Patric Young---New Position

Discussion in 'Nuttin' but Net' started by bbreece1, Dec 30, 2013.

  1. REM08
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    REM08 Well-Known Member

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    Crossed my mind as well - although I don't agree with it. It certainly wouldn't be a good recruiting pitch.
  2. tampajack1
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    tampajack1 VIP Member

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    Patric is an NBA-level defender right now. He moves his feet very well, and he is as good a help defender on on-ball screens as anyone out there. He should be a solid NBA rebounder. He is a good passer. He busts his ass 100% of the time and appears to be a great teammate. He is a poor free throw shooter and an average to less-than-average low-post scorer. Add it all up and it looks like NBA to me.
  3. tegator80
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    tegator80 Well-Known Member

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    I think what most people miss is what does a person do when a blocker goes low on them. Maybe they are adverse to messing with their legs or don't have the balance to recover quickly. I think unless you have that crazy gene, if you have a choice you go with the NBA, all-star caliber or not.
  4. bbreece1
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    bbreece1 Active Member

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    I NEVER meant to imply that playing in Europe would be a "bad" thing. It would be a wonderful career for 98% of the kids currently playing college basketball in America but when you come out of high school and are seen as a ONE and Done and you are still honing a minimal amount of offensive skills in your senior year that is a disappointment by any stretch of imagination. Boynton will have a GREAT life in Israel, however, he and Brandon Knight were seen as almost "twins" in high school as far as ability. Anybody want to tell me that something strange did not happen on their respective journeys. Now you can say that both Patric and Kenny were overrated but that would raise issues as well. Besides guys who play for Kentucky and leave after a year can you tell me any big men in the SEC last 4 years who could be seen as a yardstick with which to judge career advancement?
  5. your_perfect_enemy
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    your_perfect_enemy Well-Known Member

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    Kenny didn't grow another 5 inches?
  6. jmac83
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    jmac83 Member

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    Based on what I saw his first three years, I envisioned Pat as a possible NBA player but one who probably would have to find his way there through the NBDL or an overseas league. Shortcomings with his shooting, seemingly low hand strength and a penchant for shrinking to the background when the team needed an assertive offensive presence on the block made it hard for me to imagine a team using a draft pick on him.

    Having said that, I think Pat could change opinions for the better in the NBA this year. His motor seems a lot more consistent. He's demanded to be part of the offensive flow and to get his chances to work one-on-one against a defender, which makes the Gators a more dangerous team. Against Savannah State (okay, yeah, it WAS just Savannah State), he even shot a smooth 15-foot jumper from the wing that was a thing of beauty; I thought I was hallucinating. He's making himself look like an offensive factor for which the opponent must game-plan, which wasn't the case in prior years. I think he still takes too long gathering himself with the ball and deciding what direction to cut, and he needs to be quicker with decision-making.
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2014
  7. g8rvet
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    g8rvet Active Member

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    That was not what he was asked to do in BD's system. If he works on that aspect of his game, as he will likely need to in the NBA, it will say nothing of how he was coached at UF. How can anyone think this with the track record of UF players in the pro's and the development of many of these player's games at UF. I guess you can always name the ones that did not advance if you like to see the negative. Of course, you could do the same for every HOF coach in the country, if you were so inclined.
  8. REM08
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    REM08 Well-Known Member

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    Option 1 - Patric has the raw talent and coordination to learn a skill-set that might be required of him in the NBA (like a jumper, etc), but Billy coached him to be as good as possible at the role Billy needed him to play. It may have been exquisite instruction, but in theory, it would mean that skilled Patric needs for the NBA weren't given as high a priority. I mean, hey, Billy is paid by UF to win basketball games at UF, right? Billy chose not to develop him in some of the ways that would benefit him in the NBA.

    Option 2 - Patric has the raw talent and coordination to learn a skill-set that might be required of him in the NBA, but Billy was not effective in developing these skills. Billy chose to develop Patric, but couldn't.

    Option 3 - Patric does not have the raw talent and coordination to learn a skill-set that might be required of him in the NBA (again, like a consistent jumper, etc). Billy assessed what he thought Patric would be effective at doing, recruited him, and tried to develop him in every way that Patric had the aptitude to develop. Billy chose to focus on Patric's strengths and understood his limitations.

    Option 1 and 2 are not good options for recruits to think (and possibly what bbreece was alluding to). I think option 2 is laughable IMO. He would have been exposed long ago were this the case. Overall, I think option 3 is the most accurate.

    Option 1 is interesting though. I don't think this is the case as much as option 3, but it kinda looks like to me that there may be a component of this. I wouldn't view this as a slight though. Ultimately, its every coaches job to do what he thinks will make his program most successful. Helping players down the line (in the NBA preferably) and helping players become more effective for the college team's needs aren't mutually exclusive - but I do think there are instances where a coach has to make a decision on how much "future" stuff they're going to work on. IMO, this is most evident at the shooting guard and power forward positions. How much of their job is to prepare players for the NBA? What about helping them get attention to help their draft stock? The negatively associated term for this would be "showcasing," but it could also mean what they say about a player publicly and privately.

    I don't view either approach as wrong, so long as the coach is honest about this when talking to recruits. I don't care if you're an obvious 1-and-done or a multi-year player, coaches will tell you the most common question they get is what they can do to get the player ready for "the next level."
  9. bbreece1
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    bbreece1 Active Member

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    Thank You for the GREAT thoughts and reasons for them. I am not really a TROLL. I just love good dialogue. I would like to believe I agonize as much over this team as anyone. I just can't bring myself to never question a person based upon stature. Hell, Jefferson, Adams, Churchhill and a few thousand others made mistakes.
  10. Singaporegator
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    Singaporegator Well-Known Member

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    Take four freshman, Noah, Parsons, Horford & Young. At the end of their Freshman year only Horford looked like a good bet for the NBA. Young had an attitude and wasn't committed, Parsons was a role player at best and Noah was a wasted scholarship (at least according to most people on internet boards). Horford is an All Star NBA player, Noah is an All Star NBA player, Parsons will be an All Star NBA Player. They all had the same coach that Patric did. Did they all get better after joining the NBA? Yes certainly, but I would argue that the coaching they got at Florida was a big part of the reason they got better. They were ready for it. I can see Patric doing the same for the same reason.
  11. sixoburn
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    sixoburn Active Member

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    I love Pat, I am happy he stayed 4 years and has been a great gator on and off the court. But is there a reason you guys think he will be a good NBA rebounder?
    Here are rebounds per 40 minutes of past and present gators in their final seasons:
    Pat Young - 9.07 (peaked at 9.6 as a sophomore)
    Marreesse Speights - 13.5
    Joakim Noah - 12.9
    David Lee - 12.85
    Al Horford - 13.66
    Udonis Haslem - 11.85
    Matt Bonner - 7.77 (peaked at 11 as a sophomore)

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