The turning point - to gain or lose?

Discussion in 'Gator Country Health and Fitness' started by ThomasGoldkamp, Feb 21, 2012.

  1. oI2ange
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    oI2ange Premium Member

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    lol yeah, i was going to write something like this but held off...not really saying you're wrong, thomas, but 4% is insane (8% is as well).
  2. ThomasGoldkamp
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    ThomasGoldkamp New Member

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    Yeah, when I got that done at the student rec facility they showed me a chart that said that put me in the "extremely unhealthy" category. I want to say the next category was like 8-12% is "unhealthy." Not entirely sure I understand how that works, because I've always been healthy as a horse. I haven't actually checked my body fat percentage since I got it done on campus two years ago. Could be higher than what I guesstimated.
  3. ThomasGoldkamp
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    ThomasGoldkamp New Member

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    I used an online calculator based on hip size, waist size, navel size, neck size, height and weight and got 15.15%. So you guys were right on the eight percent. Also makes me think the PT that did measurement a few years ago was wrong. Although they did the "pinch" test, using the pinch thing on the thigh, chest and stomach. I don't know if that affects the measurement or how it would change it.
  4. LeafUF
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    LeafUF Well-Known Member

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    Could have just been user error. Caliper tests can be way off plus only using a three point test can be less accurate than say a 7 point test. 15% is still not bad and puts you in a better situation than most Americans. Anyway, the number does not really matter as much as the mirror.
  5. Dreamliner
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    Dreamliner Well-Known Member

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    Don't feel bad. As a rule of thumb, I tell people to DOUBLE their bodyfat estimate. I'm skeptical of anything other than sophisticated equipment and that can be expensive. If you really are around 15% that is certainly leaner than average for a man.

    For perspective, you might check out the picture of my son on my blog. Most people look at his picture, see his abs and guess single digits bodyfat. His bodyfat percentage was measure at 14% using sophisticated equipment:

    http://www.fitnessbydale.com/blog/

    Tell you the truth, as a trainer, I never work off bodyfat estimates. For most people, how you look, how you feel, how your clothes fit are the telling indicators.
  6. ThomasGoldkamp
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    ThomasGoldkamp New Member

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    Dream, I'm really intrigued by your thoughts on working out less frequently. I almost wonder if that's why I've seen big strength gains lately. I've been working out back/biceps, chest/tri and legs/shoulders with about two to three days rest between each. It's working better than when I used to do chest/tri, legs/shoulders, one day rest, back/bi, all, two days rest, repeat.
  7. Dreamliner
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    Dreamliner Well-Known Member

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    Thomas, think about two factors: (1) intensity (2) recovery. Based on my observations, most trainees don't work out very hard, not really. If they're spending an hour or more training, how can they be working hard ?

    Further, people seem to get the impression that they get stronger from training. Technically, you get stronger from RESTING FROM TRAINING. Hit it hard. Then back off and give your body a chance to do its thing. The research is in and it shows that that takes longer than anyone previously imagined.

    Only a fool would reason that, if two Tylenol every eight hours was good for shoulder pain, that eight Tylenol every two hours would be even better. But in a sense, that's how we go about exercise.

    Think about dose-response as well. In other words, for efficiency's sake, what is the optimal dosage for strength training ? Based on the link I provided, the evidence certainly does seem to suggest that, provided the effort is high ... surprisingly little. No, I mean SURPRISINGLY little!

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