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Christian views may have kept star off US women’s soccer

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by kf4syr, Jul 11, 2019.

  1. GatorFanCF

    GatorFanCF GC Hall of Fame

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    Sure - like how one man can convince a nation of intelligent people to gas their fellow citizens?
    Absurd.

    Reality is typically crazier than fiction.
     
  2. GatorFanCF

    GatorFanCF GC Hall of Fame

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    From the article “... national team, reportedly because she didn’t want to wear special team jerseys recognizing Gay Pride Month.”

    How about uniforms honoring White Pride? Yes, it’s political.
     
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  3. wgbgator

    wgbgator Extremely Online Premium Member

    The US government officially recognizes pride month, why is it political?
     
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  4. rivergator

    rivergator Too Hot Mod Moderator VIP Member

    Apr 8, 2007
    No, I thought you were talking about the jerseys they wore in the World Cup. The Pride jerseys were two years ago.
     
  5. What is this US women's soccer team of which you speak?

    I have ignored them while they played and more so afterward. Their views don't represent mine so I don't care about them. I put a couple of posters in here on ignore the last couple of days, which is my right.

    I have no gratification from their win at all because of their behavior, demeanor and stances. They don't represent THIS American. Not in the least.
     
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  6. GatorFanCF

    GatorFanCF GC Hall of Fame

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    Is this a serious question?
     
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  7. ursidman

    ursidman GC Hall of Fame

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    Hi back at ‘em
     
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  8. oragator1

    oragator1 Premium Member

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    It really is remarkable to me how hard people seem to work these days to find things to get upset about.
    As I said pages ago, she wasn’t good enough to make the team. There wasn’t a single commentator or former team member who asked why she didn’t make it, and even she hasn’t said a word. But get a political commentator (with zero soccer knowledge) to bring it up and all of a sudden it’s something that requires indignation among some.
    Rapinoe is a bit more complicated, but wishing the US lose because you don’t like the political stance of one player is bizarre to me. And yes, many were rooting for us to lose over her, the comments in the national stories for the games made that obvious.
    Rooting against a national team is about as un-American as it gets these days, but I guess many taking that stance don’t see the irony,
     
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  9. cocodrilo

    cocodrilo GC Hall of Fame

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    I don't care about the team's politics. All I know is that Rapinoe is an unmitigated jerk to get up on stage at the celebration and use the F word on national TV because, well, because she says she uses the F word a lot. Well I know what she can do with it.
     
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  10. orangeblue_coop

    orangeblue_coop GC Hall of Fame

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    Imagine not supporting the women's soccer team because their behavior, demeanor and stances don't align with yours...but openly supporting Donald Trump:emoji_laughing:
     
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  11. cocodrilo

    cocodrilo GC Hall of Fame

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    I can't even imagine openly supporting Donald Trump. I can understand a certain white fringe supporting him, but other than that it's incomprehensible. I mean even evangelical Christians support him.
     
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  12. dangolegators

    dangolegators GC Hall of Fame

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    Evangelical Christians especially support him. Tells you all you need to know about evangelical Christians.
     
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  13. lacuna

    lacuna The Conscience of Too Hot Moderator VIP Member

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    The Story of Sodom and Gomorrah does not say the cities and their inhabitants were destroyed because they were homosexual. That word doesn't even exist in ancient Hebrew. The cities were destroyed for another reason. "The stories of Sodom and Gibeah are examples of mob violence committed against outsiders. That’s the sin of Sodom—not homosexual behavior."

    The content on the website linked below is worth reading for a complete understanding of the reasons Sodom and Gomorrah were destroyed.

    Sodom and Gomorrah: How the "classical" interpretation gets it wrong - Westar Institute

    Sodom and Gomorrah
    How the "classical" interpretation gets it wrong

    "The story of Sodom and Gomorrah is one of the favorite passages of persons who oppose same-sex behavior. It occurs in Genesis 19:1-29. However, two earlier passages are prelude to this. In Genesis 13:12-13, the text says that the people of Sodom were “wicked, great sinners against the Lord.” Also, in 18:16-21 God informs Abraham: “How great is the outcry against Sodom and Gomorrah and how very grave their sin!” (v. 20). However, neither text explains what makes these cities sinful. So readers must infer the nature of their sinfulness from the story told in Genesis 19.

    "While several other biblical texts refer to Sodom (and sometimes Gomorrah), the only one that comments on Sodom’s sinfulness is the sixth century BCE prophet Ezekiel: “This was the guilt of your sister Sodom: she and her daughters had pride, excess of food, and prosperous ease, but did not aid the poor and needy. They were haughty, and did abominable things before me; therefore I removed them when I saw it” (16:49-50). The Hebrew word translated “abominable things” is to’evah. Sometimes this term is used with reference to sexual offenses (as in Leviticus 18:22), but this term has a broad range of meanings. According to the Encyclopedia Judaica, “Common to all these usages is the notion of irregularity, that which offends the accepted order, ritual, or moral.” Ezekiel 16 says nothing about same sex behavior. Context determines what Ezekiel meant by “abomination”: Sodom’s “abomination” was that she did not aid the poor and needy.

    "Judges 19 provides a chillingly similar story to the Sodom story in Genesis. An unnamed man from the tribe of Levi is traveling with his servant and his concubine. They arrive in the town of Gibeah and plan to spend the night in the town square. A little later, a man living in Gibeah, but described as from the country of Ephraim, comes upon them. He warns them that they are not safe in the open and takes the three to his home. Soon “the men of the city, a perverse lot” surround the house and demand that the owner send out the Levite “so that we may know him.” Like Lot, the owner tries to dissuade the mob. He offers to send out his virgin daughter and the Levite’s concubine. When the mob refuses to accept this offer, the Levite throws his poor concubine out the door anyway. The men of Gibeah rape her and abuse her all night long. It is a horrific story. The women dies as a result.

    "The Sodom story and the Gibeah story mutually interpret one another. First, the angels and the Levite are strangers, aliens. Lot and the Ephraimite man who lives in Gibeah are “resident aliens”. They are not native to Sodom or Gibeah. Such people were vulnerable to citizens suspicious of outsiders. Second, the men of Sodom and Gibeah use sexual violence—rape—to maltreat the outsiders. The Gibeah episode makes clear that the interest of the mob is not sexual gratification or homosexual behavior; their objective is to inflict violence on the aliens in their midst."

    ____________________________________________________________________

    In Matthew 10 Jesus sends his disciples out among the people to minister to them. He instructs them to go only to the 'lost sheep', taking no money or extra clothing. His words instructing them to find hospitable, welcoming accommodations underscore the comparison with the wicked, inhospitable cities destroyed on the plains of Shinar.

    9 “Do not get any gold or silver or copper to take with you in your belts—10 no bag for the journey or extra shirt or sandals or a staff, for the worker is worth his keep. 11 Whatever town or village you enter, search there for some worthy person and stay at their house until you leave.12 As you enter the home, give it your greeting. 13 If the home is deserving, let your peace rest on it; if it is not, let your peace return to you. 14 If anyone will not welcome you or listen to your words, leave that home or town and shake the dust off your feet. 15 Truly I tell you, it will be more bearable for Sodom and Gomorrah on the day of judgment than for that town."

    _____________________________________________________________-

    This instruction from Jesus is rooted from the time Abraham hosted the angels on their way to destroy Sodom. He bargains with them until they agree they won't destroy the cities if 10 righteous people were to be found within.

    There are many biblical passages instructing the obedient how to deal with the stranger among them.

    In his just published book, Justice for All: How the Jewish Bible Revolutionized Ethics, biblical scholar Jeremiah Unterman writes that “…it is startling that the legal portions of the Torah contain more than fifty references to the resident stranger….”

    Unterman examines the multitude of general admonitions not to harm the stranger, along with the positive exhortations to provide the stranger with basic food and clothing, with prompt payment of wages, and with legal justice. He points out that quite a few of these verses about the treatment of the stranger are juxtaposed with statements about God. The Torah understands the care of the stranger as imitatio dei, the imitation of God through the observance of the commandments. Unterman sees this as part of the ethical revolution of the Bible and notes that “nowhere in the ancient world is such a divine concern for the alien evinced.” He concludes with a most timely reminder that these laws should serve “to eliminate any shred of xenophobia.”

    __________________________________________________________

    A few:
    “You shall not wrong a stranger or oppress him, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt”(Ex.22:20).

    “You shall not oppress a stranger, for you know the soul of the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt” (Ex.23:9).

    “The stranger who resides with you shall be to you as one of your citizens; you shall love him as yourself, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt” (Lev.19:34).

    “You too must befriend the stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt” (Deut.10:19).

    “You shall not hate an Egyptian, for you were stranger in his land” (Deut.23:8).

    “Always remember that you were a slave in the land of Egypt; therefore do I enjoin you to observe this commandment” (Deut. 24:22).


    “Always remember that you were a slave in the land of Egypt; therefore do I enjoin you to observe this commandment” (Deut. 24:22).
     
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  14. wgbgator

    wgbgator Extremely Online Premium Member

    Totally. The government officially recognizes it, Donald Trump even made a statement acknowledging it. So what's political about it? Its only 'political' in the sense that celebrating black history month is 'political,' or acknowledging Ramadan or Christmas is 'political.'
     
  15. BigCypressGator1981

    BigCypressGator1981 Premium Member

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    It probably seems political to bigots.
     
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  16. tilly

    tilly Superhero Mod. Fast witted. Bulletproof posts. Moderator VIP Member

    Look! A strawman!
     
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  17. tilly

    tilly Superhero Mod. Fast witted. Bulletproof posts. Moderator VIP Member

    Agree with one exception. She was "good enough". She actually declined the invite to join the team.
     
  18. wgbgator

    wgbgator Extremely Online Premium Member

    For a non-competitive game. Generally, that's when they take a look at less established players. But sure, she's good enough to be in USWNT player pool. But that only puts her in the top 50 players in the country.
     
  19. oragator1

    oragator1 Premium Member

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    As mentioned above, when they play non tournament matches they call up a bunch of people to give them a look. They use those games to determine who to put on the final roster of 23 for the world cup or other major tournaments. Many of the spots are relatively secure, but a few come down to showing out in those games.
    It was one of those non tournament matches she turned down, which may have also not helped her later. You aren’t going to make a team as an(at best) borderline player if you don’t take the opportunity to impress the coaches and see how you fit in the locker room. And turning down a national team invite (even for principled reasons) doesn’t usually sit well when people are literally begging for them. But it all of that was her choice.
     
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  20. GrandPrixGator

    GrandPrixGator Premium Member

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    And also the reason S&G was destroyed was about the extreme in-hospitality not homosexuality.