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Florida History: What if Roosevelt had been killed in Miami?

Discussion in 'GatorTail Pub' started by gatorjjh, May 16, 2019.

  1. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Florida History: What do you know about Castillo de San Marcos, Florida’s oldest man-made structure?
    You can’t visit St. Augustine without exploring Florida’s oldest man-made structure, the Castillo de San Marcos. Welcome to Florida Time, our weekly column about Florida history.
    Readers: In a state that embodies transience, Castillo de San Marcos -- Florida’s oldest man-made structure and America’s oldest fort -- wears its age proudly.

    Up to a million people a year cross its drawbridge without incident. But over three centuries, raiders have tried, and failed, to take the four-sided fort on Matanzas Bay.

    Sir Francis Drake torched the city in 1586, but it wasn’t until the British sacked the town again in 1668 that leaders decided their wooden forts were inadequate.
    Work started four years later and it took two decades to build the structure, mostly with coquina blocks -- compressed mixtures of oyster shells and lime mined from the adjacent Anastasia Island.

    Florida Time archives: Get caught up on the stories you’ve missed

    Florida History: What do you know about Castillo de San Marcos, Florida's oldest man-made structure?
     
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  2. lacuna

    lacuna The Conscience of Too Hot Moderator VIP Member

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    Love that city and the old fort. An aspect of the Florida dear to my heart. Thanks for the link, J.
     
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  3. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    a few years back when we were living part time in Palm Coast I used to pick up my grandkids and head up to St Aug after school loved the fort and the main street (4 or 5 ice cream shops :) )
     
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  4. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Florida History: Before Disney, there was Dick Pope and his Cypress Gardens
    This week, on Florida Time, we revisit Florida’s first theme park, Cypress Gardens in Winter Haven, from a 1994 Palm Beach Post article and the book “Historical Traveler’s Guide to Florida.”
    When Walt Disney’s empire only was a little mouse, Dick Pope was birthing Florida’s modern tourism industry on 16 acres of swamp.
    Pope would be called an “aquatic Barnum.″ But he was called worse by naysayers when he opened Cypress Gardens, Florida’s first theme park, on Jan. 2, 1936. At 25 cents a head, his first day’s take was $38 -- meaning he saw at most 152 people.
    Spreading from a giant lake where ski shows went on, rain or shine, the park boasted more than 8,000 varieties of plants and flowers from 75 countries, a 5,500-square-foot conservatory housing about 1,000 butterflies, a 153-foot high “island in the sky” revolving platform, museums, shops and restaurants, and children’s rides and games.
    Read more Florida history: Fountain of Youth isn’t backed by historical evidence but keep reading

    Florida History: Before Disney, there was Dick Pope and his Cypress Gardens
     
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  5. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Folk festival celebrates Florida for 67th year
    From the GvlSun By Kyle Wood / Correspondent
    In a state defined by its beaches and tourists, the Florida Folk Festival celebrates those who call the state home far away from any of the sandy shores that surround the peninsula and attract its many visitors.

    The oldest state-produced festival in the country celebrates its 67th year Memorial Day weekend at the Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park in White Springs. Musicians, artists and performers from across the region will converge along the banks of the Suwannee River to commemorate the Sunshine State Friday through Sunday.

    “In a state where we have more than 100 million visitors a year, who you are as a Floridian, what does it mean to have the culture of Florida and where you find the definition of that — it’s White Springs, Florida, every year,” said Tom Shed, a long-time festival performer and spokesman.
    Folk festival celebrates Florida for 67th year
     
  6. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Florida History: The biggest hurricanes to hit Florida, part one
    By Eliot Kleinberg in the Gvl Sun Posted at 5:30 AM
    Another week of Florida Time means another week of dispelling misconceptions about Florida’s history. Let’s dive into the biggest hurricanes that hit our home state including The Great Miami Storm.
    Readers: June 1 marks the start of a season we’d just as soon bypassed Florida.

    Florida’s modern history – since the arrival of Europeans – dates back 500 years, but most of it has occurred in this century. And along with each major development, a hurricane usually has trailed close behind

    Any map makes it clear why Florida is such a frequent target. Its 1,350-mile coastline accounts for more than one-third of the hurricane strike zone, from Texas’ Mexico border to the tip of Maine. The state sticks out into the sea like a sore thumb.
    Of the 289 hurricanes to strike the United States from 1851 to 2015, 108 — more than one third — included a Florida landfall. Break down the total of 289 to just the 97 major hurricanes — with top sustained winds of at least 111 mph — and 42 of those hit Florida. Of the 42, 18 had a landfall east of Lake Okeechobee and south of Cape Canaveral, the state’s most densely populated area.
    Florida History: The biggest hurricanes to hit Florida, part one
     
  7. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Florida History: The storm that washed away hundreds of workers and builders
    By Eliot Kleinberg
    What was North America’s most powerful hurricane ever? Hint: It was in Florida.

    Did you say Andrew? You’d be wrong. Barometric pressure, not wind speed, is how weather scholars measure a storm’s pure strength. Andrew’s lowest reading was 922 millibars. Michael, in 2018, got down to 919. The Labor Day storm’s lowest reading was 892.

    The storm that struck the Florida Keys on Sept. 3, 1935 – thus its nickname, the Labor Day storm, years before forecasters gave storms official names – swept those low-lying, vulnerable, tiny pieces of coral jutting into the Gulf of Mexico. It killed some 600. It washed an ambitious railroad beneath the waves. It would be the last nail in the coffin of the real estate boom and usher in the Great Depression.
    The storm was the most powerful known to strike North America and, with Camille and Andrew, one of only three Category 5 storms on record to strike the U.S. in the 20th century or before.

    In a 10-mile stretch from Tavernier to Key Vaca, nothing was left standing. In all, it killed at least 577 people. But some bodies were never found. At least 288 of the dead were those Civilian Conservation Corps highway workers.

    Florida History: The storm that washed away hundreds of workers and builders
     
  8. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Florida History: Why did the most powerful hurricane known to Florida kill so few?
    By Eliot Kleinberg Gvl Sun
    Today is the last of a four-parter on Florida’s great hurricanes. In the previous weeks, we’ve heard about The Great Miami Storm, The Great Okeechobee Hurricane and The Labor Day Storm. Today, we hear about the strongest storm to strike our home state, Hurricane Andrew. Welcome to Florida Time, a weekly column about Florida history.

    Early on Aug. 24, 1992, a monster hurricane named Andrew swept across southern Florida. The Earth also experienced Katrina in New Orleans and Maria in Puerto Rico which were lesser storms whose carnage was exponentially multiplied by man-made failures. Some of that occurred with Andrew as well. But most of what Hurricane Andrew did was the result of the storm’s almost inconceivable power.

    Never before had a storm that powerful struck a place so populated -- and not since. Its impact changed the way we prepare for -- and recover from -- hurricanes. Not just in Florida but nationwide.

    The ordeal of Andrew was intensified because two and a half days before it struck, it wasn’t on the radar. Forecasters said on the afternoon of Friday, Aug. 21, that the system was disorganized and wandering, and they should go about their normal business. Early on Saturday morning, everything had changed. The system had been reformed into a hurricane and was on a beeline for Miami.

    Florida History: Why did the most powerful hurricane known to Florida kill so few?
     
  9. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Florida History: Is Glades County really named after the Everglades?

    Today, Florida Time continues with part two of four installments of a highly-anticipated list. Here are Florida’s counties and the origins of their names.

    Ever been to Escambia County? Live there? Well, it makes this week’s list and you’d be pleased to know it was one of the very first counties created when Florida became a state, along with St. Johns.

    More about St. Johns in part four. For now, let’s jump into the second batch of Florida’s counties with facts from this writer’s book, Florida Fun Facts, as well as the Florida Department of State and the Florida Handbook. Note: Years refer to each county’s formation.

    De Soto (1887): For Hernando de Soto, Spanish explorer; the only person in the names of two Florida counties.

    Duval (1822): William P. DuVal was the second governor of the U.S. territory of Florida, succeeding future president Andrew Jackson. He served from 1822 to 1834, by far the longest of the six terms preceding statehood.

    Escambia (1821): It’s believed to be a corruption of the Spanish “cambiar,” or “exchange,” though it might be named for a Panhandle native village called San Cosmo y San Damian de Escambé′ or Scambé’. Escambia and St. Johns were the first two counties when Florida joined the United States in 1821.

    Flagler (1917): For icon Henry M. Flagler, who built up nearby St. Augustine before literally putting Palm Beach on the map.
    Florida History: Is Glades County really named after the Everglades?

    ++
    Related: Florida Time: Who were the two Henry’s?
    Missed part 1? What is Alachua County named after? And other county origins
    Florida Time archives:
    Get caught up on the stories you’ve missed
    Last week: Florida Time: The people behind the space program never thought historians would be back
     
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  10. defensewinschampionships

    defensewinschampionships GC Hall of Fame

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    One quote there astounds me. Florida makes up 1/3 of the coastline from Maine to Mexico
     
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  11. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    that is what being a peninsula can do for you :) that and increase your vulnerablilty to hurricanes :)
     
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  12. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Florida History: From Mosquito County to Orange County and other name origins
    By Eliot Kleinberg From the Gvl Sun
    Today, Florida Time continues with part three of four installments of a highly-anticipated list. Here are Florida’s counties and the origins of their names.

    In part one of our ‘how Florida counties got their name’ list, we learned about every county in Florida, starting with the A’s and going through the H’s. Did you know know Alachua County is a Muskogee or Timucua -- both Native American tribes -- word for sinkhole? Or that Highlands County was named for the hilly parts of south-central Florida? We did.

    So far, we have J through W remaining, plus a bonus history fact about a county in the Panhandle you won’t want to miss. As a reminder, all facts are from this writer’s book, Florida Fun Facts, as well as the Florida Department of State and the Florida Handbook. Note: Years refer to each county’s formation.

    Jackson (1822): Andrew Jackson, president from 1829 to 1837, was named the first governor of the U.S. territory of Florida in 1821. He accepted only if he could resign once a government was organized. He served just eight months. One of five counties named for U.S. presidents (Jefferson, Madison, Polk, Washington).

    Jefferson (1827): Thomas Jefferson, president from 1801 to 1809, died on July 4 of the preceding year.


    Florida History: From Mosquito County to Orange County and other name origins
     
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  13. swampbabe

    swampbabe GC Hall of Fame

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    You should read the book Category 5, the 1935 Labor Day Hurricane by Thomas Knowles. Fascinating stuff
     
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  14. defensewinschampionships

    defensewinschampionships GC Hall of Fame

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    I thought Alachua came from Spanish for cows?
     
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  15. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    My brother who "recruited" me to come to Gville, told me that Palatka was Native American for "redneck". :D I fell for it, lol.
     
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  16. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    commentary Whitley in the Sentinel
    Whatever happened to Six Gun Territory?
    There was a disturbing scene outside Ocala. About a dozen heavily-armed men got into a shootout in a downtown area.

    Early reports were sketchy, but witnesses said the street was littered with victims. At least one gunman apparently fell off a roof while exchanging gunfire.

    All of which brings us to this week’s Ask Orlando question: “I remember seeing TV ads all the time growing up about Six Gun Territory. Whatever happened to that place?”

    Short answer: Walt Disney shot it out of the saddle.

    And it’s not the only victim of that dastardly Disney. Not that anyone around Orlando should be too upset, since we would be Opa-Locka if Disney had not decided to build his kingdom in our midst.

    But Walt Disney World brought collateral damage, aka Marco Polo Park, Cypress Gardens, Boardwalk and Baseball, Circus World, Aquatarium, Splendid China, Marineland and a few other theme parks.

    Some were here before Disney arrived, others came after. The Mighty Mouse wasn’t the sole reason they went out of business. But it didn’t help that every tourist arriving in Florida preferred riding Space Mountain over petting a cocker spaniel at Dog Land.

    Yes, there really was a Dog Land.
    Whatever happened to Six Gun Territory?
     
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  17. LakeGator

    LakeGator Mostly Harmless Moderator

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    I always enjoyed Birds of Prey which was near Six Gun Territory - at least based on my recollection from several decades ago. It is sad to think about all the nature based tourism pretty much put out of business by the rat.

    Six Gun was more tourist 'trap' with little actual connection to real Florida or nature but certainly fun for little kids during the reign of the TV westerns of the day.
     
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  18. LakeGator

    LakeGator Mostly Harmless Moderator

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    In recalling the good old days around Ocala I was reminded of one of the nearby attractions. This one was free, unless you were a taxpayer, just south of Ocala and north of Belleview. How many here know why 441/301/27 split north and south lanes south of Ocala?

    Capture.JPG

    Up until the early 1980s you could get a hint before the trees covered the bridge piers built between the lanes. Why bridge piers in the center of the state with no waterway?

    The answer, of course, was the Cross Florida Barge Canal. This boondoggle costing at least $73 million is well documented in a nice but a bit dry book, Ditch of Dreams: The Cross Florida Barge Canal and the Struggle for Florida's Future (Florida History and Culture)
     
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  19. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Marge Carr won that battle she and a lot of other enviro activist, she was special tho I was fortunate to work with her and others on NCFl environmental stuff back in my political days..
     
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  20. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    How different would Central Florida be if the barge canal project was completed? My guess is VERY different.
     
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