"Texas teen makes violent joke during video game, is jailed for months"

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by philnotfil, Jun 29, 2013.

  1. philnotfil
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    philnotfil Well-Known Member

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    Freedom of speech? I actually don't have a problem with them investigating him to see if he has weapons or access to them, or a history of violence or mental health issues. But it seems like starting with jail is doing this backwards. And charging him with terrorist threats is just stupid.

    dailycaller.com

  2. scrappygator
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    scrappygator Active Member

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    This is stupid--in jail since March and they haven't figured it out.
    If they did this every time someone said something stupid on internet gaming there would be a lot more kids in jail.
    I mean, check him out, but this long and that sentence?
  3. neisgator
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    neisgator Belligerent Gator

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    Scary stuff.

    Oh, in case there is any doubt, I mean the government.
  4. kygator
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    kygator Well-Known Member

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    "Authorities noted that recent school shootings like the one in Newtown, Connecticut have caused them to evaluate all potential threats seriously."

    That excuse from the police, school administrators, and prosecutors is repeated over and over to try to justify their stupidity. Take threats seriously but don't throw common sense and wisdom out the window.
  5. MichiGator2002
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    MichiGator2002 VIP Member

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    Don't worry... as long as we all cook out and raise a seasonally red, white, and blue beer bottle next Thursday, freedom still lives.

    Right?
  6. gatorchamps0607
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    gatorchamps0607 Always Rasta Premium Member

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    I don't advocate this type of behavior anywhere but jailed since March for words and (im assuming, I didn't read the article) no other evidence that points towards him actually planning anything? Thats BS.
  7. Minister_of_Information
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    Minister_of_Information I'm your huckleberry Premium Member

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    PBR is RWB year round.
  8. oldgator
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    oldgator Premium Member

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    bottom line of this topic is

    what 'threats' if any should authorities take seriously?

    saying it was 'just a joke' seems like an easy 'get out of jail comment afterwards.

    A person in a theatre yells 'fire'---people start running for the doors and the person then yells 'it's just a joke' and right then a person gets trampled in the stampede and injured. Are you saying that the person who yelled 'fire' should not be arrested just because he yelled 'it was just a joke' a few moments later.

    When we say or do things we are responsible for what we said, and those words can be apologized for later or say 'it was just a joke' later. But we are still responsible for our words and deeds.

    My question is---who old was the person who made the threat in the online game...if it was a child in grade school I'd dismiss charges. However if the person is 15 or older then that person should know right from wrong and be held accountable.

    In any case if it does appear to be a case of a stupid kid shooting off his mouth then 8 months is too much time behind bars. 7 should have sufficed, or 6 or.....
  9. VAg8r1
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    VAg8r1 Well-Known Member

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    Why am I not surprised, it's Texas after all.
  10. g8orbill
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    g8orbill Gators VIP Member

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    I am surprised thta it happened in Texas

    if they felt the need to pick him up and check him out then okay-but this much time in jail is rather insane
  11. Minister_of_Information
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    Minister_of_Information I'm your huckleberry Premium Member

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    Jonathan Swifte would have been kept under the jail nowadays.
  12. MichiGator2002
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    MichiGator2002 VIP Member

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    You actually have to be in the theatre to shout fire in a way that might trigger any sort of free speech exception. This off the cuff, agitated remark really couldn't create in a reasonable person a fear of imminent violence against them or against anyone else.
  13. scamgtr
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    scamgtr VIP Member

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    THIS...there has to be some sense that the threat be realistic. If the facts are as stated, I just don't see how this could be a realistic imminent fear in the audience of actual violence about to be carried out by the child making the threat. Additionally, there should be some sort of evidence of the furtherance of the threat for any other charge as well. There must be more to the story...otherwise this story doesn't make sense.
  14. oldgator
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    oldgator Premium Member

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    of course, you and I agree that a guy yelling 'fire' in a theater would pose an definite in your face threat. And we would certainly not attach the same sort of immediacy to a verbal threat in an online game. But bear in ind we are not talking about adults. The issue involved one youngster making a verbal threat and quite likely another youngster being the object of that threat. It is quite reasonable to expect that a child would view it as a real threat and we wouldn't.

    in any case I agree with majority of posters who believe the 8 months is going overboard.

    That the person in jail is 18 years old means that he is an adult and not a kid. Pretty much a lot of the stuff I've read is the 'boyz will be boyz' crap that Bewildered Bobby Bowden spouted when his FSU squad of delinquents were shoplifting ,brawling, DUI, breaking and entering. Also the same sort of 'boys will be boys' crap I've seen on Gator message boards when it comes to players like Hernandez, and others getting busted for some infraction of another while in college..

    At what age should a person be considered an adult and held to adult standards of conduct?

    If that 18(19 year old) has mental issues maybe the court should channel him in that direction. If not with mental issue he is where is because he threatened others. And it also seems his dad might have done better job at teaching his son to have a social awareness and responsibility.

    Another matter that was not mentioned at all, one way or another is---

    did the guy who is sitting in jail have past record of threatening others, violence against others, etc.
    ---if he has no such history of violence, his father should emphasize that in his public appeal
  15. MichiGator2002
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    MichiGator2002 VIP Member

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    Nah, even fire in a theatre has qualifiers, which is why the 'clear and present danger' test from the same case was narrowed later in Brandenburg.

    There should have been no reaction to this whatsoever other than, ideally, a call from one parent to another and some penalties to playing LoL. Should have been a total non-event with the civil authority, just like poptart kid should have been, and a billion other examples it feels like. The only zero tolerance we need right now is of the idea that the schools and/or government should be reacting to meaningless things. Stop trying to cast a really wide net and instead learn how to deduce and distinguish potential threats from idle babble.
  16. scamgtr
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    scamgtr VIP Member

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    The only problem with that is that even if it is a child, it still has to be reasonable; you can't move the goal posts because the person the "threat" is uttered to has a lower threshold of what a threat is. It is a reasonable person standard, not the standard of the victim. Moreover, there still needs to be some form of evidence that the person had the ability and means to carry out the threat. I don't see how the second part of that could be proved from what I read. That is why there must be more to this story.
  17. oldgator
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    oldgator Premium Member

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    "There should have been no reaction to this whatsoever other than, ideally, a call from one parent to another and some penalties to playing LoL. Should have been a total non-event with the civil authority, just like poptart kid should have been, and a billion other examples it feels like. The only zero tolerance we need right now is of the idea that the schools and/or government should be reacting to meaningless things. Stop trying to cast a really wide net and instead learn how to deduce and distinguish potential threats from idle babble."

    the operative word in the above is 'ideally'.

    back to my question---in other wording---what would you consider a 'threat' over the internet or other electronic communications? And what wouldn't? Where would you draw the line?
  18. MichiGator2002
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    MichiGator2002 VIP Member

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    Honestly? Threats on the internet should almost never be an issue for law enforcement on a single occurrence, unless there is some really, really compelling circumstances and content and specificity to it. Well, beyond this. For recurring threats, treat as would any non-internet situation.
  19. Minister_of_Information
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    Minister_of_Information I'm your huckleberry Premium Member

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    Or, we could just spy on everyone.
  20. oragator1
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    oragator1 Premium Member

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    Investigating someone for threats is fine. Throwing them in jail for no reason other than a statement that was followed by "just kidding" is insanity.

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