Kerwin Bell In?

Discussion in 'RayGator's Swamp Gas' started by diehardgator1, Dec 1, 2013.

  1. diehardgator1
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    diehardgator1 Well-Known Member

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    I thank Kerwin started out at UF as a 8th string walk on. QB kept getting hurt and dropping like flies. He was promoted to starting QB our first game against Miami after being red shirted is first year good write up on him

    "
    After graduating from high school, Bell attended the University of Florida in Gainesville, Florida, where he played quarterback for the Florida Gators football team under coach Galen Hall from 1983 to 1987.[3] Bell did not initially receive an athletic scholarship, but was a walk-on player who was initially the eighth quarterback on the Gators' depth chart.[4] He saw no playing time as a freshman in 1983, and was redshirted by the coaching staff.

    Bell received his chance to become the Gators' starting quarterback when all of the scholarship quarterbacks ahead of him transferred or were injured prior to the start of the 1984 season, and finally became the primary signal caller when starter Dale Dorminey suffered a serious knee injury in practice just four days before the season opener against the defending national champion Miami Hurricanes.[5] Behind the Gators' outstanding offensive line, memorably dubbed "The Great Wall of Florida," and which included Phil Bromley, Lomas Brown, Billy Hinson, Crawford Ker and Jeff Zimmerman, and supported by fullback John L. Williams, halfback Neal Anderson and wide receiver Ricky Nattiel, Bell made the most of his opportunity and led the Gators to a 9–1–1 seasons in 1984, an SEC championship, and a top-5 national ranking. However, due to NCAA infractions committed under coach Charley Pell, the Gators' were ineligible for bowl consideration and their SEC championship was vacated months later. In 1985, now with a full scholarship, Bell led the Gators to a second consecutive 9-1-1 record. The Gators also finished with best-in-the-conference records of 5–0–1 and 5–1 in 1984 and 1985 and held their first ever #1 ranking in the AP poll during the season.[6] Due to mainly to the effects of ongoing NCAA probations, the Gators' record slipped to 6-5 in 1986 and 6-6 in 1987, Bell's junior and senior seasons. A highlight of those campaigns was Florida's upset of the #5 and undefeated Auburn Tigers in November 1986. Bell had injured his knee a month prior and did not start the game. But with the Gators trailing 17-0 in the 4th quarter, he entered the contest wearing a large knee brace and led his team to a dramatic 18-17 comeback win, capped with a last-minute TD pass to Ricky Nattiel followed by Bell himself "hobbling" into the endzone for a successful 2-point conversion.[7]
    Bell was the Southeastern Conference (SEC) Player of the Year in 1984, an honorable mention All-American in 1985 and 1986, a first-team All-SEC selection in 1985, and the recipient of the Gators' Fergie Ferguson Award and a team captain in 1987.[3] He finished his four-year college career with 549 completions on 949 passing attempts, for 7,585 yards and fifty-six touchdowns.[3]

    Bell graduated from Florida with a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1987, and was inducted into the University of Florida Athletic Hall of Fame as a "Gator Great" in 1997.[4][8] Among the top 100 Gators of the first 100 years of Florida football, the sportswriters of The Gainesville Sun ranked him the No. 26 greatest Gator of all time in 2006.[9]


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerwin_Bell
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  2. chompchomp01
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    chompchomp01 New Member

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    I just looked up an interesting stat. Ju offense had 21 first downs and 401 total yards against Jacksonville State. 2013 team (10-3) Uf had 18 first downs and 356 yards against Jacksonville State. 2012 team (6-5)
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  3. Wormwood56
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    C'mon, rserina, you know the rules. Any head coach who is not beloved here ALWAYS micromanages his coordinators. Remember Charlie Strong, the potted plant and DC in Name Only during the Zook years? Has Spurrier EVER been accused of micromanaging Hoke, or Meyer micromanaging Mullen, Addazio or Strong?

    No.
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  4. Wormwood56
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    Wormwood56 VIP Member

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    Of course, it helps when:

    * Your QB plays behind the best offensive line in school history, anchored by Lomas Brown (1st round), who was a 7-time Pro Bowler, Jeff Zimmerman (3d round), and Crawford Kerr (3d round);

    * Hands off the ball to the likes of John L. Williams (1st round), Neal Anderson (1st round), and Lorenzo Hampton (1st round), all of whom were not only drafted, but were all very successful in the NFL;

    * Throw the ball (when you needed to ) to Rickey Nattiel (1st round).

    And all were healthy.
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  5. 3xchump
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    3xchump Member

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    You forgot the most important stat, TOP:

    JU 32:51

    UF 29:24
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  6. 12footer
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    KB isn't coming to Florida. I don't see WM turning over the keys to his OC. KB was passed over before and he is too smart to throw away his career on this dumpster fire. Whoever comes in will demand a high price, because it may be awhile before they coach again.
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  7. ufgator4ever
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    Exactly. Any assistants coming aboard better be great swimmers.
  8. G8RNTN
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    G8RNTN VIP Member

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    Hahaha these thread starters...
  9. tegator80
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    tegator80 Well-Known Member

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    Sad, funny, but ultimately true. If a good one lands in our lap and brings in an OLine coach that he can communicate with then we should thank our lucky stars. Muschamp is more likely going to go after someone with whom he has a strong relationship with and not one with a flashy rep (see Galen Hall and Lyn Amedee).

    And as I posted on another thread, if the hire is "out there" and splashy then I see Foley's fingerprints all over it and he is taking over the reins of the program. And Muschamp goes back to HC-in-waiting and head of recruiting. JMHO
  10. OaktownGator
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    I don't see the basis for this opinion. His first OC was Weiss. Wasn't anyone he had a strong relationship with and definitely had a big rep as an OC. I don't recall where Pease had a prior relationship with Muschamp either.

    Those hires did not work, and Muschamp has responsibility for that. But it had nothing to do with him hiring buddies or avoiding guys with a strong rep as OCs.
  11. tegator80
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    tegator80 Well-Known Member

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    I'm mot talking about history, I am talking about a "zero tolerance, one final year audition" scenario. Why would he want to take a chance on an unproven relationship? Isn't that called "three strikes?" I just don't see it unless it is forced on him by Foley.
  12. Wormwood56
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    Foley has considerable influence on who a head coach hires as an assistant. Muschamp's livelihood is on the line here. If he goes with a "strong personal relationship" instead of hiring a strong, proven OC, he is asking to get fired.
  13. tegator80
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    tegator80 Well-Known Member

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    As opposed to what? He is between a rock and a hard place and there is no good way out. As I have posted before, it is going to take a minor miracle to keep him gainfully employed at UF after the 2014 season. So, he can swing for the fences and get "Lynn Amedee" or he can get someone with whom he feels has his back. And you can't believe that unless you have a relationship with them. That means succeeding or failing on his terms and not someone else's.
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2013
  14. OaktownGator
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    I understand what you're saying now.

    If the relationship is with someone with a strong track record as an OC, then I agree he is likely to go that way. But he has to get an effective OC who can make something happen this year, or Champ is out of work at UF. For the new OC, a track record of success moving the ball and scoring the ball, including quick implementation of his system is going to be the main criteria. I think.
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  15. msa3
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    Worm, you've got the paradigm backward. They get the pass -- they are beloved -- on games they should have won, on micromanaging, one whatever, because they've been successful. They had a track record that showed mistakes -- whatever they were -- were a blip, not a tendency. SOS probably got the benefit of the doubt in year one because he was a past Gator, but most of the adoration you seem, well, contemptuous of, came from the performance of the team, not just because. All coaches have bad games -- even great ones, and fans are usually understanding of that if there is a track record. They are much less so if it seems to be a pattern.

    You can argue that WM doesn't have such a pattern, but I think you'd have to admit there is reason for others to think that he does.
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  16. Wormwood56
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    Wormwood56 VIP Member

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    I've been here since the late 1990s, and there is no more consistent a pattern than this. Great coaches always get a pass, and because blame has to be assigned for a loss, it is usually deflected to either a coordinator or a player. It doesn't MATTER if it makes sense or not.

    All coaches have influence on how their coordinators do their jobs. Spurrier influenced his DCs, Meyer his OCs and DCs, Zook and Muschamp the same.

    The DIFFERENCE is that when the great coaches lose, it is always someone ELSE's fault. This odious double standard been a root issue for me for nearly two decades. If Meyer gets the credit for two Natties, then he shoulders the responsibility for that 8-5 season and leaving a train wreck for his successor.

    Fans are human. They love their heroes and hate their goats. But if there is one thing you can take to the bank, fans MUST assign blame for losses (or even poor wins). And when the head coach is beloved, he can do no wrong. If the head coach is despised, he is to blame for EVERYTHING.
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  17. tegator80
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    tegator80 Well-Known Member

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    I would take it one step off this. IMO, fans are vested in their "heroes" and want them to do well (see Tim Tebow) whereas they also are against those they feel are adversarial (see Tim Tebow bashers). Everything that happens is rationalized based on their beliefs of who that person is to them. I personally don't hold grudges against a former Dawg - remember Vince Dooley was an Auburn graduate and Pat Dye was a UGa graduate - but once the ball rolls in a certain direction it is damn hard to stem the tide.
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  18. Wormwood56
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    Excellent analysis. My problem is that as an historian, I put aside the notions of heroes and goats, and look at what happened, using the exact same criteria. There are many figures I admire, but still force myself to look at the figures objectively. I absolutely hate double standards, because it is dishonest.
  19. RealtyGator
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    Gus Malzahn went from being a high school head coach to being OC at Arkansas. Now granted, that was probably to get Mustain to commit to Arky, but still, is it totally beyond the realm of possibility that Bell could make the same leap? Bell has more of a resume than Malzahn did at that point...
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  20. Hebron13
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    I get there is hardly a chance for KB, but as far as understanding football, offense, the QB position, someone that played the position of QB would make sense. KB not only played at a high level but has been around great minds. Your analogy makes no sense...KB achieved a lot in football....may have overachieved based on raw talent. It would make more sense to say ford hired a CEO that owned a dealership in a small town that produced crazy sales, had a great model, and was respected by his community / customers....just hasn't been in the big city competing with the sharks....any KB detractor I say this.....why wouldn't you want KB to get a shot. Most of the names thrown around nobody has heard of other than they have been somewhat successful at a high level of coaching. But when you add KBs on field experiences at QB and who he learned from, it makes it a wash. Then you add he gets the culture, it's a job that he wants not looking for next big thing, can deal with the UF pressure, etc. he at least is on the same playing field. Do you really think that these other names have any. Ore chance at succeeding as KB? I don't.
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