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U.S. producing 'abysmally low' number of primary care doctors

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by mocgator, Jun 17, 2013.

  1. mocgator
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    mocgator Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to socialized medicine and obama's America. Utterly predictable..

    http://www.breitbart.com/system/wire/upiUPI-20130614-235806-4920

    Despite a shortage of U.S. primary care doctors, less than 25 percent of new doctors go into this field, and fewer still work in rural areas, researchers say.

    Lead study author Dr. Candice Chen, an assistant research professor of the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, said the study also found only 4.8 percent of the new primary care physicians set up shop in rural areas.

    Currently, the United States is producing primary care physicians at rates that are "abysmally low," Chen said.
  2. wgbgator
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    wgbgator Sub-optimal Poster Premium Member

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    We're not producing them because their job is becoming obsolete. Also, its a trend that dates back to the 1990s.

    http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp068155

  3. GatorRade
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    GatorRade Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, this has been an area for concern for a long time.
  4. wgbgator
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    wgbgator Sub-optimal Poster Premium Member

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    Perhaps we can start a thread lamenting the declining number of travel agents, record company execs and newspaper men being prodcued.
  5. MichiGator2002
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    MichiGator2002 VIP Member

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    It is sure to turnaround now that the likely income will be down, workload up, and cost and length of education aren't changing.
  6. rivergator
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    rivergator Well-Known Member

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    So, in 2006, less that 20 percent of doctors were going into primary care. In the most recent study, 25 percent are going into primary care. And it's Obama's fault that the number is so low?
  7. wgbgator
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    wgbgator Sub-optimal Poster Premium Member

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    The money has been in specialization for quite some time. Most of the things primary care doctors did can be done by non-doctors. If a position can be de-skilled, it will be. That's pretty much what capitalism does.
  8. wgbgator
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    wgbgator Sub-optimal Poster Premium Member

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    Well, on the plus side, the Obama presidency has finally made conservatives more aware of long term trends. The national security state, healthcare, declining wages. :grin:
  9. MichiGator2002
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    MichiGator2002 VIP Member

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    It is moot. Whether they can or can't, they will certainly have to be done by non-doctors. But, hey, I am sure having the jobs of RNs done by $8/hr "professionals" who have about much medical training as a 20 year old guy in the Wal-Mart garden center knows about plants, so that the jobs of the doctors can be done by the RNs... that won't lead to any missed diagnoses and vital referrals to your beloved specialists not being made.

    Nothing can go wrong with this plan.
  10. wgbgator
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    wgbgator Sub-optimal Poster Premium Member

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    Q: If you were in med school today, would you choose primary care practice over a more lucrative specialization?
  11. wgbgator
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    wgbgator Sub-optimal Poster Premium Member

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    I'm not saying de-skilling is a great thing, I'm just saying that the economic system we live under makes this state of affairs rather inevitable. I liked going to record stores and books stores too. Not to mention reading the newspaper. But technology and economics arent terribly sentimental about making jobs or beloved institutions obsolete.
  12. The_Graygator
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    The_Graygator Well-Known Member

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    Think it's low now?

    Wait until Obamacare is fully implemented.

    (Oh, but we can keep our doctors someone said...) Suuuurrre, riiiight. :roll:
  13. oldgator
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    oldgator Premium Member

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    Where are you Moc?
  14. mocgator
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    mocgator Well-Known Member

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    I'm at work saving lives and employing people... where are you?


    You can jump in the bushes all you'd like... the quality of Health Care professionals is going to start dropping. It can be no other way.
  15. oldgator
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    oldgator Premium Member

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    Evidently you are not of the health profession for any length of time or you would have been very aware of the decline in primary care physicians for decades now. Or you just prefer to ignore that fact and post a very misleading article from that fount of spin(ultra-con website not so bright Breibart).

    This issue predates the 1990's and has been increasing over the years.

    A main sufferer of a lack of primary care physician has been rural towns/counties. Some of those towns/counties years ago were so desperate to get a primary care physician that they offered to pay for med school if the doctor would work in that town/county as a primary care physician. there weren't many takers of the offer. And many of those who did accept the offer did one of the following
    ---renege on the contract
    ---serve minimal number of years as a primary care MD per the contract but as soon as contract obligation was up they went to better paying location or got into a specialty.

    Maybe you should start to save lives by not speaking of what you know little to nothing about
  16. MichiGator2002
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    MichiGator2002 VIP Member

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    sub-zero wins!
  17. austingtr
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    austingtr VIP Member

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    And yet all the propaganda and incentives to push people into primary care have failed. When I was in med school in the early nineties, they pushed hard for primary care. Offers to get rid of your student loans are there by the dozens.

    But people don't go to med school to do nothing. And many primary care physicians all they do is much of nothing, and get paid crap.
  18. sappanama
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    sappanama VIP Member

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    Sadly some was brought on by FP and IM doctors inviting in midlevels to open more spots on the schedule and generate more revenue for the practice. Fast forward thirty years and the midlevel lobby has pushed through practice independence at nearly the same reimbursement rates. Anesthesia did a similar thing with CRNAs arguing that nearly all cases could be done by them with minimal supervision, fast forward thirty years and you see that they participated in their own marginalization, many small hospitals have no physician anesthesia and that falls back on them
  19. oldgator
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    oldgator Premium Member

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    similar sort of shortage occurred for many years in regard to medsurg nurses in hospitals.

    For years working bedside care in a hospital in the general medsurg type stations was the 'entry point' for nurses desiring to work more specialized areas of nursing(ED, OR, ICU, Ortho, Onc, etc). And the typical route was for a new grad to work two years med surg and ten go on to see about getting one of the coveted openings in a more specialized area. What ended up happening in many hospitals was about half the hospital's patient care wings would be staffed by nurses with minimal experience(getting their two years of experience before transferring to a specialized area) along with a few nurses who either loved the med surg setting or were not accepted for one of the specialized areas. this tended to result in crappy medsurg wings generating malpractice suits, poor level of care, etc due to lack of experience and or skill. Hospitals tried to deal with that by one means or another. But finally realized that recognition of medsurg as a nursing specialty along with pay scale competitive to some degree with other specialties was the only way effective in having it so medsurg stations could improve(increasing hospital profits).

    Primary Care medicine is a recognized specialty but that is not enough to have doctors go into and stay in primary care.

    problem is, cast majority of primary care MD's are in private practice. That means that they don't get paid beyond what they themselves can bring thru the doors. A solution is for hospitals to have a department of primary care department attached as an ancillary department linked to the hospital. It would reduce the cost of omedical office costs for the primary care MD's. Along with other reduced costs. Plus it would generate patients for them via the ER. Rural counties can set this sort of thing up if there is a general hospital in the county.

    Key is raising pay for the primary care MD's..that can be done by the following
    ---increasing number of patients
    ---charging more per patient
    ---reducing costs related to their medical practice
  20. dynogator
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    dynogator Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to moc blaming Obama for a decades-long trend. Also, utterly predictable. :roll:

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