Have a great idea for a penalty kick goalie specialist

Discussion in 'Nuttin' but Net' started by oneatatime, Jul 5, 2014.

  1. GatorLurker
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    GatorLurker Well-Known Member

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    All you say is true, but I would rather have Tim in goal.
  2. OaktownGator
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    OaktownGator Well-Known Member

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    Nice call. Would also be great starting the offense.
  3. gottapanda
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    gottapanda Active Member

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    But he's seen PLENTY of pro soccer games in person! Can't you see how ridiculous it is to suggest that a huge, exceptionally athletic person might be able to play well in another sport at a position where size and athleticism are highly valued? How silly you are, sir. And on an internet message board! I've never seen such nonsense.
  4. oneatatime
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    oneatatime Well-Known Member

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    All sports are breaking new ground when it comes to crossovers. Remember Jan Stenerud and the Gogolak brothers? Now we have some rugby players in the NFL. This is all about specialization.

    I am not saying that any of these guys could be a full time World class goalie, but to stop penalty kicks, which only features one aspect of the offensive player's skillset, I think should be an idea worth mulling over.
  5. demosthenes
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    demosthenes Well-Known Member

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    The problem is that you get three substitutions per game. You only get to a shootout after playing thirty additional minutes. The chances of a team still having a substitution are very small at that point. In fact, in all the years I've watched soccer I've never seen a team sub its number one keeper for a shootout.
  6. gatormater
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    gatormater Premium Member

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    I like these debates because you see how defensive soccer afficianados can get about the argument that the US would be an elite soccer team if we had our elite athletes playing the sport (especially if you're arguing with non-Americans).

    Sorry, there's just no way you can tell me that a complete freak athlete like Russell Westbrook would not dominate in soccer if he decided to play that sport and trained in that sport instead of basketball.

    Lebron as a goalie would be an absolute beast (he could probably be a beast at most other positions). I do see the argument that extremely tall athletes may not excel in soccer BUT the US also has the market cornered on tall athletes that are super athletic (and we haven't even talked about NFL players that are not tall but super fast/strong). They just don't play soccer.

    The only problem with having a sub as a bball/tall player is that player probably would not want to do it if they're serious about their primary sport. It'd be a major opportunity cost. They'd still have to dedicate months of training toward goalkeep play and I doubt someone like Anthony Davis, etc. or even a player who's sniffing at the NBA would ever do that.
  7. Osiris_DPM
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    Percy
  8. Bradass
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    Damarcus Beasley is listed at 5'8, 146 lbs. Guys like Chris Rainey come to mind...guys with all kinds of foot speed, quickness, and creativity in space, but who don't have the durability to compete in the NFL long term. Guys like that would definitely improve the quality of U.S. Soccer if they chose soccer and started training at an early age
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. demosthenes
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    demosthenes Well-Known Member

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    Actually, I disagree that one who excels at basketball (or football) is guaranteed to be great at soccer if they train for it from a young age. Soccer, like every other sport has certain skill sets which one can excel at. Certain physical characteristics are also beneficial. In soccer, too much height and body mass hurts (helpful to an extent). Certain players have field vision, quickness of feet, and foot coordination which is beneficial.

    Everyone has seen the can't miss recruit with every physical characteristic become a bust. Everyone has seen the three star athlete become an NFL pro bowler. We also see players that don't have the right skills within sports excel at other positions. The DB that can't play WR. The SG without the court vision or passing ability, etc.

    I agree that a larger talent base will be beneficial to US Soccer. I think we could definitely pull players from other sports to raise the talent level. Yes, I'd love to see what a Russell Westbrook could do but I disagree he would definitely be a success. He could very well be "nothing special" like Kobe Bryant said about himself after growing up playing soccer every day.
  10. keefer
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    Why dont we find a 600lb guy and put him in front of the net in hockey while we're at it? I'm sure they've never thought of that either.
  11. OaktownGator
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    OaktownGator Well-Known Member

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    I bet some of those sumo guys would be great at it.

    Handy to have around during the bench clearing brawls, too. ;)
    • Funny Funny x 1
  12. oneatatime
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    oneatatime Well-Known Member

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    he has that really quick first step, but given his history, who knows what the result of his first header would be.
  13. GCNumber7
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    lol at Lebron excelling at most soccer positions. You turn the AC up a few degrees and he starts cramping. Can you imagine him running non stop for 90 min in Manaos with only one break?

    Just take a look at the Neymar's, Pele's, Maradona's and Messi's of the world. Not exactly physically huge. There's a reason for that. But sure, let's throw our 'big athletes' at it and I'm sure we'll win the next World Cup. :)
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2014
  14. gatormater
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    You missed the point. Lebron has been training to play basketball ever since he was born. So of course, he's built to play in basketball conditions, sprints with lots of time outs mixed with lots of physical play. He's also one of the most athletic specimens in our lifetime. The fact that he can move the way he does with the amount of muscle/weight on him is nearly unprecedented.

    You're telling me if he trained for endurance+physical, he wouldn't be a great soccer player?

    Doubt it brah.
  15. oneatatime
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    oneatatime Well-Known Member

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    Thank goodness the final didn't end in a shootout, especially when Argentina would have been in their second without having to score a goal.

    I don't know how often they resort to the extra 30 minutes besides World Cup, but why not allow an extra sub during that time, a ratio in line with 3 subs over the first 90 minutes.
  16. demosthenes
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    demosthenes Well-Known Member

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    Again, being a physical specimen doesn't guarantee a damn thing other than you're a physical specimen.
  17. GCNumber7
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    Yes, that's exactly what I'm telling you. Lebron is all fast twitch. Athletes like him are great at certain types of sports, but suffer in endurance sports. Look at track and swimming and compare the body types of sprinters vs. long distance. Very different.

    You are making the incorrect assumption that 'great athletes' would be great at any sport. That might be the case at the high school level but not at the world class level. It's true that great athletes tend to posses characteristics that translate well to many sports: speed, strength, coordination... but at the ultra elite levels, these guys are so specialized that strengths and weaknesses are greatly magnified.

    My point is, we don't need the Lebron's or Harvin's playing soccer. What we need is to identify soccer talent very early on and provide those kids with an environment to maximize their skills. If we can do that, I have little doubt we will discover the next Messi or Ronaldo right here.
  18. OaktownGator
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    Certainly, soccer talent is being identified and developed in the US right now.

    But soccer is still not a sport that is embraced by many in AA communities. Athletes like Percy would be elite if they grew up with the sport.
  19. demosthenes
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    demosthenes Well-Known Member

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    He'd get a concussion the first time he headed the ball. :cool:

    All jokes aside, we need more players like Percy in the talent pool. Athletes like Percy could be elite but there's no guarantee a specific player would be elite based on their measurables.
  20. OaktownGator
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    I'd say that's true in any sport if you're just looking at measurables. I look at athletes a lot deeper than that, though.

    For instance, our new TE McGee is not a real fast guy - certainly no 4.6 guy as was claimed. But he's an athlete. Great awareness, body control, timing and coordination. I will be surprised if he doesn't do very well for us.

    Of course those attributes Percy also has, in addition to explosive change of direction, acceleration and top end speed. And a hard worker and quick study.

    Percy would be elite in soccer if that's what he grew up playing.

    Except for the header thing. ;)

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