The Hole in Our Collective Memory: How Copyright Made Mid-Century Books Vanish

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by philnotfil, Jul 31, 2013.

  1. philnotfil

    philnotfil Well-Known Member

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    Always interesting to look at how policy actually works once implemented in the real world.

    theatlantic.com

  2. tideh8rGator

    tideh8rGator Well-Known Member

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    All this business of "copyright infringement" just does 2 things:

    1. Makes mass media and the "connected" elites in the journalistic and literary world become an even more monolithic, closed exclusive "club" with absolute control over print

    2. Enforces the idea than NO private individuals should ever have ownership of intellectual works, that all info, print matter, etc. must be held and filtered by the Internet and its minions. Books may disappear in the future not because they wear out but because "someone" decides print matter should only come to you on a streaming, PPV, proprietary basis. No libraries. No bookshelves in your home. They want music media to be controlled the same way. No CDs. No DVDs.

    Don't think it can't happen.
  3. corpgator

    corpgator Well-Known Member

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    Thank God for torrents and Usenet. The amount of information stored on them is immense. They basically use the distributed server method to create a secure backup of everything Also, we luckily have Google's quixotic quest to scan and make available online every book ever written.

    Funnily enough, the 3 largest video game torrent sites all went down within the last year. 2 hosted recent games. 1 just came back. The other was by far the largest site on the internet for video games and is gone for good.

    The third was dedicated to games considered dead: the PS2/GC/DC generation and older. The vast majority of those games can't even be purchased anymore and probably 10% were only available there as nowhere else on the internets could these games be found. EA had their servers taken because they had a soccer game from the mid-90s they didn't give them permission to use although it wasn't for sale anywhere else.

    Anyway, that site will be back up soon. It's amazing really. These underground sites are there because the content simply isn't available either for a reasonable price or at all. Huge swaths of records that can't be found anywhere else, TV shows, Movies and on it goes.
  4. akaijenkins1

    akaijenkins1 Active Member

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    As a filmmaker, this is a very hot topic for me. Love the example sited by the OP, when I saw my film on BitTorrent my reaction was quite different than I expected: I smiled.

    I see both sides of it, particularly as someone who's created and sold a piece of IP to a larger entity and then watched as the availability of that IP in product form was lessened rather than increased under the umbrella of said entity, reducing the number of people who could see it... basically anyone outside the continental US.

    Have always loved the fashion industry's take on this: there is no copyright in that industry, just trademark:

    <object width="420" height="315"><param name="movie" value="//www.youtube.com/v/zL2FOrx41N0?hl=en_US&amp;version=3"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="//www.youtube.com/v/zL2FOrx41N0?hl=en_US&amp;version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="420" height="315" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true"></embed></object>

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