Tuition is it fair?

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by sappanama, Jun 26, 2013.

  1. sappanama
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    sappanama VIP Member

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    My brother sent me an article which was interesting, I hadn't actually thought of this.

    http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2021250505_westneat23xml.html
    Made me think what I paid?what they pay today



    Florida universities had the lowest tuition increases in the country between 1978 and 1988, according to regents figures. Undergraduate tuition rose from $709 to $1,168, about 64 percent, compared with a national average increase from $757 to $1,828, or a 141.5 percent increase.
  2. sappanama
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    sappanama VIP Member

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    Is the increase primarily due to student loans? Or what, if milk had done the same it would cost 15dollars, gas would be 6.30, what is it
  3. GatorNorth
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    GatorNorth Premium Member Premium Member

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    No, the increase ihas mostly been to fund the construction of first class amenities that our collective Gen Y'ers have grown to expect. Tuition in general has increased by double or triple the inflation.
  4. ncbullgator
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    ncbullgator Well-Known Member

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    Tuition has risen, in part, to pay for the million dollar pension payouts to administrators, professors, and staff.

    :sick:
  5. QGator2414
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    QGator2414 VIP Member

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    Can't really quantify fair.

    That said I do think the next bubble will be student loans. And I do think part of the big rise in tuition comes from the easy money.
  6. MichiGator2002
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    If the college student vote wasn't just about the easiest lay in the Democrats date book, I half expected Obama to try to forgive some loan principal to get reelected.
  7. Row6
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    Row6 New Member

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    As pointed out in the article linked in the OP, tuition increases at state U's are primarily a result of state legislatures cutting funding, a bad trend which further makes State U's parking lots for Daddy's Audi gift, with no rooms for bicycles. Nationally, the average income of families with kids in State U's has continually risen.
  8. gatorman_07732
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    gatorman_07732 Well-Known Member

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    No, the rise in tuition has to do with easy money and the availability of student loans.
  9. Row6
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    You're wrong. Look it up.
  10. T3goalie
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    True. The increase in tuition can be tracked in direct line with fed guaranties and loans. Easy money, beat the drum that everyone needs a college education, and created demand...

    A friend of mine has 2 sons ages 27 and 28. One went to a prestigious 4 year college, has a liberal arts degree and a masters. The other became a plumber. Guess which one owns his business and make 2 1/2 times what his brother makes. And guess which one still has over $150K in student loans.
    • Like Like x 1
  11. tegator80
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    tegator80 Well-Known Member

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    My take on history:

    Someone did a study and found that college (read 4-year) graduates made a better living in their lifetimes than non-college people. The study was simplistic and fraught with unsubstantiated claims of fact, kind of like the study that shows that home owners are better citizens than non-home owners. You can also make the claim that married people are better citizens than non-married people. It leaves a LOT of misguided interpretation between cause and effect versus the motivation and priorities of the people who were used in the studies.

    Back to education. Once the study "proved" that a piece of paper saying that you were "smart" was a "good investment" then there was a movement underway to get everyone a piece of paper. That in itself was a major shift in the supply and demand for quality persons. It also blurred the line between the capable people and those who bought a piece of paper since they look the same on an application.

    Now the Federal Government, with the clear endorsement (funding?) of expansion of the university system and resources to meet the demand for students turned institutions of acquiring knowledge into money-making ventures. Then the University Presidents became more CEO's of major corporations instead of academicians. Now they have built the infrastructure to make big money (read new shiny facilities) and the means to feed the beast (the original study). But if you turn off the money then the system collapses, kind of like the current Federal budget situation.

    Tuition increases are merely the beast doing what it is now designed to do. And student loans are the next big bubble to burst, if we allow it. My take is that we won't.
  12. gatorman_07732
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    gatorman_07732 Well-Known Member

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    So how do you explain the rise in private universities?
  13. QGator2414
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    QGator2414 VIP Member

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    It should not be forgotten that tech schools prey on the guaranteed student loans as well. On top of getting the federal government out of the loan and education business it would be nice if we could get it out of our hi schools as well so communities had the flexibility to create better tech programs for their high school students.

    Our last full time hire was entering the second year of a 2 year program for the position they were hired for when we offered them the job and to pay for the necessary credentials. They were fortunate to only spend the money on one year of the program IMO...
  14. sappanama
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    sappanama VIP Member

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    1-Over the last 5 years tuition has risen 12+,15+,15+,12+, and8+%.why? It can't be the buildings only.
    2- the raises began in earnest in 1985, IMO it was tied to the great con of the education lottery, with its extra money for education promise. Not suspecting the state would shift the budget in amounts eerily similar to the amount the lottery brought in, not just for colleges but for k-12 schools.
    3- the rise in dollars and the number of student loan programs legislation has again only imo shifted an unbearable load onto the students. For the supposedly brightest ( professors, and university administrators) they sure missed the boat, effectively saddling many students with a mortgage and a degree with little chance of paying it off.
    4- the myth seems to be that now we are living in a time where college has never been easier, or more expected, to attend, when in fact my era and those prior had it easier. Who perpetuated that myth, who benefits from it.
    5- how do we avoid the bubble?
  15. GatorBen
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    GatorBen Well-Known Member

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    If it's a prestigious college, you don't need to note that it is a 4 year school. I don't think there is such a thing as a prestigious community college.
  16. WESGATORS
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    So what do you want? More subsidy or more supply & demand? If tuition was too high, you wouldn't see so many people applying.

    Go GATORS!
    ,WESGATORS
  17. icequeen
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    icequeen Well-Known Member

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    All I know is that my daughter wants to be a Gator...my 4-year-old son won't take off his Gator helmet and says he wants to play football and golf for Florida. My daughter will, therefore, move in with grandma and grandpa in Gainesville, do the time-honored tradition of working at Publix for a year, and then go to school as an in-state tuition.

    My son, however, is already sinking >10-foot puts and can throw a spiral across the great room and accurately hit me on the side of the head when he wants to, so I'm thinking sports will be his route to school :laugh:

    It's just like everything else, though - a lot of professors/administrators (mostly administrators) have gotten these crazy packages and now everyone has to foot the bill.
  18. Row6
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    Row6 New Member

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    Great and good luck to your kids! The biggest problem with rising tuition is declining state support through their legislatures.
  19. mdgator05
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    mdgator05 Premium Member

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    That is the part nobody wants to discuss because it doesn't fit neatly into a political bucket. However, the fact that tuition has increased so much but the number of people applying has increased rapidly is the most important aspect in this discussion.

    Tuition increases because people are willing to pay more for tuition. As our economy changes, college is becoming more important. Many traditional blue collar manufacturing jobs are not going to be available to people leaving high school. So it leads to wider splits in income between college graduates and non-college graduates. Whether the mechanism is based on the actual knowledge obtained in college or some form of a signal of quality is really a tertiary matter. As long as people are willing to pay more for a product, the providers of that product are foolish for not charging more for that product. This is true in pretty much any industry and is a basic tenant of pricing theory.
  20. VAg8r1
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    VAg8r1 Well-Known Member

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    FYI - The Federal Guaranteed Student Loan Program dates back to 1965. The first federal student loan program dates back to 1958. Tuition did not begin increasing at a rate significantly higher than the overall rate of inflation until decades later. Although they may be a minor factor, student loans are not the cause of the rise of in tuition. My guess is that the rise in tuition at public universities is primarily attributable to reduced subsidies from state legislatures combined significantly higher compensation for faculty and administrators.

    link

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