Strength training

Discussion in 'Gator Country Health and Fitness' started by jaxbeachgator, Nov 27, 2012.

  1. jaxbeachgator
    Offline

    jaxbeachgator VIP Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2007
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Jacksonville beach
    Ratings Received:
    +6
    After several years focusing on crossfit type training I have found myself enjoying getting back into your classic gym for weight training. Any suggestions on amount of reps/sets of exercises to increase strength. Historically, I've always been following the 3 set/ 10 rep type of regimen. However, I realize that may be somewhat out of date. Can't help it but I always fell compelled to work the core each workout.
  2. LeafUF
    Offline

    LeafUF Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2007
    Messages:
    13,451
    Likes Received:
    297
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Location:
    Wandering
    Ratings Received:
    +361
    If increased strength is your goal you will want to look at doing higher weights at lower reps. For pure strength I like to use rep ranges of 3-5. There are a lot of good programs you could look at if you are interested in following one instead of designing your own.
  3. Dreamliner
    Online

    Dreamliner Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    64,146
    Likes Received:
    236
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ratings Received:
    +1,032
    Transitioning from the Crossfit mindset, to a strength emphasis can be a challenge insofar as you are 'hooked' on the 'feel' of circuit-training or 'chasing the calorie burn.'

    For strength, it doesn't hurt to stretch out a bit, so to speak, and allow for rests between efforts.

    Now, IMO, you can get at least a bit of the best of both worlds. You can continue to work circuit-style, even with lower reps and heavier reps, so long as you don't: (A) lift to failure and (B) try to turn it into a cardio session.

    Ex: you could do a set of pullups, rest 30 seconds, do a set of dips, rest 30 seconds, do a set of deadlifts, rest one minute and repeat, something like that.
  4. jaxbeachgator
    Offline

    jaxbeachgator VIP Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2007
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Jacksonville beach
    Ratings Received:
    +6
    Thanks for the advice. Dream. I like your suggestion. That is something I'll attempt. You are right in the fact that you do indeed get hooked on the " calorie burn" type of workout. Been doing it for several years now. They can be fun and challenging. Also it can be motivating to work out as a group. However, it can take it's toll on the body. I've come to the conclusion I need to ease off, at least for a while.
  5. Dreamliner
    Online

    Dreamliner Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    64,146
    Likes Received:
    236
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ratings Received:
    +1,032
    Nothing wrong with easing off for awhile. Indeed, nothing wrong with easing off permanently. Consider it an investment in the future.

    And if it helps ease the transition - and this is not a knock on Crossfit - remember that that sort of conditioning is good for ... that kind of conditioning. That's not wordplay. It's just another way of saying that Crossfit is good for Crossfit. If you're not doing Crossfit, you simply don't need to pursue that particular mode of conditioning.

    If your primary goal is to be strong, look and FEEL good ... you can achieve that via conventional strength training and plenty of walking.

Share This Page