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New Desal Method Could Provide Cheap Plentiful fresh water

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by G8trGr8t, Jul 2, 2013.

  1. G8trGr8t
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    G8trGr8t Premium Member

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    Still in testing stages but I have been watching this for a little while and it appears to be for real. If it can be scaled up, it will change the way coastal populations around the world get drinking water and could provide cheap plentiful water for agriculture within piping distances of coastal areas

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  2. gatorev12
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    gatorev12 Well-Known Member

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    Interesting development, thanks for posting.
  3. Gatorrick22
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    Gatorrick22 Well-Known Member

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    They need to up the voltage. :whistle:

    That's great, I hope they get that up to 99% before some Chinese company tries to steal their patent.
  4. dadx4
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    dadx4 Well-Known Member

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    That is amazing.
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  5. LittleBlueLW
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    LittleBlueLW Premium Member

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    Water will be an issue here in Florida faster than most realize. Competing ag and mining interests, coupled with needs along coastal communities (where salt water intrusion into the aquifer already exists), and continued development is going to be a battle for sure.

    I havent read up on the Desal plant over on Tampa Bay in a while. Is it even online anymore?
  6. icequeen
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    icequeen Well-Known Member

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    Question from a science standpoint - Even if they can't reach the 99% threshold for drinkable water, could they reach a different threshold for safe usage of the water for, say, irrigation systems or other uses of water that would enable the "regular" water to be used for drinking?
  7. Gatorrick22
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    Gatorrick22 Well-Known Member

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    I say use the new method until it gets close, then revert to the reverse osmosis method to finish achieving potable water quality. It's not perfect but it's has to be cheaper and easier than reverse osmosis is from start to finish.
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  8. demosthenes
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    demosthenes Well-Known Member

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    I doubt it. I think that would result in effectively salting the fields. I guess they could always use it for non-drinking purposes but that would require a separately piped system in each home.
  9. icequeen
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    icequeen Well-Known Member

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    See I was thinking for things like construction (cement?) along with that. Would the salt content threshold for the grass/vegetation be the same as for human consumption, though?
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  10. demosthenes
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    demosthenes Well-Known Member

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    I wonder what their results would be if they put 15-17 of these "chips" in series redirecting the salt flow away each time?
  11. Gatoragman
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    Salt levels can be very detramental to agriculture, not sure what the percentage is but anything much over 12-1500 ppm has a very adverse effect on crop production.

    One thing really great about this if they can perfect it, with the climate change and the seas rising we may be able to turn all this extra water into a usefull resource, so we may actually want to see more warming to increase this valued commidity
  12. demosthenes
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    demosthenes Well-Known Member

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    It would be an accumulation over time issue for fields.

    As for construction, you generally can't use saltwater for mixing concrete. There are some exceptions but I also believe it lowers the compressive strength.
  13. icequeen
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    icequeen Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, see I don't know anything about that stuff which was why I had asked. And this is something that we SHOULD be investing in...heavily, whether by private sector or by grants/loans like other countries are doing it, and get it perfected and patented to the point where possibly other countries would be lining up to pay for the same technology, and if nothing else, we create jobs and fresher resources for our own citizens.
  14. Gatoragman
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    Could this be considered green technology?
  15. demosthenes
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    demosthenes Well-Known Member

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    I don't know. It's obviously renewable and could be run with minimal power supplied by solar panels. However, I have to wonder what the effect will be on shoreline and shallow water habitats where high concentrations of salt are released from these systems.
  16. MichaelJoeWilliamson
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    MichaelJoeWilliamson Well-Known Member

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    Seems like a good thing
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  17. GatorBen
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    GatorBen Well-Known Member

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    Because we're at some risk of running out of sea water if not for global warming?

    Look at it this way, the volume of Tampa Bay alone is around 4 billion cubic meters. There are around 264 gallons in a cubic meter. So Tampa Bay alone holds around 1 trillion gallons of water at any one time.

    Thats a massive amount of water, even ignoring the fact that the bay would constantly be refilling both from river inflows and from gulf water coming into the mouth of the bay to replace water that is removed.
  18. brainstorm
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    I find this fascinating.
  19. G8trGr8t
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    brine is usually disposed of through deep well injection or you have to do mixing zone calculations to insure that the brine disperses properly without creating adverse impacts. Of course that is here in the US where we have environmental laws. Hopefully something similar would occur elsewhere or they could possibly dry the brine out and generate salt from it.
  20. demosthenes
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    demosthenes Well-Known Member

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    This obviously complicates the "plug and play" ability of this system (or portability). From what I've read they have a second line at most of these desal plants that draws in seawater and dilutes the brine, probably based on some intense calculations like you stated. Not much different than some waste treatment systems I've seen here at Intel.

    Assuming the technology works you have to believe dealing with the "waste" will be a major issue.

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