Report: AQ leadership damaged but new branches show appeal

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by Row6, Aug 10, 2013.

  1. Row6
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    Row6 New Member

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    Confirming what most probably thought, a security analysis finds the Pakistani based organization leadership pretty weakened but because of ideological appeal new affiliates - particularly in lawless N Africa - are popping up. The connection with OBL's AQ are tenuous.

    "Al-Qaida remains a significant threat to western targets as it "continues to diversify" into increasingly self-radicalised extremist groups, despite significant damage to its "core" leadership, according to an authoritative new United Nations report....

    The new report, the 14th issued by analysts working for the Security Council Committee which deals with sanctions on al-Qaida "and associated individuals and entities", is seen as non-partisan and rigorous. It draws on intelligence inputs from all member nations of the UN and academic work....

    One key question for analysts has been the influence of the remnant of al-Qaida's senior leadership based in Pakistan's restive western zones.

    Here the report is unequivocal.

    "Al-Qaida's core has seen no revival of its fortunes over the past six months. A degraded senior leadership based in the Afghanistan-Pakistan border region continues to issue statements, but demonstrates little ability to direct operations through centralised command and control," it says.

    The current leader of al-Qaida, the Egyptian-born Ayman al-Zawahiri, "has demonstrated little capability to unify or lead al-Qaida affiliates," which have become "more diverse and differentiated than before, united only by a loose ideology and a commitment to terrorist violence."

    Some of these affiliates are stronger than others, according to the report.

    "Some affiliates have been pushed back by military operations in Mali and Somalia, while others continue to pursue support by exploiting regional conflicts and grievances," it says..."

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/aug/07/al-qaida-threat-west-un
  2. MichiGator2002
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    MichiGator2002 VIP Member

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    There's a pretty common trope in movies where people are fighting, say, zombies, or vampires, or aliens, or robots, where they will work hard together and after great struggle kill the one zombie/vampire/alien/robot they were fighting and be really excited only to turn around and see that there's, like, a million more of 'em.

    That's pretty much what al Qaeda has been since 9/11, even bin Laden himself. All well and good to kill that first alienzompirebot, but best not to forget all the other ones. al Qaeda is a symptom of the pan-Islamic militant fundamentalism, jihadism, that's been a factor in Islam from day one but has been growing increasingly aggressive over the past few decades.

    I mean, it's... good news, and all, but it's quite troubling if anyone's takeaway from the troubles of our age is "al Qaeda's gone, guess we can relax". Because... turn around.

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