Thoughts on MLM jobs...

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by ArtVandelay, Jun 20, 2014.

  1. ArtVandelay
    Online

    ArtVandelay Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2011
    Messages:
    3,552
    Likes Received:
    113
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Location:
    South Florida
    Ratings Received:
    +416
    anyone familiar with BeachBody and ACN?

    These are two of the more recognized MLM opportunities. I believe they are scams based on what I hear from the people offering these "opportunities".

    What are your thoughts?
  2. GatorMid
    Online

    GatorMid Premium Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2007
    Messages:
    1,124
    Likes Received:
    17
    Trophy Points:
    38
    Ratings Received:
    +53
    Some MLMs peddle a tangible and often times high quality product....

    My wife peddled jewelry for one....she stayed at home with the kids and liked the jewelry herself, eventually deciding to sign up to sell when so many others noticed and liked it too. Soon she had many women wanting to have parties and could bring in $300 a night pretty easily for 4-5 hours of work. Doing that once or twice a week was nice for us. She even earned a dang nice vacation to Cancun in her first year. The jewelry was pretty nice, handmade, reasonably priced, etc. The management team for the company had Ivy league graduates in executive positions and had been fairly successful. Eventually the styles aren't in as much demand and the slower economy resulted in less and less people wanting to buy....she hasn't done a party in a long time.

    However, many of those MLMs are so far over the top on the claims they make for their products and the way they push the sales force to focus more on signing people up than the actual sales. The signup fees keep the scheme going.

    ACN is one of the worst though, which relies on deceit and is not much more than a Ponzi scheme.

    Just a few observations from someone who had no time for those kinds of businesses and couldn't hardly stand being around the folks who sold for them. I wasn't excited at all about my wife signing up for hers, but like I said, it seemed to operate differently than my understanding of the vast majority of them.
  3. AzCatFan
    Offline

    AzCatFan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2007
    Messages:
    7,563
    Likes Received:
    195
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ratings Received:
    +547
    If the MLM focuses on selling a product to a end-user first, and recruiting second, if you think the product is worth it, the MLM may be worth it. But if the MLM focuses on recruiting people selling under you down the line, it's a glorified Ponzi scheme and chances are, if you join, you will lose money buying worthless things just to make a quota.

    And don't fall for a lot of claims made by the more questionable MLM's like they are cheaper because they cut out middlemen and you purchase direct from for producer. While true a product bought through MLM may touch less hands from production to home, MLM's add their own middlemen layers of people (upline) that add to the cost of every product sold.

Share This Page