They better listen to the fans...

Discussion in 'Swamp Gas' started by ArtVandelay, Sep 16, 2013.

  1. HungaryGator
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    HungaryGator New Member

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    based on what evidence?

    I'm willing to entertain any reasonable arguments on this but I'm beyond sick of people just regurgitating mediot talking points backed by no evidence whatsoever.

    here are the relevant facts:

    1) the contract with the city pays the franchise well and has a very large buyout for the team - which makes it difficult to see how moving would not be a financially losing prospect.

    2) fan support was better than for a dozen other franchises including both others in Florida.....so why would one of these not be moving instead?

    let's hear it.
  2. tilly
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    tilly Superhero Moderator VIP Member

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  3. g8tr96
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    g8tr96 Administrator VIP Member

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    http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/news?slug=jc-cole_jacksonville_jaguars_new_owner_los_angeles_112911

    Before you get too far down the road with the idea of the Los Angeles Jaguars, understand that moving the team from Jacksonville isn’t as simple as it might seem. Not today, not a year from now and probably not even four or five years down the line.
    Never mind that outgoing owner Wayne Weaver, who saved new owner Shahid Khan the trouble by firing coach Jack Del Rio on Tuesday before announcing the sale, promised that Khan has no plans to move the team. Never mind that Khan put out a public statement saying he was fully committed to bringing Jacksonville its first Super Bowl victory. Just remember that there’s a lease to get out from underneath and it runs through the 2027 season. The lease has one very difficult threshold the team must cross before it can get out, says former Jacksonville Mayor John Delaney, a lawyer who helped write the deal.
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    [​IMG] Shahid Khan

    “The team would have to show that because of lack of attendance it’s losing money for three straight years and that’s probably a difficult thing for an NFL team to do,” Delaney said. “That’s there for if the city doesn’t support the team. If we don’t, we shouldn’t stick the team with a long-term lease. But if we support it, they can’t just pretend they’re losing and expect to get out.”
    Marc Ganis, the president of SportsCorp, backed that sentiment. Ganis has reviewed the 100-page lease between the team and the city and said it’s “one of the more difficult leases you’ll see for a team to get out of.”
    [ Related: Jack Del Rio fired as Jaguars stumble to 3-8 ]
    That threshold, more than the actual money that’s owed to pay off the lease, stands in the way of a possible quick move of the team. In the mid-1990s, Delaney says the city took out approximately $115 million in bonds for improvements on what is now EverBank Field. Delaney guessed the rough amount of the payoff on the bonds would be “in the area of $60 million.” For a team planning to move, that’s not significant.
    “The city you’re moving to would pay that off very quickly if that’s all you’re talking about,” Ganis said.
    But fighting through the first threshold could be difficult, if not far more expensive. Under the growing television revenue the NFL receives, teams have never been more profitable. The average value of an NFL team has climbed to approximately $1 billion. In August, Jacksonville was ranked by Forbes as the NFL’s least valuable team at $725 million.
    “Even if the team declared that it was losing money, the issue would be litigated and all the books from the team would be subpoenaed,” Delaney said. Litigation could take a year or two, making the quickest the team could leave more than four years away. In addition, the NFL is generally averse to having team financial records made public.
    “Could you find a way out of the lease? Yes, but it’s going to take some very serious work and there’s going to be a lot of uncertainty along the way,” Delaney said. “People in that situation don’t like uncertainty.”
  4. regurgigator
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    regurgigator VIP Member

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    Like Charlie, raycgator don't surf.
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