Republicans in House Resist Overhaul for Immigration

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by Row6, Jul 11, 2013.

  1. AustinGator1
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    AustinGator1 Premium Member

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    Once again you are depending on a whole lot of people who have lied and broken the law to step up and trust this government. Just not going to happen. They know we screwed it up in the past and will most likely do so again. Please once again spare me how the laws were enforced in AZ, GA and AL. Your sample size is ONE year and during that year as pointed out by YOUR links the farmers started to make adjustments. There surely would be more adjustments if they were to continue to enforce the law. But they didn't have to because our government gave up and we went right back to not having the laws enforced. Not certain why you 'believe' all will be better this time. At some point you gotta realize until current laws are enforced nobody is going to believe new laws will be enforced.
  2. AzCatFan
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    AzCatFan Well-Known Member

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    In 1986, there were 5 million immigrants in the US, with about 4 million eligible for amnesty. 2.7 million (67.5% of eligible, and 54% of total) stepped up and trusted the government over 25 years ago. These are not your typical criminals. In general, they come to this country not to commit crimes, but because they feel they have no other option to make a living. The overwhelming majority of them, once they come into the country, are law-abiding, and would jump at the chance to become legal.

    As for my sample size, it's not large, but the fact that all three states quickly stopped enforcing their respective laws should say something to you. To me, it says that all three states realized they had made a mistake, and that enforcing laws was not a good fiscal option. Yes, some farmers adjusted, but many more would not be able.

    At some point, you have to believe the poison that enforcing current laws is. Again, it's a lesson learned the hard way in 1998 in the Vidalia onion fields. Or again, in 2006, with pears in Lake County, CA. If insanity is doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results, it's insane to think enforcing current laws now would have any different effect then what has happened over the past 15 years.

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