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Florida History:Ku Klux Klan exposed

Discussion in 'GatorTail Pub' started by gatorjjh, May 16, 2019.

  1. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Florida History: Florida’s alligators were here first -- a brief history
    Bt Eliot Kleinberg pbpost.com
    This week, in “Florida Time,” a weekly column on Florida’s history, we discuss the ever-popular alligator. From how long the reptile has been around to where it got its nickname.

    Readers Colleen and Steve Moonen of Sarasota wrote in, asking “Have there always been alligators in Florida? When did the university take them as their mascot? What role have alligators played in FL environment, development and politics?”

    This writer is reminded of a call from a person who had moved to South Florida, to a home that abutted a pond. She was shocked! An alligator was in the pond ... she wanted it out. We sadly informed her, “Lady, the alligator was here first.”
    How so? According to a 2016 article by, naturally, the University of Florida, most of the state has changed in 8 million years, but alligators are, in terms of evolution, the same animal.

    According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, crocodilians (both alligators and crocodiles, the latter found in Florida only at the state’s south end) evolved from the same common ancestor as dinosaurs. So even though they’re classified as reptiles, they’re technically more closely related to birds.
    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission estimates Florida has 1.3 million alligators

    Florida History: Florida's alligators were here first -- a brief history
     
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  2. Claygator

    Claygator GC Hall of Fame

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    "Cow" is "vaca" in Spanish.
     
  3. defensewinschampionships

    defensewinschampionships GC Hall of Fame

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    Whelp, just ignore me then
     
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  4. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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  5. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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  6. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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  7. defensewinschampionships

    defensewinschampionships GC Hall of Fame

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    This is about 2 miles from my house
     
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  8. beachpiratefla

    beachpiratefla Resident Pirate VIP Member

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    No shortage of Gators and deer where I live...
     
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  9. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Florida History: How did each Florida county get its name?
    What better way to lay the foundation of Florida history than with the origin of each county’s name? Today, you’ll get Part 4, the last of our counties lists. Welcome to Florida Time.

    Readers: Today we wrap up our list of Florida’s 67 counties and how they got their names. First of all, let’s get in Indian River, which accidentally was left out of our previous columns!
    Get a glimpse of Florida’s history, and get resources to learn more, every week with Florida historian Eliot Kleinberg.
    Florida Time author Eliot Kleinberg
    Follow EK on Twitter:@eliotkpbp
    Miss a column? Check out the Florida Time archive.
    Have a question? Email Eliot and the Florida Time team at floridatime@gatehousemedia.com.
    Don’t miss a story: Sign up for the Florida Time newsletter delivered every Friday to your email. Text FLORIDATIME to 345345 .
    As a reminder, all facts are from this writer’s book, Florida Fun Facts, as well as the Florida Department of State and the Florida Handbook. Note: Years refer to each county’s formation.

    Indian River (1925): The river for which the county is named originally was Rio de Ais, for a local indigenous group, then just named “Indian.”

    Pasco (1887): Samuel Pasco was speaker of the Florida House when the county formed.

    Pinellas (1911): The Spanish named the peninsula Punta Pinal: “point of pines.”

    Polk (1861): James K. Polk was president from 1845 to 1849.

    Florida Time archives: Get caught up on the stories you’ve missed

    [​IMG]


    Putnam (1849): Either for Israel Putnam, Revolutionary hero, or Benjamin A. Putnam, an officer in the Seminole wars and an unsuccessful congressional candidate who was the first president of the Florida Historical Society.

    St. Johns (1821): About 1590, missionaries founded Mission San Juan del Puerto, “Saint John of the Harbor,” for John the Baptist. Under British occupation, 1763 to 1783, it was anglicized to “St. John.”

    St. Lucie (1844): Spanish explorer Pedro Menéndez de Avilés established the Santa Lucia settlement, at either St. Lucie Inlet or Jupiter Inlet, on Dec. 13, 1565, the feast day of Santa Lucia. According to legend, she was born in the fourth century in Sicily of noble parents and was exposed as a Christian by a spurned suitor and later executed.

    Santa Rosa (1842): For Rosa de Viterbo, Roman Catholic Saint. As a 12-year-old, she preached against submission to Emperor Frederick II.

    Sarasota (1921): From the Calusa, perhaps for “Point of Rocks”.


    Florida History: How did each Florida county get its name?
     
  10. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    As a long time resident of Lake County in a previous life, I'm guessing it was named after the awesome lakes there. Clermont Chain, Harris Chain, the lake I lived on, and Swiss Ski School as well as Jack Traver's place north of Mascotte.
     
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  11. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    growing up in Clermont almost all of the kids in school lived a mile or less from a lake or canal, most like me could throw a rock and get a splash, loved those canepole fishin' days :)
     
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  12. LakeGator

    LakeGator Mostly Harmless Moderator

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    The address on my birth certificate is "On Lake Griffin at the end of Canal Street."
     
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  13. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    been there :)
     
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  14. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    Was that Canal Street by the baseball field or by the nature park? Been there too. Lake County represent. :)
     
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  15. LakeGator

    LakeGator Mostly Harmless Moderator

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    You have the right road as what would be the southernmost part of Canal Street. It runs between Venetian Gardens and Pat Thomas Field and continues north, running between Lake Harris and Lake Griffin. The name comes from the canal that was to connect the two lakes. In the 19th century the most efficient and safest way to get to central Florida was via steamboats which came down the Ocklawaha River into Lake Griffin. The idea of the canal was to allow people to travel further south toward Mosquito (now Orange) County. The only part of the canal completed was at the northern end which is adjacent to Herlong Park, now.
     
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  16. gatorknights

    gatorknights GC Hall of Fame

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    Years ago (ok decades ago) I was able to put the boat in at Trimble Park on Lake Beauclaire and was able to go up the Harris/Dora chain, into the Ocklawaha up to Silver Springs and back. It was a great trip. :)
     
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  17. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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  18. defensewinschampionships

    defensewinschampionships GC Hall of Fame

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  19. gatorjjh

    gatorjjh A Gator with a Glass half full attitude Moderator VIP Member

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    Florida History: Is UF really Florida’s oldest university?
    By Eliot Kleinberg
    Today, we learn about Florida’s state universities. Welcome to Florida Time, a weekly column about Florida history.

    Readers: Lately we’ve been talking about alligators. It’s football season, and your correspondent has been up-front about my fierce loyalty to my alma mater, the University of Florida, and its Gators.

    But, being a professional journalist first, there’s the objectivity thing. So let’s explore UF’s claim that it’s Florida’s oldest university, and Florida State’s counterclaim. Here’s more from the two schools and the state’s university system:

    UF claims a birth date of 1853. It argues it is directly linked to the East Florida Seminary, founded that year in Ocala and moved to Gainesville in 1866.

    In 1851, state lawmakers passed a bill authorizing the establishment of two seminaries. West Florida Seminary, in Tallahassee, started accepting students in 1857. That institution later would gain fame in the Civil War, when, as the Florida Military and Collegiate Institute, it sent teenaged cadets, along with grizzled veterans of the Seminole Wars, to successfully repel Union troops at the Battle of Natural Bridge.
    Florida History: Is UF really Florida's oldest university?

    Read more Florida history: Here are Florida’s top 25 stories of all time
    Florida Time archives: Get caught up on the stories you’ve missed
     
  20. shelbygt350

    shelbygt350 GC Hall of Fame

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    For many years people in the Tampa area "assumed" that Hookers Point was named after a Confederate general, but it was really where the women met the ships...as in the hookers. Love that one.

    In the future we will be forced to rename all these counties that were named after white men.

    Hopefully, my sarcastic comment does not come true.
     
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