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Covid-19: Treatments, Cures, and Vaccines

Discussion in 'GatorNana's Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by exiledgator, Apr 10, 2020.

  1. dingyibvs

    dingyibvs Premium Member

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    Well, I wouldn't go that far. We have a highly effective cure for most common strains of Hep C now, for example.
     
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  2. PD

    PD GC Columnist VIP Member

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    Ah yeah, good call. But that’s extremely unique, and I’m not comfortable yet that the newer treatments truly eradicate the virus.

    Don’t get me wrong, it’s a very hopeful discovery and if it does truly eradicate the virus, it could start a pathway to eradicating more viruses. But I don’t see this yet as anything but a novel fluke.
     
  3. gatorpa

    gatorpa GC Hall of Fame

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    Eli Lilly says monoclonal antibody cocktail cuts hospitalizations by 70% for high-risk COVID-19 patients (msn.com)

    Eli Lilly says monoclonal antibody cocktail cuts hospitalizations by 70% for high-risk COVID-19 patients

    Good News, Regeneron has a cocktails which seems to be just as good or better they have done a trail as a prevention for people with recent close exposure.

    In a large, late-stage study the company unveiled Tuesday, bamlanivimab combined with another monoclonal antibody, etesevimab, was found to be extremely effective in high-risk patients diagnosed with COVID-19.

    Among patients who received a placebo, 10% of those at high risk ended up in the hospital, compared to just 2% of those who received the drug cocktail – a 70% drop. Patients were diagnosed an average of four days before treatment.
     
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  4. gatorpa

    gatorpa GC Hall of Fame

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    Correlation is not Causation comes to mind..
     
  5. gator95

    gator95 GC Hall of Fame

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    Well, when they haven't been put thru the years of reviews that almost all drugs go thru who knows at this point. We are all basically one big trial. I know I wouldn't let my kids get this vaccine at this point. My mom got it but she's 80. Anyone over 65 should get it at this point. Under 65 should weigh their individual risks.
     
  6. gatorpa

    gatorpa GC Hall of Fame

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    True but most Flu shots don't go through years of trials.
    Part of the reason this went so fast was the next phase of the studies were already set up which causes a huge delay. Both from the fact the phase 2 and phase protocols were already written and sites to run them were already identified so once the phase 1 data was in the next phase could get rolling almost right away.

    I wouldn't have my kids get it either, based more on the fact that kids have a very very very low chance of a bad outcome. But they don't get the flu shot either (we have good treatment if they really get the flu)
     
  7. gator95

    gator95 GC Hall of Fame

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    But for the most part the Flu vaccine has been tested so many times that we know the side effects. The bigger issue is we have the idiot teachers unions demanding kids get the vaccine before they return to work. That just won't happen in my view until full FDA approval of the covid vaccine happens. It's a disaster for kids in those cities.
     
  8. gatorpa

    gatorpa GC Hall of Fame

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    Well since there are no approved covid vaccines for kids under 16 they are SOL.
    I'd suggest the teachers that are concerned get vaccinated or teach from home before they force kids to get any vaccine. I just saw a study that showed in person schooling has a very low rate of transmission.
     
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  9. dingyibvs

    dingyibvs Premium Member

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    Purely anecdotal, but one of my colleagues developed a facial nerve paralysis (Bell's Palsy) shortly after getting the first Pfizer shot, which progressed to ataxia (impaired coordination) and was diagnosed ultimately with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. He told us a couple weeks ago that he's been recovering after receiving high dose steroids, not sure how he's doing now.

    For context, neurological side effects after vaccines is a relatively well known phenomenon, usually occurring at a rate of one in several hundreds of thousands to one in several millions. This obviously may not occur during a trial involving ~40k people, but may become more evident with more widespread use. We probably won't know for sure whether the Pfizer vaccine is of higher risk for developing such complications than say the flu vaccine for quite a while, though my guess is it'll be similar.

    tl:dr version: stuff like this can probably happen with the Pfizer vaccine, though it's likely not clinically significant but we won't know for sure for a while longer.
     
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  10. ncargat1

    ncargat1 VIP Member

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    Why did you leave this out??

    Also, this is nothing new as 4 out of 43,000 developed Bells Palsy like conditions 22-32 days after the shot. All of the cases resolved quickly.

    While they were not ignored, it turns out that these cases occurred at a rate consistent with the national rate of Bell's Palsy events.

    At least tell the whole story when you are contributing to the conversation please.
     
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  11. gator95

    gator95 GC Hall of Fame

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    What part of “likely” didn’t you understand? Yeah, the old “not certain that the vaccine caused the reaction” routine. I have facial nerve paralysis pop up all the time...
     
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  12. ncargat1

    ncargat1 VIP Member

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    Actually, if you would actually read something other than anti-vaccine cr@p, you would see that this came up in the trials and occurred at a rate consistent with the national average of occurrences. I added it to my reply.
     
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  13. gator95

    gator95 GC Hall of Fame

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    Right, and did the miscarriages pop up at the same rate that they are occurring? Or the elderly dying at alarming rates in Norway from the vaccine. Maybe if the drug companies actually put the elderly in their trials we would’ve had data on that. It’s ok to be skeptical of a vaccine that we don’t know a lot about. You feel free to defend everything about it.
     
  14. dingyibvs

    dingyibvs Premium Member

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    Just a small update. My colleague is doing pretty well, though still resting at home. He was on our Zoom department meeting yesterday. Also, just to clarify, the incidence rate I mentioned is # of cases in excess of normal incidence (and thus presumably attributable to the vaccine), not the overall incidence.
     
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  15. swampbabe

    swampbabe GC Hall of Fame

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    I’d love to get the vaccine but I’m not quite old enough and teaching from home is not an option, so...
     
  16. VAg8r1

    VAg8r1 GC Hall of Fame

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  17. WC53

    WC53 GC Hall of Fame

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    Mask don’t work brought to you by it’s just the flu inc.
     
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  18. gatorpa

    gatorpa GC Hall of Fame

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    Why can't you teach from home?
    Depending on your age the risk of a bad outcome is very low (based on the data)...
     
  19. swampbabe

    swampbabe GC Hall of Fame

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    I would have to resign my position here in Brevard County. Only folks that can teach from home are some elementary teachers. I'm 62, so not that far removed from the magic number.

    BTW, we have 177 kids in quarantine today and that's just at my school.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2021
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  20. gatorpa

    gatorpa GC Hall of Fame

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    I'm not sure where you're getting some of your info from but its not accurate.

    Women who were pregnant are excluded from clinical trials for vaccines(and almost all others).
    I don't think any company has said they are safe or unsafe in pregnant women as they didn't test any....
    Elderly were in the trials, while most of the phase trials started with the first 1000 or so under age 65 after that they open it up to older adults.
    We currently are running the Janssen trial, initially it was only healthy subject under 65(first 1000 subject) now it has no upper age limit and few medical history exclusions..