to actually step up and take care of their Parents/Family if capable of doing so.

    SS would have been fine if created as a noble program. It was not. Neither was Medicare. But yes people love them as they get way more than they paid for on the backs of younger generations. Many of whom will live paycheck to paycheck in providing such redistribution.
     
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  19. mdgator05

    mdgator05 Premium Member

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    None of this is evidence either. Evidence is factual pieces of information. This is still unsupported opinion. You made an empirically testable, causal claim. Do you have any factual information to back any of this or just opinions piled on other opinions?

    BTW, the divorce rate has been falling for decades (it peaked right at the beginning of the 1980s that you were glorifying in another thread). That is a factual piece of evidence.

    [​IMG]
     
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  20. QGator2414

    QGator2414 VIP Member

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    And that is reasoning to force others to provide care for your family? This idea that your Parents could not have moved to DC if necessary because of health issues is part of the problem.

    Now maybe you agree maybe not. But end of life care needs to be addressed as tough of an issue as it is. And the government is a huge part of the problem here again. Yes advancements help keep people alive longer. But it also has people fighting a losing battle. My grandfather spent the last 6 weeks of his life miserable and wanting to end it. But Medicare and Osceola Regional did what they could to keep him alive and bill out code after code during that time instead of sending him home to home hospice. No doubt his wife not wanting to let go was part of the decision. At the end of the day it was really frustrating to watch him in pain with a majority of hospital personnel who really need to find a new profession (I would never set foot in Osceola Regional unless had to from not being in condition to choose).