NCAA Doesn't Want To Pay Athletes

Discussion in 'RayGator's Swamp Gas' started by gatorchamps0607, Sep 17, 2013.

  1. UF24ou14
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    UF24ou14 Well-Known Member

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    If you aren't going to allow them to have a stipend, then at least allow them to have a job during the offseason. I'm not advocating giving them a blank check, but they should have some way of having some spending money. Hell, if someone gets an academic or music scholarship that covers everything, they aren't prohibited from working as well. Same rule should apply to student-athletes.
  2. atlantagator86
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    atlantagator86 Well-Known Member

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    The problem is that the NCAA doesn't want to open Pandora's Box, which is exactly what I think would happen. I know it doesn't seem fair to the players but if they can be paid even a little, I think it opens up a lot more questions than it solves and could open up the NCAA to all kinds of lawsuits.

    It's a simple to enforce rule that a student athlete is automatically ineligible if they receive money, but if they start paying them, even just a little, it suddenly becomes a grey area that lawyers would take advantage of.

    And I think the most important factor in all of this is that people are thinking too much about what the very small group of superstar athletes deserve, but any rule probably trickles down to every athlete in every college sport at every school in the country. If you pay college football and basketball players, you probably also have to pay athletes from every single sport. Does a golfer or volleyball player really deserve to be paid on top of getting a free education? What about a scholarship player that never even sees the field?

    I have actually been pushing the idea of an NFL farm system for several years. They have development leagues for baseball, basketball and hockey. Seems like they should have it for football too.
  3. REM08
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    REM08 Well-Known Member

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    Sure. That's a great deal for most athletes. However, without question there are athletes playing college sports who are worth FAR FAR more than what you're suggesting they're getting "paid." Meanwhile, schools and the NCAA are making millions upon millions on players that aren't allowed to profit.

    Players have a shelf life. The amount of time they'll be able to make money off of their image/likeness and/or ability to play sports is finite. IMO they shouldn't have some of these years taken away from them because of the sham that is amateurism.

    Schools shouldn't pay players. The NCAA should not undertake something like this either. The only problem it solves (to some degree) is that it provides some travel money for players and their families to either go home or attend more games. It won't prevent players taking money from agents or autograph brokers in the least. The majority of players are lucky to get the expense-free college experience. The injustice is when it comes to players that the market could provide much much more for.

    Let players sell autographs or do commercials. Let them profit off of their future earning potential. Let them major in being a pro athlete if they want. The major universities could easily arrange for this. Give them classes on PR and money management. I know they provide some amount of education for this kind of stuff through the athletic deparments, but make it their major just like an art student majors in art.
  4. atlantagator86
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    atlantagator86 Well-Known Member

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    I don't think football players are prohibited from having jobs, are they?!?! In fact, that how a lot of the athletes have gotten in trouble is because they had jobs that they were getting paid for that they weren't even present for.
  5. UF24ou14
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    UF24ou14 Well-Known Member

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    Athletes on scholarship aren't allowed to work during the school year. The no show jobs were summer jobs.
  6. gator7_5
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    gator7_5 Well-Known Member

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    Boosters aren't looking to break the rules and funnel 10's of thousands of dollars to Violinists for working at a car wash.
  7. atlantagator86
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    atlantagator86 Well-Known Member

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    One more point is that even if the schools paid players say $300 per month, how many of those players will use it for necessities? I'm sure there are a few but I think we all realistically know that that money is going to be spent on designer clothes, video games, jewelry, beer and other non-essentials. Maybe even drugs or steroids.

    Plus, if a player is trying to live a lifestyle, the amount of money the school is going to pay them isn't going to keep them from taking money wherever they can get it. Johnny Manziel doesn't need the money, but that didn't keep him from accepting cash for autographs.

    In my opinion, paying players just isn't going to accomplish much of anything in the grand scheme of things.
  8. gator7_5
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    gator7_5 Well-Known Member

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    Wait, are we supposed to feel sorry for the BEST athletes who will no doubt sign million dollar signing bonuses and not the one's riding the bench?
  9. atlantagator86
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    atlantagator86 Well-Known Member

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    Okay, I guess I misunderstood. when you said ...

    ... I thought you meant Summer jobs. For most college sports, there really isn't an offseason during the school year.
  10. UF24ou14
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    UF24ou14 Well-Known Member

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    That's irrelevant. Boosters that break the rules and want to give athletes thousands of dollars are going to do that regardless of whether the athletes are allegedly working or not. Even after we were on probation in the 80s, I personally witnessed a lady hug a player and stick a hundred dollar bill in his shirt pocket. My dad turned to me and said, "We didn't see that." No telling how much this player received without witnesses around.
  11. gator7_5
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    gator7_5 Well-Known Member

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    I hear ya. But that's cheating. Over paying someone for work is harder to define or punsh at least.
  12. RealDeal
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    RealDeal New Member

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    if they can do that, boosters will be paying them big money for each autograph and commercial
  13. RealDeal
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    RealDeal New Member

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    not all scholarship athletes get a full scholarship. there are ways around title ix if they pay players.
  14. gatorheel
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    gatorheel Premium Member

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    Are colleges ready to pay ALL athletes? All sports? They would have to. So, those who want money, create a minor league, with players straight out of high school, like in baseball, and let athletes choose, after being drafted--between playing before 80,000 fans and 800; being coached by outstanding, experienced college coaches or by NFL rejects; between having outstanding college training facilities and whatever the minor leagues might have to offer; living the campus life or in fleabag motels, eating fast food. And lo and behold, you might even get some education. So stop complaining! If you choose to play college ball do it; but remember, no-one is making anyone do it. I have no sympathy.
  15. MiddleTNgator
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    MiddleTNgator Well-Known Member

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    This. On top of that you have to factor in that very few Athletic Departments even turn a profit. But lets say we decide to pay them and pay all the athletes for every sport a stipend -- then all the future players at major programs will complain they make the same as a non-revenue producing female sport.

    As far as a minor league for football -- it's an NFL rule to be 3 years removed. Remember Maurice Clarett tried to sue his way in and the court upheld the NFL rule. They do not want younger players.
  16. REM08
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    REM08 Well-Known Member

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    Jay Bilas has proposed that there be some form of an approval process that determines what is a legitimate business contract and what is not. He insists it would not be difficult to weed out the contracts that were obvious attempts to get around the essence of the rule.

    I agree this would need polish and doesn't fix everything. But not having the perfect solution doesn't mean the best thing is to do absolutely nothing - when plausible alternatives exist.
  17. REM08
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    REM08 Well-Known Member

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    I'm not asking you to feel sorry for anyone. I just don't think the free market should be, arbitrarily, held at bay for individuals that have tremendous earning potential - especially when that potential is being used to make other people very very wealthy.

    Not every star college athlete that has significant earning potential while they are in college are in store for a lifetime of major professional sports money. Sometimes its that their game/talent/size doesn't translate at the next level, sometimes they suffer a career ending/altering injury.
  18. Swamper
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    Swamper New Member

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    Best solution- the nfl needs to fund a minor league and get real students back on college teams
  19. msa3
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    The kids always have the option of not going to college. Nothing from any league requires college attendance -- it just puts an age limit or a time removed from high school.

    If they are so confident in their abilities, they can sign with an agent, hang around and do drills, play semi pro, whatever, and hope the NFL or NBA notices them. They go to school because the school offers them the chance at notoriety while they are waiting the league-mandated growing-up time. They get plenty from the college in addition to a scholarship -- they get the chance to show what they can do, and if they excel -- and they have what their future employers are looking for -- they can turn that into a payday. If not, they can use their status as a U of Whatever star to open doors in the real world.

    It's not the non-reciprocal relationship it's displayed. People who complain go at it from the idea the kids are being taken advantage of because the only thing they see as valuable is immediate money. It's not that clear-cut.
  20. GatorDoc74
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    There is a reason for all the restrictive rules that apply to scholarship athletes. No jobs during the school year, no stipend, no outside income, etc. The reason is that all these things were OK at one time, but they were so abused by boosters that the NCAA (meaning the member universities) had to put a stop to it to keep the playing field relatively "level" for all schools.

    Spurrier did receive $100 a month in "laundry money" in the 1960's when he was a student-athlete, but I know for a fact that the "laundry money" loophole was abused by boosters. That's why the practice was ended and why it still doesn't exist today. I know because a good friend of mine was a scholarship athlete at Florida at the same time as SOS (he was on a baseball scholarship), and he received lots of extra money from a particular booster in addition to his official "laundry money". If he was ever questioned about how much he was spending, he was told to claim that he had been frugal and had saved up his "laundry money". His mother was also given a nice job at the booster's company, right after he signed with the Gators. If this was going on back then at UF with a baseball player, can you imagine what was happening at Alabama with the football squad, or at Kentucky with the basketball team? Can you make an argument that the same abuses wouldn't happen today if a stipend was given, only with much larger sums of money involved?

    So there was cheating then and there's cheating now. But at least now there are negative consequences if you get caught. Is the answer to eliminate the consequences?

    Pay an athlete for an autograph?. Fine, then T. Boone Pickens or Phil Knight can promise a kid (who just happens to be a 5-star) $10,000-$15,000 for every signature. Do you think the NCAA will be able to review and approve thousands of "contracts" between athletes and boosters (or agents posing as boosters) every year?. How long before a lawyer challenges any contract that the NCAA rejects?

    Paying scholarship athletes may be the right thing to do or the wrong thing to do. There may be a way around Title IX regulations, or there may not be. But one thing is certain. Paying athletes would forever change college football and basketball, much more than any playoff will. Do we really want to radically change the game we have loved all our lives? Be careful what you wish for.

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