John Boehner is the leader of House Republicans. Remember?

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by gator996, Aug 24, 2013.

  1. gator996
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    gator996 New Member

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    Many here cry & whine about the POTUS and leadership...

    What is their assessment of Boehner?
    Or McConnell?
    Cantor?


    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2013/07/22/the-morning-plum-john-boehner-is-the-leader-of-house-republicans-remember/
    The Morning Plum: John Boehner is the leader of House Republicans. Remember?
    By Greg Sargent, Published: July 22 at 9:19 amE-mail the writer


    John Boehner’s appearance on Face the Nation yesterday continues to get attention over the Speaker’s claim that House Republicans “should not be judged by how many new laws we create,” but rather by “how many laws we repeal.” And that is useful confirmation of the true nature of the “post policy” posture of today’s GOP.

    But the more interesting thing in the interview with Boehner was that host Bob Schieffer pressed Boehner directly on a fact that too many commentators continue to ignore: The House Speaker is in control of whether immigration reform happens or whether it dies. And in the exchange, Boehner actually seemed to suggest he is not in control over what gets a vote in the end.

    Asked repeatedly by Schieffer if he would allow a bill to come to a vote that provides a path to citizenship, Boehner hemmed and hawed a bit, but finally replied:


    “This is about bringing these bills out here in a commonsense way. And I’m not going to predict what’s going to be on the floor and what isn’t going to be on the floor. Now that’s what you’re asking me to do. I can’t do that, and I don’t want to do that. My job in this process is to facilitate a discussion, and to facilitate a process so the American people can see what we’re doing and so the members understand that we’re dealing with this in a deliberative way.”

    Yes, “facilitating discussion” is part of the Speaker’s job. But so is deciding what gets a vote and what doesn’t. So is leading.

    In one sense it would be premature for Boehner to commit right now to supporting citizenship — which he also declined to do in the interview — or to allowing a vote on a final package with citizenship in it. But this exchange is nonetheless key, because it gets to the crux of why it’s actually helpful to Boehner for reporters and commentators — some of them liberals — to continue predicting there is no way immigration reform can ever pass, given how crazy those rank and file House conservatives are.

    After the August recess, a bipartisan “gang of seven” proposal will likely be introduced in the House that includes a path to citizenship but with onerous provisions that put it significantly to the right of the Senate bill. What happens to this plan will be partly determined by Boehner and Paul Ryan, who is widely being seen as a pivotal player in the House on immigration. Does it get a vote? Does it get shoved into a committee process that shreds it? Do Boehner and Ryan get behind the plan — tacitly or overtly? Do they show leadership and take a bit of heat from the right in exchange for asking their rank and file to consider supporting a solution to a glaring national problem (remember, Boehner and other GOP leaders have explicitly said the system is broken and that we must act) that has plenty for both sides to dislike? What if House Republicans pass a few bills without citizenship, and conference negotiations produce something with citizenship that a majority of House Republicans can’t quite vote for — but that many Republicans can privately accept allowing to the floor? Does Boehner really nix a vote in that case?

    Boehner wants you to believe immigration reform is all in the hands of his conference, that it’s a really tough or even impossible lift for many Republicans to support it, and that reform is likely dead as a result. Don’t believe me on this. Jon Ward, who is very well connected with the GOP leadership, reported recently that this is exactly the view GOP leaders want to take hold, because “a slow and unsurprising failure is far better, politically, than an unexpected one,” and because “the perception that the bill is nearly dead could strengthen Boehner’s hand in negotiations with Democrats and the White House.” Is supporting reform all that hard for the GOP leadership or for rank and file House Republicans? Boehner wants you to think that. But Ward — who, again, knows the House GOP caucus — suggests it remains unclear whether even the path to citizenship is dead among a majority of House Republicans, given that conditions remain in flux.

    Predictions that immigration reform is dead help Boehner by removing the focus from the fact that in reality, he remains in control of whether it is dies or not. But as Schieffer put it bluntly during yesterday’s interview with the Speaker: “you’re the leader of the Republicans.” Good that somebody notices.
  2. gatordowneast
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    gatordowneast Premium Member

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    996, I have stated numerous times that the Pubs need a makeover of national leadership in the House and Senate. Boehner and McConnell are 10 times more competent than little Harry Reid or Nancy Pelosi, but neither is charismatic, nor is Cantor and we need younger, more energetic leadership. Frankly, it is time for a change out.

    That said, I'm appreciative that these men have kept Obama bottled up from further destruction. His initial legislative efforts of a $780 B payback to unions he labeled as "stimulus" and ACA that has had businesses scrambling for 3 years have both been a waste of time, borrowed funds and have been destructive to the economy. So we owe both leaders thanks, and attaboys but it is time for both to step aside following the mid terms.
  3. gator996
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    gator996 New Member

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    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/plum-line/wp/2013/07/26/the-morning-plum-even-republicans-are-openly-worried-about-gops-sabotage-governing/

    The Morning Plum: Even Republicans are openly worried about GOP’s sabotage governing
    By Greg Sargent, Published: July 26 at 8:57 am


    The notion that GOP sabotage governing tactics could ultimately prove counter-productive and self defeating for the Republican Party is now being increasingly voiced by Republicans themselves.

    They don’t call it “sabotage governing,” of course. But with Republicans hurtling towards another set of crises over the debt limit and funding the government — with the Quixotic quest to defund Obamacare at the center of the headlong rush forward — they are openly nervous about the GOP’s continued embrace of its intransigent scorched earth governing posture. A couple even suggest Republicans are flirting with an outcome that could cost Republicans the House in 2014.

    Here’s GOP Rep. Tom Cole, an ally of the GOP leadership:


    “The only two things that really risk the Republican majority in 2014 would be if we shut down the government or if we defaulted on the debt.”

    Here’s Brock McCleary, a GOP pollster and former deputy executive director of the NRCC, which is in charge of winning House races for Republicans:


    “If you ask me what is the one thing that could reshuffle the deck on an otherwise stable mid-term environment in 2014, the answer is a government shutdown. Convincing voters that the other side is to blame would become a game of high-stakes politics.”

    Here’s GOP Senator Richard Burr:


    “Defunding the Affordable Care Act is not achievable by shutting down the federal government. At some point, you’re going to open the federal government back up, and Barack Obama is going to be president.”

    This comes after GOP Senator Roy Blunt declared that the GOP drive to hold the debt limit hostage over Obamacare was a bad idea, and after Senator John McCain said the American people would not stand for another round of GOP debt limit and Obamacare “shenanigans.”

    I don’t really place much stock in the idea that even the worst outcome could cost Republicans the House. But the rising worries among Republicans are noteworthy, because they suggest a growing recognition on their part that the GOP’s basic governing posture — one long embraced and encouraged by the leadership itself — is not tenable over the long term. This, for instance, is instructive:


    Republican leaders are growing concerned by the fervor with which some members are demanding that Boehner defund the health care law as part of the government funding talks.

    Pass the hanky! Republican leaders who have fed the GOP base’s repeal fantasies for literally years — for deeply cynical purposes — are now concerned that Tea Party lawmakers actually take the prospects for repeal seriously!

    However deep this schism really proves in practice, the concerns being publicly voiced by Republicans could matter for this fall’s showdowns in another way. More public disunity from Republicans about their tactics — even as Dems remain relatively united behind their insistence that they won’t negotiate over the debt limit and will continue to demand new revenues as part of any budget deal — will only encourage the White House to hold a harder line.


    * KEEP AN EYE ON GEORGIA: Another interesting tidbit from the above story on House Republicans insisting on defunding Obamacare:


    Three Georgia GOP Senate candidates — Reps. Jack Kingston, Phil Gingrey and Paul Broun — signed on.

    Dems hope Republicans will nominate an ultra-conservative Senate candidate in Georgia, which is emerging as something of a firewall for them: If Dems can somehow win there, Republicans need to knock off four Dem incumbents to take back the Senate.
  4. gatordowneast
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    gatordowneast Premium Member

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    996, if I were you on the left, I would be worried about my own situation. Pubs control 30 states governorships as well as state senates and representatives. With zerocare looming and the predicted disaster of implementation, I would suspect voters will be none to happy with legislators that crammed that baby down our throats. BTW- it received no pub votes.

    Which means, that GOP has a good chance of capturing the Senate sending little Harry Reid back into the minority. And the House looks very secure with pubs picking up some seats.

    Therefor Obama's socialist agenda will be dead. Thank God.
  5. gator996
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    gator996 New Member

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    So the political hopes of the GOP rest on the implementation of the ACA?

    Then why does the GOP desire to defund it if its going to be the huge disaster conservatives predict?

    Its because the GOP knows your scenario isn't very likely and they have to make this defund or shutdown argument.

    The fear of voter backlash for shutting down the government is a much more probable event to actually happen.


    Boehner has already told his caucus that he's going to "kick the can down the road" with another continuing resolution (nice leadership)....

    How's that going to go over with party's pure and faithful?
  6. g8orbill
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    g8orbill Gators VIP Member

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    unfortunately Boehner is a puss
  7. gator996
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    gator996 New Member

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    Perfect response bil....

    Go tell gatordowneast that pubs & conservatives don't play nice with each other anymore

    :grin:
  8. baygator1
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    baygator1 Well-Known Member

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    +1

    He, McConnell and McCain are symbols of establishment rot and decay.
  9. gatordowneast
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    gatordowneast Premium Member

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    996, you are a student, right? So how is anything that we are speaking about, going to affect your daily life? Other then the huge deficits your generation will be handed? Now it will affect your parents or whoever is toting the note for you to attend school.
  10. rpmGator
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    rpmGator Well-Known Member

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    Problem with the party is, the focus in only on the party, not solving problems.

    Putting party before country is not something to be proud of.

    The Tea Party guy who ran for office in my hometown wanted to stop all spending. We were building a farmers market and interactive water playground for kids. He thought the million bucks was too much.

    Instead it has brought in so many people, our market won best middle sized farmers market in the nation. The local business is booming, and our TP idiot came in third of three in the election.

    Now our problem is where to park everyone...
  11. g8orbill
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    g8orbill Gators VIP Member

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    996 is a grown man who says at one time he was a conservative-he is a successful businessman too

    996- I am a registered independent and it is because of the moderate pubs like Boehner, McCain and McConnel-who lack the intestinal fortitude to challenge the dems
  12. gator996
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    gator996 New Member

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    I understand bil....

    Just trying to show gatordowneast that his vision of a unified pub party is far from reality.

    Is government shutdown a worthwhile litmus test in your opinion?

    Would you vote McConnell out if he blinked?
  13. rpmGator
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    rpmGator Well-Known Member

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    If you aren't in the party, stop complaining about who wins in the primary.
  14. gator996
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    gator996 New Member

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    Truly enlightened viewpoint :wink:
  15. g8tr80
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    What do you want these guys to do? Punch Harry in the nose?

    It cannot be repeated enough. Whatever is raised in the House goes to die in the Senate. Harry Reid is the Obama enabler. Obama gets away with doing all he has done because of Harry Reid. Win the Senate and you seize the day.
  16. MichiGator2002
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    MichiGator2002 VIP Member

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    The RNC doesn't want to win the Senate as badly as they want to maintain the status quo of the Beltway political class, which is why when the party hierarchy doesn't the candidates they want, the people that they owe favors and whose "turn" it is, they give up on that seat and then blame the nominee. Like the machines in "The Matrix", there are levels of survival they are prepared to accept.
  17. gator996
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    gator996 New Member

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    What exactly has the house raised?

    Boehner gets shot down by his "own" caucus on just about everything...
  18. g8tr80
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    g8tr80 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, the RNC like the DNC are all about survival. But your view is a bit jaded to think the republicans don't want a return to power. Imagine if you give Paul or Cruz the bully pulpit AND the majority vote? It's a game changer of course. They are driven by power. They all are. Will they accept less? Yeah, if they have to.

    In the mean time, you are correct. The RNC is just trying to survive.but it has been a very long 5 going on 6 years.
  19. MichiGator2002
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    The RNC, the leadership, would rather be a collegial minority than a majority that doesn't get invited to the right parties. I believe that fully.
  20. vangator1
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    vangator1 Well-Known Member

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    You have to stop reading the Washington Post. That could explain a few of your wacky positions.

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