College students answer Common core math question

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by g8orbill, May 15, 2014.

  1. philnotfil
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    philnotfil Well-Known Member

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    The method of subtraction in the video is not required by common core.

    The method of subtraction in the video predates common core.

    Common core doesn't mandate that only one method of subtraction be taught.

    Common core encourages teaching several different methods of subtraction and making sure that students know when to use which one.

    You can read more here:
    corestandards.org

    There are valid concerns with common core, particularly the K-3 standards, but, unfortunately, very little of what gets brought up when discussing common core is actually related to common core. For example, this entire thread.
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  2. chemgator
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    chemgator Well-Known Member

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    If children are learning something for the first time, don't you think it could be confusing to teach multiple ways to solve a problem before they fully understand at least one of the methods? Isn't there a chance that the proven, successful method would get diluted and washed out by all the extra information that the child can't understand?
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  3. orangeblueorangeblue
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    orangeblueorangeblue Well-Known Member

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    Read the article - it's optional methodology.

    I think, from a comprehension standpoint, the "more confusing" method actually teaches you a bit more about why you get what you get. The "old way" is sort of a shorthand trick, really.
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  4. shelbygt350
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    shelbygt350 Well-Known Member

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    Ok, maybe we can actually test old fashioned vs recent (past 20 - 25 yrs) education (not just common core):

    (1) go into a store with intent to pay cash, wait till it is rung up, hand clerk paper money, wait till they input that round dollar bill amount, then say, wait, I have some change, and give them the odd change (eg $17.42 bill, hand them $20 bill, then hand them 2 quarters and 2 pennies).

    (2) go find a relatively recent college graduate in American History. Tell them you love American History. Ask them what they thought of the books by Anna Reed on Washington, Joseph Plumb Martin on Rev War, and any others written say pre 1900. See if you get dumbfounded look.

    (3) when talking to an attorney under the age of 35, ask them how was their course in law school on the US Constitution? Mostly likely not taken (not required anymore).

    (4) when talking to a public school teacher, ask them how would they like to have a class of 40-50 kids ? Watch the horror in their face then listen to the answer.

    (5) in hiring a potential employee, take them to a private room, give them a pen and legal pad, tell them they have 10 minutes to write all the reasons they want to come to work for your firm. Then come back in 8 minutes and read (if you can) the reasons.

    The above will illustrate (A) the inability to do simple math in head (which is good for the brain, yes we love calculators), (B) the lack of knowledge of those who wrote first hand accounts and experiences (C) the lack of knowledge of US Const by legal profession (they rely on "precedence"), (D) the lack of parenting and discipline in homes and (E) the inability to communicate (maybe this post is an example ! Ha Ha).
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  5. Gatorrick22
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    Gatorrick22 Well-Known Member

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    Does the common core teach the times tables? I know that's a shortcut, but aren't shortcuts supposed to be like learning important things. Things like school rules, do-s, don't-s, and other regulations for school? And lets not forget that learning history is pure memorization.
  6. Gatorrick22
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    Gatorrick22 Well-Known Member

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    A "trick"? So learning history or anything from the past is a "trick" now? Do they teach that "trick" in school still?
  7. orangeblueorangeblue
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    orangeblueorangeblue Well-Known Member

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    No, it's a trick because it gets you to the solution without you fully understanding how or why.

    And yes, they absolutely use it and it's apparently included in Common Core as well.
  8. orangeblueorangeblue
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    orangeblueorangeblue Well-Known Member

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    http://www.usnews.com/news/special-...n-core-math-standards-content-and-controversy
  9. Gatorrick22
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    Gatorrick22 Well-Known Member

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    So... you're saying that this faux AGW is a trick?
  10. Gatorrick22
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    Gatorrick22 Well-Known Member

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    I think, therefore I am... 1=1
  11. orangeblueorangeblue
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    orangeblueorangeblue Well-Known Member

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    A. I have no idea how this applies. Like not even a little bit.

    B. Yes, I've stated many times that I don't think climate change is man-made
  12. Gatorrick22
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    Gatorrick22 Well-Known Member

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    Lol!
  13. orangeblueorangeblue
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    orangeblueorangeblue Well-Known Member

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    You start drinking early today?
  14. chemgator
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    chemgator Well-Known Member

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    I understand that it's optional. But teachers may feel pressured to use it, especially if their principal decides to tell them to use it. Children need to start their education with something simple, like memorization. It's what they are best at. If you don't believe me, use an obscene word in front of your 4-year-old and see how many repetitions that it takes before your child uses it in the correct context in a sentence. Then see how long you regret saying that word in front of your child. When it comes to recognizing patterns and developing a deeper understanding of how math works, that will come in time. Some children will learn it on their own, and some will wait until a teacher in a later grade (or a parent, or another kid) spells it out for them. In the early years, we should take advantage of children's sponge-like ability to memorize things, and then work on confusing them (and teaching them to think for themselves) later. The risk of having confused, stressed-out children who can't do simple math and actually hate math is just too great.

    Elementary school students are not little college students with dumbed-down curricula.
  15. Gatormb
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    Gatormb Well-Known Member

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    Because batteries go dead?o_O
  16. vaxcardinal
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    vaxcardinal Well-Known Member

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    calculators dont care whether you use common core or not
  17. orangeblueorangeblue
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    orangeblueorangeblue Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure I follow - smaller kids will still learn this to start and then begin to learn how it works.
  18. chemgator
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    chemgator Well-Known Member

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    Except they aren't learning it. They are breaking down crying and deciding they don't like math anymore.

    I can't think of anything worse for the future of the U.S. than to have large numbers of children decide they hate mathematics. (Well, besides maybe having Obama "serve" a third term.) We had a simple system for teaching children math, and it worked. Then we switched systems, to the point that even the children's parents cannot understand it, and now children hate the subject. This is a clear case of school administration "creativity" that spends your tax dollars and not only does not provide any value, it destroys value. It reminds me of our neighbor's experience with Head Start (their three-year-old was taught Chinese at home and spoke no English, so her Head Start instructors yelled lessons at her in English every day until she cried). Democrats: paying more to torture children for their own good.
  19. g8orbill
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    g8orbill Gators VIP Member

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    I read the article and have talked to the 2 teachers who are my neighbors and have read numerous other articles- I find Common Core concerning- it talks about teaching students critical thinking but then when you read the way certain sections are written it has a decidedly liberal slant- it seems to me that it is pushing students to arrive at the particular finding they want- and it does not seem to spend much time on Civics, American History or the Constitution-yes it is in the reading but there is no real break down to help kids understand how our guvment is "supposed" to work.
  20. philnotfil
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    philnotfil Well-Known Member

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    One of the reasons why so many people hate math (this isn't a new thing) is that they were taught the short cuts when they were younger and weren't prepared to really do math when they hit high school. One of the main reasons for teaching many different methods when they are younger is so that they will be better prepared to do math when they get to high school.

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