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Has anyone set up a 'slave' router with Comcast?

Discussion in 'Gator Bytes' started by GatorTheo, Jul 16, 2019.

  1. GatorTheo

    GatorTheo Sophomore

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    If so, ya got any working detailed instructions? Either I just haven't stumbled across the correct IP settings or it just won't work with the xfinity router.

    My xfinity ip is 10.0.0.1

    The dhcp range is 2-253

    My slave router is set up as 192.168.1.1

    I've tried many combination that all end up failing. I can't even complete the setup for the slave. Getting repeated linksys errors 2197 and 2199.

    Gracias.
     
  2. LakeGator

    LakeGator Mostly Harmless Moderator VIP Member

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    Have you tried placing the slave on the same subnet as the master router? Something like 10.0.0.254. This article describes the need to be on the same subnet.
     
  3. ValdostaGatorFan

    ValdostaGatorFan GC Hall of Fame

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    What are you trying to accomplish?

    If you are trying to extend your wireless signal, just get a wireless access point and assign it outside your DHCP scope. Assuming your 10.0.0.0 network is a standard class A, you should be able to use any address from 10.0.0.254 through 10.255.255.254. If you are extending your wifi connection, put it on the same subnet as your home router and name the SSID (wifi name) as the same. May want to go into the configs and put them on separate channels.

    If this is for something else, your slave probably needs a default route entry to your other router.
     
  4. ValdostaGatorFan

    ValdostaGatorFan GC Hall of Fame

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    Also, if you are just using it as an access point, and not actually routing, I would:

    Make sure your 10.0.0.0 network is a class A, if so, your subnet mask would be 255.0.0.0. You can get on a computer on your network, one that's getting DHCP info, and open a command prompt (run > CMD). Type in ipconfig /all and verify your subnet mask, default gateway, and DNS servers.

    Log into your 2nd router and statically assign it an IP address on your 10.0.0.0 network. If you have no other statically assigned devices on your network, 10.0.0.255 will work (assuming your subnet mask is 255.0.0.0). Wouldn't hurt to ping that address from a computer on your network just to make sure it isn't in use.

    In the config of your 2nd router, there's probably a setting to use it as an access point only. That's what ya need.

    If your IP settings are correct, and you name your SSID the same as your existing SSID, you should be able to plug your 2nd router into your network and use it's wireless access point. You will only see that 1 SSID listed in your wifi section, but there's actually 2 and your devices will automagically connect to the one that's strongest as you roam around your home.
     
  5. GatorTheo

    GatorTheo Sophomore

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    I'm trying to create a wired access point (out of a Linksys EA8500 router) to get good wifi to the back of the house. I set the access point ip to 10.0.0.2 (within the dhcp range of the main router) and turned off dhcp. It 'works' but is only producing about 20% of the speed of the main router. I do have the wifi names different....one for both bands of the main router.....one for both bands of the access point. The main router is apparently hard set to choose the best channel. I don't really remember what I did for the channels on the access point.

    It's been frustrating because there's so much confusing and sometimes conflicting info from internet experts. Same with linksys and Comcast 'technical support'.
     
  6. ValdostaGatorFan

    ValdostaGatorFan GC Hall of Fame

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    That looks like a really nice router. It sucks that you're having trouble with it. From your post, it looks like you have it hardwired to your main router when you called it a wired access point, is that correct? this may sound dumb, but have you tested the cabling? Unplug your router and plug it into your laptop. Does that performance still suck?

    And does wireless sucks on both bands of router 2? I would definitely be using wireless AC, or Wireless N on 5Ghz. 2.4Ghz has a high potential of interference.
     
  7. GatorTheo

    GatorTheo Sophomore

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    My main router:

    IP/default gateway 10.0.0.1 (I think that means class A)
    SN mask 255.255.255.0
    DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:558:feed::1
    2001:558:feed::2
    75.75.75.75
    75.75.76.76

    2nd router does not have access point setting. It does have something named NAT that one source said to turn off.
     
  8. ValdostaGatorFan

    ValdostaGatorFan GC Hall of Fame

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    If this were me, I would follow these instructions. It sounds like it's what you are trying to do.

    Setting up your Linksys Smart Wi-Fi Router to Bridge Mode is done for these purposes:

    • When your Internet Service Provider (ISP) requires it.
    • When you want to connect two (2) routers with the capability of sharing network resources like file and printer sharing.
    • When you want to use the router as an additional access point on an existing network.
    • When you need to disable the router functionalities to work with third party devices.
    • When you need to solve Network Address Translation (NAT) issues. This happens when a modem-router encounters an IP Address conflict with Linksys routers or experiences a strict NAT setting which is not ideal for online gaming.
    Linksys Official Support - Setting up your Linksys Smart Wi-Fi Router to Bridge Mode using your Linksys cloud account

    Other than that, again if it were me, I would do something about the 2nd router/access point's IP address. . Its bad practice to have a static IP address in the DHCP range. You said your DHCP range is 10.0.0.2 through 10.0.0.253. I would make the 2nd router 10.0.0.254. That is outside of DHCP range, so you never have to worry about a duplicate address. Just make sure theres not already a device at 10.0.0.254 already. You can't use 10.0.0.255 for anything as that is reserved as the broadcast address for that network.

    Also, you have a class C network in reality. 10.x.x.x networks are usually Class A networks subnetted as 255.0.0.0 and are huge networks. You have a network of 10.0.0.x since you have a 255.255.255.0 subnet mask. You can't use 10.0.0.0 for anything, and you can't use 10.0.0.255 for anything. Everything in between is fair game, except for your router that is already 10.0.0.1.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2019
  9. GatorTheo

    GatorTheo Sophomore

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    Thanks, y'all. Bridge mode seems to be doing what I need.
     
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  10. ValdostaGatorFan

    ValdostaGatorFan GC Hall of Fame

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    Bam! Good to hear.