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Bill Maher calls out US media over Covid coverage

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by gator95, Apr 17, 2021.

  1. defensewinschampionships

    defensewinschampionships GC Hall of Fame

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    I love Maher. Even though I mostly disagree with him politically, I really enjoy his show.
     
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  2. gator95

    gator95 GC Hall of Fame

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    Maher proving his point post after post. Thanks
     
  3. gator95

    gator95 GC Hall of Fame

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    Lol. Maybe you should ask yourself why no one who is respected is trying to compare Australia and the US. Keep proving Maher right post after post. Have quite a few here confirming what Maher said about Dems. Guess that’s how we got so a disparity in how many Dems are misinformed on Covid.
     
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  4. gator95

    gator95 GC Hall of Fame

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    Facts are tough to argue. I get it, it sucks when I’m right.
     
  5. duchen

    duchen VIP Member

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    Again, no discussion of the methods used in Australia versus the US. Just your usual specious analysis and another attack.

    The lowest form of argument, really. Personal attacks like this.


    And, you are wrong again.

    What Can We Learn From Australia’s Covid-19 Response?

    Australia’s Covid-19 response has been the envy of many countries with Dr. Fauci recently praising the country for being a world leader on “containment and management of emerging variants”. Aside from a few brief snap lockdowns in certain states, most Australians have been enjoying a relatively normal life with the Broadway production of Hamilton recently opening in Sydney to full capacity theaters.

    Australia’s success proves that a strong public health response enforced by a democratic government focused on vigilant testing, tracing and quarantine is the key to fighting a pandemic. Below I’ve outlined some of the key lessons from Australia’s response that can be applied globally.


    Australia’s lockdown restrictions and behavioral safety protocols were also enacted swiftly. While restrictions varied between the states and rural and urban populations, they were clearly communicated through daily televised press conferences, public signage and advertising and further media outreach. Non-essential businesses were immediately closed, everyone was given a limited radius that they could not leave unless it was for essential work, medical appointments or caretaking, and households were not allowed to mix with some exceptions. Anyone found to be violating those restrictions faced a hefty fine. The easing of these restrictions and eventually restrictions on indoor and outdoor gatherings were tied to declining infection rates. This gave Australians a clear, logical path forward to reopening and encouraged compliance.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/worl...c198b2-1cb7-11eb-ad53-4c1fda49907d_story.html

    The Sydney Opera House has reopened. Almost 40,000 spectators attended the city's rugby league grand final. Workers are being urged to return to their offices.

    As North America, Europe, India, Brazil and other regions and countries struggle to bring tens of thousands of daily infections under control, Australia provides a real-time road map for democracies to manage the pandemic. Its experience, along with New Zealand's, also shows that success in containing the virus isn't limited to East Asian states (Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan) or those with authoritarian leaders (China, Vietnam).

    Several practical measures contributed to Australia's success, experts say. The country chose to quickly and tightly seal its borders, a step some others, notably in Europe, did not take. Health officials rapidly built up the manpower to track down and isolate outbreaks. And unlike the U.S. approach, all of Australia's states either shut their domestic borders or severely limited movement for interstate and, in some cases, intrastate travelers.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/03/15/10-reasons-australias-covid-19-success-story/

    Last week, Anthony S. Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, singled out Australia’s response to the covid-19 pandemic as an example of success. “They really do get the cases almost to nothing,” he said. “We’ve never had that in the United States.”


    Indeed, local transmission in Australia is limited to the occasional, isolated case. There are just 43 people in hospital. With 909 total deaths since the pandemic began, the rate of death per 100,000 in Australia stands at 3.6, compared with 163 in the United States and 188 in Britain.



    Australia offers a strange glimpse of post-pandemic life

    The exceptional response in Australia -- rapid lockdowns and strict quarantine rules -- has given us some great freedoms. Last weekend, I watched a movie on the big screen. Just over a year ago, going to the cinema seemed routine. Mundane, even. But I hadn't been to the cinema since Jan. 11, 2020. Doing so has, for many months, seemed careless or even selfish. So this was big.

    A year since the World Health Organization officially declared a pandemic, Australia provides a tiny glimpse of what the future might look like. The crisis isn't over, and we haven't even agreed on what "The End" really means scientifically or socially. But in Australia, the end feels as close as it ever has. In this pseudo-future place, we've found some semblance of normalcy, while much of the world still struggles to get outbreaks under control and grieves daily losses. It's an incredibly strange feeling.

    Being at a cinema hammers the point home.

    After Crushing Covid, Melbourne Emerges Wary and More Sedate

    Melbourne has gone 10 days without any reported Covid-19 cases, and the majority of its 5 million residents aren’t taking chances.


    They are emerging cautiously from a 16-week lockdown that health experts say has helped put the city, and possibly the entire country, on track to eliminate the coronavirus. The Melbourne Cup horse race -- known locally as the “race that stops the nation” -- was held Tuesday without spectators, while people go about their daily activities in mandatory masks.

    As cities in Europe and North America struggle to suppress a resurgence of the pandemic, Melbourne is an example of how the coronavirus can be brought under control even in the peak of winter by following stay-at-home and compulsory mask-wearing orders. New cases in the state of Victoria peaked in August, sparking deadly outbreaks in nursing homes that kept businesses shuttered and residents confined to their homes.

    “There are countries that have the technical expertise and the capacity to do exactly what Victoria has done, but they haven’t,” Slevin said. “In other parts of the world, that same political leadership hasn’t supported the expert advice. And the truth is, those communities have paid the price with their lives.”

    Australia, with a population of 25 million, recorded 907 Covid-19 deaths from 27,658 cases as of Sunday. It’s not taking that low tally for granted.
     
    • Off-topic Off-topic x 1
  6. duchen

    duchen VIP Member

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    You outright lied about what I said. You claimed I made a statement about DeSantis shutting down travel that i never said.

    And, rather than take it back or apologize, you post another of your snarky insults.

    Shame on you.

    Prove me wrong. Post where I said DeSantis should shut down air travel.

    Otherwise, you lied.

    BTW: you will not find the post where I said DeSantis should shut down air travel. I went to law school. I know he cannot.

    So, you might as well apologize, because you can't insult your way out of your dishonest statement.
     
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  7. gator95

    gator95 GC Hall of Fame

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    LOL, you can always tell someone has lost the argument when they lose their cool and start going off on tangents. I guess the “respected” part of what I said wasn’t understood. Keep up the effort. But you are wrong and proving what Maher said in every post you make. It’s quite comical.
     
  8. duchen

    duchen VIP Member

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    Don't project your inadequacies on me. Read post 120 again. And 137.

    Tell me where I said DeSantis should shut down air travel.

    As for the links you say aren't "respected," I posted Bloomberg, Forbes and the Washington Post, as well as the authorities quoted.

    You offered irrelevant population statistics and more of your snark.
     
  9. gator95

    gator95 GC Hall of Fame

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    I see, snark is the term for “facts I don’t like”. Got it. Might want to look at a map sometime soon. Maybe see how “close” Australia is to other countries. Look, I understand it’s a losing argument for you on lockdowns and schools, but if you just say “sorry, I was wrong” I will drop it. You can do it. I have faith in you seeing the light. Don’t keep proving Maher right.
     
  10. duchen

    duchen VIP Member

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    There haven’t been any “facts” in your posts upthread. Just your usual attempts to deflect from the subject with insults and grandiose claims of having proven your point even though you post nothing in response. And, now you condition an apology for your lying about what I said in another set of falsehoods.
     
  11. gator95

    gator95 GC Hall of Fame

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    Facts? Lets go over some facts.
    Fact: CA and FL have almost identical Death rates for Covid(1542 vs 1599).
    Fact: FL offers 100% of students full time in person class. CA offers 7.3% in person classes
    Fact: FL has a 4.7% unemployment rate Vs CA is 8.5%(48th in the country)
    Fact: FL is the 5th oldest state(42.4 avg age), CA is 7th youngest(37 avg age)
    Fact: People have vastly overstated the chances of being hospitalized from Covid because our MSM has pushed the narrative that Covid is deadly to everyone when the reality is Covid is deadly to only those who are elderly or have preexisting conditions.

    But hey, keep up the good fight. Some people still believe the garbage you and others post about lockdowns and schools being closed to in person learning. You keep proving Maher right with every post.
     
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  12. VAg8r1

    VAg8r1 GC Hall of Fame

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    Some more stats.
    Cases/million FL 101,181, CA 94,183
    although the test per million is higher for CA at 1,466,232 compared with FL at 1,250,545
    Deaths per million FL 1,605, CA 1,545
    United States COVID: 32,477,753 Cases and 581,591 Deaths - Worldometer

    While Covid-19 is more lethal for older individuals or individuals with preexisting conditions, younger people are not immune from serious cases and incidence of serious cases defined as requiring is hospitalization is increasing among younger individuals probably as the result of infections from the newer variants of Covid-19.
    Medical leaders say young people now make up a higher percentage of COVID-19 hospitalizations | 13newsnow.com
     
  13. gator95

    gator95 GC Hall of Fame

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    That last paragraph is a bit misleading. Here is the data from the CDC.

    Cases, Data, and Surveillance

    The odds of a young person being hospitalized compared to anyone over the age of 65 is at least 5 times lower. And of course Deaths are so rare it's not worth comparing.
     
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  14. slayerxing

    slayerxing GC Hall of Fame

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    When it happens I'll let you know.
     
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  15. duchen

    duchen VIP Member

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    Australia had lockdowns. And travel restrictions imposed nationally between its states and internationally. It Eliminated cases in cities with over 5 million people. California and Florida didn’t have lockdowns. They had half assed measures like the rest of this country. Some more half assed than others. So, your comparison, inaccurate as it is as pointed out above, are meaningless to the subject because they don’t prove anything about lockdowns. They are comparisons between half assed measures and less than half assed measures. And while Florida’s infection rates are rising in any event, California has now gotten its rates to 1%. Because social distancing works. Without a vow, This is the last time I will ever respond to one of your posts. Insofar as you lied about what I said and doubled down on it, you have forfeited your right to any meaningful exchange with me. I will endeavor to avoid the mistake of wasting my time
     
  16. gator95

    gator95 GC Hall of Fame

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    CA didn't have lockdowns? Might want to take that up with the LA Times.

    Inside Gavin Newsom's fateful decision to lock down California

    So funny. Keep making stuff up.
     
  17. gator95

    gator95 GC Hall of Fame

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    Ah, the ol' "i don't like his facts" routine. Got it. Good effort. Maher says Hi.
     
  18. slayerxing

    slayerxing GC Hall of Fame

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    If you think Maher agrees with much of the drivel you post here then I have to seriously question your comprehension skills.
     
  19. gator95

    gator95 GC Hall of Fame

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    Only on dems being so wrong on the risks of covid. But you keep proving his point left and right.
     
  20. slayerxing

    slayerxing GC Hall of Fame

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    I didn’t disagree with him but you and him are saying very different things like worlds different. Probably because you’re from another planet. That makes the most sense.