Were Human's Designed To Eat Meat?

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by 108, Dec 30, 2013.

  1. channingcrowderhungry
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    channingcrowderhungry Well-Known Member

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    I realize your post was in complete snark. The cool thing about science though, is that it knows it doesn't have all the answers. It's a dynamic, ever changing, work in progress that has been going on since the dawn of scientific theory. Weird that offends you. That something and somone can admit to not having all the answers...
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  2. tim85
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    tim85 Well-Known Member

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    It really wasn't in complete snark, I realize it kinda came off that way.

    @oragator1 I had no intention in bringing religion to it at all, honestly, I don't think I even mentioned it.

    From what I knew of most modern evolutionary theories(which is admittedly really little), I thought the main basis for evolution was genetic mutations that would spark the next change in that species. If the theory is that human brains grew through cooking food, and not through mutations, would it not correlate with the ideas of evolution?

    As far as the constant changes go, I think new scientific discoveries are fantastic. I love that stuff, I actually excel in Science-related topics as a student. What I do take issue is that we're teaching kids theories that are constantly changing as cold-hard fact. Half of the stuff I learned in Science classes in high school is either "refined" or debunked. I understand that part of the nature of the scientific field is that things are going to change, I just don't like how quickly some like to use recently discovered theories or ideas and treat them as end-all be-all facts.
  3. ursidman
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    ursidman Well-Known Member

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    I think we evolved as omnivores. We have a simple gut - not a multi-chambered gut of many herbivores. I think until we invented effective tools and a way to communicate and hunt in groups, we probably did not eat meat frequently or at least could not depend on it to much exclusion. Cabeza de Vaca was a Spanish official that became shipwrecked off the west coast of Florida in 1539 and eventually made his way overland to his countrymen near Mexico City. As he was traveling, he encountered many aboriginal tribes that had never had European contact before. His account of some of his time with them as they went about acquiring nutrition reminds me of the foraging strategy of bears: travel to a berry patch when they were ripe, digging roots, travel down to the coast at low tide for shell fish, travel upland for acorns, etc. The tribe was opportunistic - trying to acquire the most calories at the cheapest physiological cost.
  4. exiledgator
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    exiledgator Gruntled Premium Member

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    Mutations don't have to be completely random. They can be somewhat "forced" through environmental influences.

    More fat and protein allowed some brains to grow. Bigger brained folk lived longer and screwed more.

    Did the Inuit move north because he was short and stout?
  5. oragator1
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    oragator1 Well-Known Member

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    Fair enough, and no you didn't mention religion, I brought it in, was going to to back and take it out but didn't :)
    As far as theories and fact, I think there is a fine line there, because technically everything that can't be empirically proven through testing is a theory, and little of what happened before we were here can be tested. It's a question of how much evidence is behind that theory I suppose and how much credence a person chooses to give it. Which again is what makes evolution such a frustrating topic to discuss.

    But to the point on genetic mutation I am not an expert either, but in thinking about it, there are people passing on all sorts of genes they couldn't before because of medicine keeping people with formerly life ending diseases alive long enough to procreate, humans have gotten progressively taller, again I would presume because of diet at least in part, children are hitting puberty earlier because of the crap we put in food etc. So is that evolution or self created change? Don't know what you call it, one would also wonder if they are "temporary" changes, i.e. if we lived like we had before would we change back? Don't know but assume so.
  6. tim85
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    tim85 Well-Known Member

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    Definitely interesting to think about, ora. Personally, being a pretty hairy dude myself, I often wonder where down the line in my genes was the need for so much hair? Perhaps someone living in a colder climate, or perhaps in a forest to protect from bugs? Or both?

    It's interesting to wonder how temporary these changes are, definitely. If we were to live in a colder climate for a couple of hundred years, would we start to develop traits that better prepared us for that type of climate?
  7. lacuna
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    lacuna Well-Known Member

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    Reading your comment referencing brain growth reminded me of an interesting theory proposed by a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at LSU some years ago. Edwin A. Bowman, M.D. theorizes the increasing size of the human brain necessitated an increase in the size of the vaginal canal. For the sexual act to remain satisfying and productive a corresponding increase also occurred in the human penis.

    http://download.springer.com/static...097_f57a7446d5aa7a91d5fed22be38e762c&ext=.pdf

    http://www.deepdyve.com/lp/springer...s-is-larger-than-in-the-great-apes-2UOZBuQWH5
  8. candymanfromgc
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    candymanfromgc Well-Known Member

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    I didn't come from a monkey. Nor did my ancestors.
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  9. dangolegators
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    dangolegators Well-Known Member

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    I believe humans are the only mammal known to eat this. Human males in particular are known to eat it, but a certain percentage of human females eat it as well.
  10. dangolegators
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    dangolegators Well-Known Member

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    Well, you did. Sorry.
  11. reformedgator
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    reformedgator Premium Member

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    Certainly true, but we do share the same creator.
  12. channingcrowderhungry
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    channingcrowderhungry Well-Known Member

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    How do you feel about your non-monkey body being made up of roughly 90% stardust?
  13. orangeblueorangeblue
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    orangeblueorangeblue Well-Known Member

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    It's possible to be Christian and also believe in evolution. Sort of liberating, too.
  14. wgbgator
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    wgbgator Sub-optimal Poster Premium Member

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    The real quesiton is: were humans designed to beat their meat?
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  15. asuragator
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    asuragator Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely!
  16. orangeblueorangeblue
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    orangeblueorangeblue Well-Known Member

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    I'm pretty sure that's how opposable thumbs evolved.
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  17. 108
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    108 Premium Member

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    hadn't thought about that...makes sense

    and it's generally hard to say what humans were "designed" to do, as we have the ability to make complex choices

    and our choices evolve us


    curious, what is the science of when we were able to do this?
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2013
  18. CHFG8R
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    CHFG8R Premium Member

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    I think it stands to reason that major changes (evolutionary or otherwise) had an effect pre-fire as the mere process of harnessing fire required something above and beyond the typical animal.

    On a side note, saw a very interesting show on dogs on PBS once that made a great point about that (developing the cooperative relationship) being one of the key turning points in our evolution. Allowed us to provide security, hunt better, key factor in further animal domestication), etc. Really changed human behavior.
  19. CHFG8R
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    Interesting. I remember hearing somewhere that the human penis is larger than any other ape species.
  20. tegator80
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    tegator80 Well-Known Member

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    On a strictly evolutionary basis, my thought was that the muscles that allow the thumb dexterity was the first step. That allowed a more capable brain to accomplish more things. And then larger brains had the means for even more technological enhancements. The cooking of the food seems to be an interesting concept for eliminating a big chunk of the energy usage.
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