Labor Force Drop Outs

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by gatordowneast, Sep 7, 2013.

  1. gatordowneast
    Offline

    gatordowneast Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2007
    Messages:
    11,747
    Likes Received:
    303
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings Received:
    +985
    This is somewhat of a surprise. The real decline in participation rate is not older workers as I would have guessed. Rather it is the 16-24 year old age group as there are not enough entry level opportunities being created and this age group competes against older and more experienced workers for jobs previously grabbed by new college graduates or new high school grads in trades and blue collar type roles.

    Soooo, how do we get the private sector investing, spending to grow?

    Another Bus Trip by Obama? Another Laser like focus on jobs? Or is it policies? Participation rate has been in a very gradual decline since 1990, but really fell out of bed when the real estate bubble burst and has not snapped back. Thoughts?

    http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/the-exchange/real-labor-force-dropouts-175850505.html
  2. northgagator
    Offline

    northgagator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2007
    Messages:
    7,921
    Likes Received:
    86
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Metro Atlanta Ga Gwinnet County
    Ratings Received:
    +120
    I find it odd that the young are not raising a stink about it. But then again in our entitlement society many of the young could be OK with getting by on the gov't handouts and staying at home with mom and dad. Then again maybe their level of expectations is lower then that of prior generations.

    This is really sad because the younger worker is our future. They need the opportunity to earn a pay check and to make a career. In ten to fifteen years we are going to need a large percentage of the young to be paying their share into the IRS so the out gov't can provide Obama Care, Social Security, and security to our homes and country.
  3. tegator80
    Offline

    tegator80 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    Messages:
    5,606
    Likes Received:
    985
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    Ratings Received:
    +2,305
    My take: the economy is in a perpetual state of being in neutral. Other than the Fed printing money and raising the stock market, the real economy isn't doing anything or shows the need for moving forward. So if you are in, you stay in. If you are out, there isn't any growth to accommodate the young. They are supposed to take the jobs that the more experienced ones vacate and move into better ones. It reminds me of the fairly recent (20 years or so) perception of airline attendants. They used to be young but many more are older types, because they aren't moving on.
  4. JerseyGator01
    Online

    JerseyGator01 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2007
    Messages:
    15,194
    Likes Received:
    139
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ratings Received:
    +627
    I bet a lot of these people are college grads who fell for the brainwashing effect of believing that all degrees are created equal. I'd want my money back from our bloated universities if I were them. Unless you're the son or daughter of a glorified government bureaucrats, poli sci degrees can only go so far.
  5. rivergator
    Online

    rivergator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    31,960
    Likes Received:
    382
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings Received:
    +1,872
    actually, at least for those 25 and older, college grads have a significantly higher employment rate than non-grads.
  6. oldgator
    Offline

    oldgator Premium Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2007
    Messages:
    13,605
    Likes Received:
    138
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ratings Received:
    +139
    not much of a surprise. Consider the recent thread dealing with adult children still living at home. Much of the 16-24 year old age group lacks not just the tools of self sufficiency, etc. They also lack the mindset to compete. Especially those who are already unemployed and enter the labor force.

    Also might look into the setting/conditions/administration in which the current 16-24 year olds were in their formative years(as in under 15 years of age).
  7. JerseyGator01
    Online

    JerseyGator01 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2007
    Messages:
    15,194
    Likes Received:
    139
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ratings Received:
    +627
    Kids with college degrees are now working retail jobs and waiting tables. Nice.
  8. philnotfil
    Offline

    philnotfil Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    12,561
    Likes Received:
    157
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ratings Received:
    +556
    What happens when we have more people than we have jobs that need doing?
  9. rivergator
    Online

    rivergator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    31,960
    Likes Received:
    382
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings Received:
    +1,872
    you have not a clue. you tried to claim they're the ones not working but you really didn't know that at all. when it turns out that college grads are working at a much higher rate than anyone else, you stammer to find another thing to complain about ...
    not a clue.
  10. gatordowneast
    Offline

    gatordowneast Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2007
    Messages:
    11,747
    Likes Received:
    303
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings Received:
    +985
    River, you are incorrect. Even though kids with college degrees are working at a higher %, you need to get out more. There are tons of kids in the 22-25 year old age range who are "under employed". They are not counted in the unemployment ranks but also can't make enough waiting tables or working in a call center to start their own household.
  11. rivergator
    Online

    rivergator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    31,960
    Likes Received:
    382
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings Received:
    +1,872
    the issue is labor force participation, right? I mean, that's what you started the thread about.
  12. northgagator
    Offline

    northgagator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2007
    Messages:
    7,921
    Likes Received:
    86
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Metro Atlanta Ga Gwinnet County
    Ratings Received:
    +120
    Have you ever considered that being under employed means that you are not a full time participant in the work force?
  13. gatordowneast
    Offline

    gatordowneast Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2007
    Messages:
    11,747
    Likes Received:
    303
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings Received:
    +985
    My comment was in reference to your comment admonishing jersey. You said he didn't have a clue. I doubt you have a clue. If you get out at all, you see and hear tons of stories about recent grads driving Rental Car busses, working at Dillards part time or Panera Bread full time...with degrees. Now maybe they are FSU grads....but

    The thread is about work force participation. Why wouldn't a comment about "underemployment" be applicable? My guess is that if Bush were president of such an anemic economy you lefty libbies would be getting flagged for piling on daily.
  14. rivergator
    Online

    rivergator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    31,960
    Likes Received:
    382
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings Received:
    +1,872
    He claimed that a lot of those not in the work force were college grads. (Apparently, he doesn't like college.) The fact is that he's wrong. College grads are in the work force at a far higher rate than non-college grads. That's a fact.


    Work force participation and underemployment are two different subjects. You offered some very interesting stats about participation.
  15. corpgator
    Offline

    corpgator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2010
    Messages:
    6,319
    Likes Received:
    164
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ratings Received:
    +792
    That is the question of course. When everything is automated, those who earn the automations will live like kings and the rest will fight over the scraps. Better hope your kids invent something.
  16. ncgatr1
    Online

    ncgatr1 Premium Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2007
    Messages:
    5,076
    Likes Received:
    184
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ratings Received:
    +686
    I think this is very concerning, sooner or later there will be some kind of labor flight in this Country and the quality and availability of jobs will definitely impact American lives. It's too bad people don't see the big picture and the impact it will have on their children.
  17. docspor
    Offline

    docspor Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2010
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    29
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Ratings Received:
    +57
    bunch of damn protectionists!

    p.s. I sound like MOTORHEAD!
  18. philnotfil
    Offline

    philnotfil Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    12,561
    Likes Received:
    157
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ratings Received:
    +556
    Globalization, everyone moves towards the mean, and we are way above the mean. Bad times for us. Even if we dropped our taxes to zero, the cost of living would still make our wages uncompetitive on a global market.

    If the US was a company we could just downsize and let some people go, but how do you do that with a country?

Share This Page