Who will take the last shot of a game?

Discussion in 'Nuttin' but Net' started by phideltdj, Nov 6, 2013.

  1. InstiGATOR1

    InstiGATOR1 Active Member

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    Donovan likes to be sure and get a shot up in these situations particularly if the game is tied. Thus it is usually the PG who takes such shots. These are situations where you just can not afford a turnover, particularly a live ball turnover, so Donovan plays them very close to the vest.

    UF never really had a close game at the end of regulation last year. In some close games at the half, Wilbekin dribbled down the clock, penetrated and scored. I expect something similar this season, though if we have enough such situations, I would also expect Wilbekin to pass some. I would expect, if Hill is in the game and has shown to be secure with the ball, he too would be a possibility for this.
  2. GatorRade

    GatorRade Well-Known Member

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    Agreed. Donovan's regular half court offense is clearly devised to move the ball until someone is open. However, during end of game situations, the offense totally changes into some kind of weird point guard isolation. This has happened so frequently that I have to believe this is by design at this point. It's totally bizarre.
  3. rserina

    rserina VIP Member

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    That's just not true at all. We run the same basic high ball screen sets and half court motions at the end of games that we run throughout it. Within ten seconds, though, someone is always designated to run a high ball screen. Same thing at end of shot clock as at the end of a game. If you want to compare an end of game situation to anything, compare to the end of the shot clock, but in either case it is the same exact offense, same set, same spacing, same everything.

    One criticism that could be made is Donovan doesn't call a timeout and draw up a play specifically for that instance. He has seldom ever done that, I suspect, because he thinks you are better off running what your kids know than throwing something at them they don't know very well. Furthermore, given that we have among the most complex (and as a result most efficient per possession) half court offenses in the nation, it is almost unrealistic to expect us to spend that much more time on end of game situations that come around 2-4 times a season.

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