Skywalker

Discussion in 'Nuttin' but Net' started by taxman22, Jun 6, 2013.

  1. bullish
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    bullish Well-Known Member

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    Northcaptiva, do you like UF's football team, I am sure there are players on the team who also "ain't got no pencil". Basketball with fewer players are always in the spotlight due to smaller numbers on the teams. Chris is a world class basketball player who one day will be in the pros. If he qualifies, UF's Billy Donavon will be elated. Players like him only come by every so often. People coaching him on all the teams he plays on are telling him he is great and this is his meal ticket. This is where kids like him don't focus on school because of his physical talent. He understands now what it is going to take to get in, I hope he does and plays all four years and gets better guidance in life for what it takes to be successful.
  2. themistocles
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    themistocles Well-Known Member

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    The best preparation for taking any of utterly meaningless and essentially worthless standardized tests, whether the FCAT, the SAT, the ACT, the CEEB, the GRE, the GMAT, the LSAT, etc., etc., etc., is to read widely due to the inherent language bias they all carry (my research indicates that at least 25% of the quantitative score on such tests, in fact is strictly language skill based). Actually, I should note that the FCAT is likely the "most valid" of all of those I noted, not that this means "very valid."

    There are a couple of key methods that one should apply any time they are taking a test:
    1 - any time you run across an item that you can't immediately put down a likely response for, go on the the next question and continue the test. All such tests are speeded, which works against females and those who take their time prior to coming to decisions. They reward quick responders and deciders. At the end, when you go back to such questions, you will discover that your subconscious mind (which is always working), will very likely have provided you with the "best" answer. It is really amazing how well that works - I figured it out when I was in high school and used it effectively through many different such tests.

    2 - Do not, under any circumstances, put in an all-nighter studying before such broad-based tests. Actually, getting good and stoned the night before will tend to loosen and improve your mental activities when you actually take such tests. Adequate sleep is a very good idea.

    3 - Finally - always put down a response to every question. Penalties have pretty much gone the way of all flesh, and, as Rhine's research clearly showed, humans have an innate tendency to have a higher percentage of hits than random probability in all such circumstances.

    Here is a rather extensive explication regarding the "real" reason such things are used to exclude prospective students from access to "elite" institutions: http://tinyurl.com/mcwa9du - I submitted this to both the Harvard Educational Review and Higher Education Research, but neither editor would even have it reviewed for publication (although an old friend of mine is now the Editor of Educational Researcher, another person, who, like me, tends to push the limits of traditional beliefs and base his judgements on what he observers rather than "what is written").

    Here is a more recent one regarding their usefulness in minority admissions (essentially zilch): http://tinyurl.com/mjnxngp
  3. StrangeGator
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    StrangeGator Well-Known Member

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    That's similar to the advice my daughter got (except getting stoned the night before) from her prep classes, which she took after the first try. It was still a long road for her. She's dyslexic and has a hard time reading through the more verbose questions to get the answer section. But those strategies and just the experience of taking the test over and over helped her. Her twin brother got a 35 on his first try without any prepping.

    I don't know what difference the private prep tutoring makes over the prep classes, but her friends who had tutors scored the highest and got into the best schools, most of whom had similar GPAs. To your point, her best friend, who is African American and economically disadvantaged, had a 4.7 GPA but couldn't get higher than a 24 on multiple attempts.

    Just saw photos of the top 12 grads from the most recent class at their high school. At least three or four of them were African American. All the caucasian kids are off to Yale, Harvard, Williams, Columbia, Stanford and the like. The black kids are all going to state schools. My guess is that few of them could crack that 33-35 barrier where the elite colleges draw their lines. I know there are different standards for minority students, but they aren't made public, so most of them don't bother applying.

    Back to Chris Walker, I have to think that an African American growing up in Bonifay, FL could not possibly be more culturally disadvantaged. My brother taught AP European history at a high school in nearby Bay County for the last two years and was astonished how little his students knew about the world.
  4. gator1986
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    gator1986 Well-Known Member

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    So did he get in?
  5. Osiris_DPM
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    Osiris_DPM Premium Member

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    Bullis knows exactly what's up. As he always says, things in recruiting are fluid and things change by the day. I think Bullis is still bearish on Chris. But a couple big benchmarks came back positive since he posted that and that's a great thing.
  6. StrangeGator
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    StrangeGator Well-Known Member

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    I feel good about the situation now. Taking and passing enough classes, even in Bonifay gets you most of the way there. I don't have much faith in the FCAT, but at least it carries weight at Florida universities. If you pass that, you can't be far from a 17 on the ACT.
  7. Osiris_DPM
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    Osiris_DPM Premium Member

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    He will get all of the remaining requirements satisfied over the summer. The thing to worry about now is the NCAA Clearinghouse. They have dragged their heels and delayed on more than one occasion.
  8. InstiGATOR1
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    InstiGATOR1 Active Member

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    What has long encouraged me about C.Walker is that he seems reasonably literate and intelligent on twitter. [I do not follow teens on twitter, but I have seen various retweets of what he has tweeted and checked out his page from time to time.] I doubt he has an editor on twitter and thus I suspect he will get what he needs done.
  9. MadduxFanII
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    MadduxFanII Well-Known Member

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    That's what I've been mulling over. Walker failing to qualify in the spring is awful, but having the uncertainty drag through the summer and into fall would be absolutely infuriating.
  10. DoctorGator
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    DoctorGator Well-Known Member

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    I teach a graduate course in research methods at UF. The demographic profile of the students runs from domestic students that have received their undergrad degrees from FIU and Georgia Southern to Michigan and Washington Univ. of St. Louis. International students run from obscure Central and South American universities to Tsinghua U. in Beijing and IIT in India. We were discussing ethics in research and I asked the class of 26 to raise their hands if they were familiar with the Nuremburg Trials. Five hands went up. Five.

    The folks from "Bonifay" didn't know, but neither did the ones from "New York City." Kids, even smart ones, just are not interested in what is happening in the world. They are more interested in whether or not Big Macs are on sale this week than whether or not N. Korea really could drop an atomic warhead on an American city, or whether the President really has the authority to tell me what kind of light bulb I can buy.

    And we've exacerbated the problem by dropping History from the list of required college courses and Civics from the required middle and high school curriculim.
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  11. REM08
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    REM08 Well-Known Member

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    I think that's what this ultimately comes down to. Some of us have romantic notions that the teams we cheer for are full of scholarly student athletes who just happen to play a sport we enjoy (as a hobby really) while pursuing their dreams of a college education.

    But college basketball is what it is and, outside the ivy-leagues I guess, there aren't really exceptions. Coaches are paid WELL to win games. If the clearing house determines a kid eligible to enroll at your school, then why shouldn't a coach accept him? If Chris Walker had a clone out there named Charles Walker or something and Charles had a 4.0, then my guess is Billy would offer Charles first. But there is no Charles. Charles would get into UF as a general student if he were 5'10 and unathletic. Its probably a safe assumption that Chris would not.

    When you see some of these kids SAT/ACT scores (or hear about them I guess) or when you see their wonderlic's before the NFL, its odd to then think of what most of our college experiences were like and the kind of people we were around. We need to get used to the fact that most of our college experiences are nothing like what some college athletes' experiences are like. Apples and oranges. I'm not just talking about the women either. Because mine was probably similar when it came to the ladies. Same for you all right?:whistle:
  12. Osiris_DPM
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    Depends: are they "clones" like Stephan Urkelle and Steve Urkel? Or Cathy and Patty Duke? If so, I think he'd still go for Chris first.

    "Meet Charles, who's lived most everywhere, from Zanzibar to Barclay Square. But Chris's only seen the sight a boy can see from Bonifay Height -- What a crazy pair!

    But they're couuusins...identical cousins, all the way. One pair of matching bookends, different as night and day.

    Where Charles adores a minuet, the Ballet Russes, and crepe suzette; Our Chris loves to rock & roll, a hot dog makes him lose control -- What a wild duet!

    Still they're couuusins...identical cousins, and you'll find, they laugh alike, they walk alike, at times they even talk alike.

    You can lose your miiiiind...when couuusins, are two of a kind!"

    Oh the shenanigans those two kids pull. Charles and Chris really get a rise out of foolin Billy on account'a him not being able to tell them apart :)
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  13. StrangeGator
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    StrangeGator Well-Known Member

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    That was my brother's issue. Both his undergrad and grad degrees were in history. Two years of trying to get these kids, supposedly the best and brightest, he gave up. Just resigned from teaching to go back to military life, as a "consultant." I don't think he walked into this thing with his eyes open. This is the same county he was educated in. He should have known what to expect.
  14. GATORAZ
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    GATORAZ Well-Known Member

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    http://brockway.blogs.gatorsports.com/12084/walker-still-working-on-eligibility/

    update

  15. REM08
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    REM08 Well-Known Member

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  16. StrangeGator
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    StrangeGator Well-Known Member

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    I'm sure that he's okay with what his coach is saying. We've had this stuff served up to us in years past for football players. FWIW, Dallas Baker started off with a 14 ACT score, went to prep school and then finally ended up having a successful career at UF, including a 3.0 GPA.
  17. kygator
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    kygator Well-Known Member

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    "He’s improved each time, from 13 to 16,” White said.

    Since he only has the first 2 scores back, wouldn't that mean he improved one time? He makes it sound like there has been a pattern of improvement.
  18. Brewski
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    Brewski Well-Known Member

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    Keep reading the article...the FULL score isn't 13: "Walker’s scores in the ACT reflect just a partial score, not a sum score."
  19. REM08
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    REM08 Well-Known Member

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    No, its talking about the composit score which is the average of his scores from each of the four subject areas. If someone asked him what he got on his ACT, he would have said 13 (later would have answered with a 16). No one gives their sum score. A "perfect" score on the ACT is a 36. Sum scores can be higher than that.
  20. jmoliver
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    jmoliver Active Member

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    Too bad the kid isnt from Memphis.

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