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California politicians pushing for convicted felons to serve on juries

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by gator_fever, Jun 14, 2019.

  1. gator_fever

    gator_fever GC Hall of Fame

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    California moves to let felons serve on juries – Orange County Register

    Despite all of these efforts, the number of inmates hasn’t dropped dramatically enough to satisfy the state’s ruling Democrats, so they’re kicking tires on a new approach — rigging the jury system so no one gets convicted in the first place.

    This most recent push is Senate Bill 310, authored by state Sen. Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, and would allow Californians who have prior felony convictions to serve on juries.

    In a press release promoting the proposal, Skinner wrote, “SB310 will help ensure that California juries represent a fair cross-section of our communities…People with felony records have the right to vote in California. There is no legitimate reason why they should be barred from serving on a jury.”

    Currently, felons are prevented from serving on juries because of their obvious and inherent bias against prosecutors and law enforcement.
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    Just when you think the leftists can't dream up any crazier ideas. They may allow hardened felons to judge felony cases at trial.
     
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  2. BigCroc

    BigCroc Premium Member

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    Not all convicted felons have an "obvious and inherent bias against prosecutors and law enforcement". When I was a prosecutor I left a convicted felon (with civil rights restored) on juries several times - once in a case involving the sexual battery/murder of a young child - resulting in guilty verdicts.

    A 60 year old man with a prior conviction for burglary as an 18 year old or a conviction for drug smuggling during the 70's may well be a fully law abiding citizen and may make a good juror.

    Prosecutors will continue to have the ability to exercise their judgment regarding whether any particular prospective juror with a prior felony conviction will be fair to the State and will be able to excuse those they feel will not.

    This is not a big deal and will not result in the inability of the State to obtain convictions going forward. Just fear mongering from some conservatives because it is being proposed by democrats.
     
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  3. gator_fever

    gator_fever GC Hall of Fame

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    In most states there are limits on how many people the prosecutors can strike from a jury. If California says hardened felons are eligible to serve it could lead to some crazy mess if even one makes it onto the jury.
     
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  4. VAg8r1

    VAg8r1 GC Hall of Fame

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    While there are limits on the number of peremptory challenges of perspective jurors; there are no limits on challenges for cause. Obvious bias would probably fall into the latter category. In practical terms the probability of multiple convicted felons ending up in the jury pool would be relatively small meaning that any obviously or apparently biased former convicted felons would be struck using one or other form of challenge.
     
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  5. orangeblue_coop

    orangeblue_coop GC Hall of Fame

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    At this point I’d trust a convicted felon more than some of the corrupt pieces of garbage in the government.
     
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  6. gator_fever

    gator_fever GC Hall of Fame

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    I see your point but If I was a defense lawyer I would just try to get one of these crooks on the jury and play the crooked lying cops card if the crime wasn't caught on video.
     
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  7. GatorRade

    GatorRade Rad Scientist Premium Member

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    What about cops, should they be barred from jury service for inherent bias?
     
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  8. NavyGator93

    NavyGator93 GC Legend

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    I am less concerned about a felon on jury duty than I am about allowing them to carry.
     
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  9. 96Gatorcise

    96Gatorcise GC Hall of Fame

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    If a felon has served his time and has his rights restored it should be up to the lawyers if they make a jury
     
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  10. gator_fever

    gator_fever GC Hall of Fame

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    No - but if I was a defense lawyer I would try to keep most of them off a criminal trial jury.
     
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  11. grumpygator77

    grumpygator77 All American

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    Many times the crime of the "crooked lying cops" IS caught on video and Juries without any convicted felons see fit to let the criminals go.
     
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  12. carpeveritas

    carpeveritas GC Legend

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    Wonder what the reaction will be when a convicted felon sitting on the jury makes a run for it and breaks out court. I would imagine they needs some heightened security in place.
     
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  13. gator_fever

    gator_fever GC Hall of Fame

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    I agree that dashcams and smartphones etc. have exposed how a lot of cops take liberties and outright lie with their arrest affidavits. When I used to be around court some when I worked for the state when dashcams started hitting the scene I couldnt believe how many DUI's and other late night stops were getting tossed for the cops lying about having a founded suspicion for the stops. Some of their reports would have you believe the person was swerving a lot and other nonsense and then the tape was played to the Judge and the person was driving fine and the cop pulled them because it was 2 am in reality and lied about it. In the past those cases would just go by what the lying cop said.
     
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  14. grumpygator77

    grumpygator77 All American

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    I'm pretty sure they are talking about convicted felons that have already served their time and have become a part of society.
     
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  15. GatorRade

    GatorRade Rad Scientist Premium Member

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    Exactly. So why shouldn't the same hold true here? If both lawyers are ok with the person, I don't see why we should complain.
     
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  16. gator_lawyer

    gator_lawyer Premium Member

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    And . . . ? This is no big deal. The prosecutor can use his strikes if he wants.

    Checkmate.
     
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  17. carpeveritas

    carpeveritas GC Legend

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    Given it's CA it's difficult to tell what is on these peoples minds.
     
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  18. Gatorrick22

    Gatorrick22 GC Hall of Fame

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    Only the cops that are convicted criminals... Or do think that all cops are bad and not worthy of being a juror?
     
  19. Gatorrick22

    Gatorrick22 GC Hall of Fame

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    Lol... that as more like a checkers move. :rolleyes:
     
  20. demosthenes

    demosthenes Premium Member

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    Bias ≠ “Bad”
     
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