Project Earth: A Resource Based Economy Explained

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by busigator96, Dec 19, 2013.

  1. busigator96
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    busigator96 Moderator

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  2. chemgator
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    chemgator Well-Known Member

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    When international carmakers are allowed to compete on even ground (without the government picking winners and bailing out losers), then planned obsolescence goes away. Planned obsolescence was largely in place during the 1970's and died an ugly death in the 1980's. The Japanese carmakers did not understand planned obsolescence for the most part, and did not participate in the Big Three's prank (read: fraud) on the American people. After Ford lost enough business to Toyota and Honda in the 1980's, they said "Quality is Job 1" (read: "Marketing is Job 1"). When they continued to lose business to the Japanese automakers, they started to actually pay attention to quality. Even GM had some efforts to improve quality, which paid off after their bankruptcy.

    Cars will never last indefintely, because you are talking about something that is used in all kinds of weather, on all kinds of road surfaces, and by all kinds of drivers. It has about 15,000 parts, and is fairly complex. But they are now expected to last 200,000 miles or more, and a few decades ago you were lucky if a car lasted 75,000 miles. I would say that is progress.

    As far as cell phones go, if you are willing to keep your cell phone and take care of it, it will last a while. I've had my current one for 2-3 years, and the previous one for 7 years. Most people ditch their old cell phones not because they are worn out or useless, but because a newer one is out that has features they want.

    I don't know if I agree with your statement that 40% of a home's materials become waste. Most wood waste (that is too small to be used on another job) is buried underneath the front porch (if you have a termite problem, that is the first place they treat).
  3. exiledgator
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    exiledgator Gruntled Premium Member

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    Late to the party.

    I see cradle-to-grave anaylsis/production as the next logical step in addressing scarcity. It can be done within existing market economies by societies (or governments) ceasing to allow the externalization of costs. The details would be quite devilish.

    Of course, an economy that strives for this will suffer in relation to one that does not in the near term, but in time equilibrium or something close to it, may be found.

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