Business Proposition:

Discussion in 'Gator Country Health and Fitness' started by ATL_Gator, Jan 24, 2013.

  1. ATL_Gator
    Offline

    ATL_Gator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2008
    Messages:
    1,340
    Likes Received:
    1,402
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Acworth, GA
    Ratings Received:
    +1,413
    To start: I am an engineer. I recognize that my sense of humor is "off". This is mostly a joke.

    --------

    In light of current research showing that overweight and slightly obese people tend to live longer than perfectly fit people. Forget being a fitness instructor, health professional, so on and so forth. This "research" is doing nothing but driving people to an early grave.

    Beyond that, the goal of helping people get fit is too short sighted. Obtain a client, set on a path, away they go. It's fire and forget. Your business longevity is getting additional clients. Sure, you may have some repeat customers, but I bet those are few compared to the number of new clients you will need for a long, successful career.

    Instead, become a "Life Optimizer"

    At a given point in a person's life, they have some level of ability. So, let us track a person's ability over time:

    [​IMG]

    The red curve above represents the ability of a "normal" overweight individual (78 is the average age for the current US population). Notice the benefit of 6 additional years of life! From birth, we really have very little restrictions to our ability (omitting the obvious limitations of babies). Sure, there are things that we can't do, but we are often not physically limited because of our body shape/weight. As we age we naturally lose some overall ability. The amount of weight and shape of our bodies also provides additional "knockdowns" to one's ability at a given age.

    Now, given just this curve, I propose that the area under the curve is DIRECTLY proportional to one's "general happiness". This is exactly what the current fitness industry is selling you on. Losing weight increases your ability, and makes you happier. Thus, the green curve below represents a fit person's life span.

    [​IMG]

    Notice the increased area under the curve... to the sacrifice of total number of years. The last 6 years of one's life are generally miserable. Pain, chronic illness, sight loss, hearing loss, and you may not even be able to go to the bathroom by yourself. So give up some "bad years" and be happier now. In general, sounds pretty good right? Sell that to a person who is 77 years old. I bet they would GLADLY want the 6 extra years to spend with family/friends, as they are already dealing with some of that stuff anyway...

    In comes the "LIFE OPTIMIZER"

    [​IMG]

    As a Life Optimizer, you aim to coach people along their life time to follow the blue curve. On that path, you provide "fitness" to your clients in their youth, maximizing both ability and happiness. As they start nearing "old age", you transition them into a phase of gaining weight so they can experience the life extending benefits the overweight population has, without having to deal with the life-long pain and restrictions of managing that weight.

    The key is starting the weight gain at the appropriate time (thus, the optimization part). Start it too soon, and you sacrifice overall happiness during one's life (as the upper area between the green and blue curves is greater than the lower area between the green and blue curves). Start it too late, and your client doesn't get the life extending benefits (affects happiness).

    Sound impossible? How long does it take to put on weight? Not long right? It doesn't in my case. I would bet I could put on 50 lb in a year, easy. From what I have read of the studies (reading headlines and skimming blogs/articles), they just mention that the overweight live longer, didn't mention if they were overweight their entire life.

    Call now to become a Life Optimizer, and give people the best and longest their life can possibly be.
    --------

    the preceding advertisement is brought to you buy: ______
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Dreamliner
    Online

    Dreamliner Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    65,433
    Likes Received:
    487
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings Received:
    +2,339
    Hehe, I like it. I suspect that 'fitness trainers' are going to be squeezed out*+, given what we've learned about obesity, since they're not strength and conditioning coaches and have functioned, on the ground, as 'weight-loss specialists;, wherein we know that weight-loss doesn't work.

    Exercise is just as bad as weight-loss. The recidivism rate for exercise is even worse. People literally won't do it unless they have someone standing over them. So, we might as well give up on that too. I mean, if they're going to exercise furiously while under the tutelage of a fitness trainer, then stop when they run out of money ... why bother ?

    Now, the strength and conditioning coach, the 'exercise supervisor' does have a legitimate function, but his/her niche is exceedingly narrow. That is, other than competitive athletes, not many actually need one.

    Movement issues ? See a physical therapist. And I don't like chiros cracking my neck, but turns out they're pretty good on general movement issues. Pain ? Go to a doctor. Just thinking aloud here.

    As to gaining weight, I'm not sure that consciously putting it on late is of any value. People just put it on. It's the taking it off part that is dangerous.

    Additionally, whereas strength and mobility does tend to tail off in the twilight years, oddly enough, it's manifestly not the case that we're living longer because they've got us hooked to machines. It is rather the case that active life expectancy is increasing faster than life expectancy! Clearly, old people are getting around and doing stuff.

    This is not to say that I see little value in having someone in their lives to show them how to maintain the vigor of the their slightly younger years. But then that's not so much a life-extender as a life-enhancer.

    Let me throw something else into the mix: rather than "living sicker, longer", we are more accurately the "worried well." I can see this Life Optimizer stemming health hysteria, the person who's keeping his clients out of the doctor's office, and keeping them healthier by countering widespread and cockamamie notions like "this food makes you healthy" and "this food will make you ill", that kind of stuff.

    The part I like about this is that the Life Optimizer sounds a bit like a Life Coach, albeit with more of a focus on the body. And Life Coaches I know charge thousands and thousands of dollars. Since we're all going to die anyway, the Life Optimizer could mostly usurp the function of the general practitioner and his/her office wouldn't reek of alcohol either.

    *I'm only kidding about the demise of the fitness trainers. Conventional wisdom dies hard. Both doctors and fitness trainers are going to resist the new paradigm of loving your basic shape. You watch: they're getting ready to ramp up the hysteria even further. And advertisers, magazines are going to pour on the pressure to be thin if only for reasons of vanity.

    +And never mind the helping professionals, the public at large will likely resist the new paradigm. They will continue to herd themselves into cultural conformity and continue to heed the siren song of "thinner = happier" and founder on the rocks again and again. Funny, I now introduce myself as the guy who tells people to stop dieting and start living. And I'm getting fluttering eyelids, from women especially, who are inclined to ask, "But, but what if people want to lose weight ?'
  3. Dreamliner
    Online

    Dreamliner Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    65,433
    Likes Received:
    487
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings Received:
    +2,339
    Maybe the Life Optimizer could work like the family attorney, keep him/her on retainer ? Or maybe bring him/her in at critical junctures like a financial planner ? The Life Optimizer would send regular birthday cards and Christmas cards and remind families and individuals "Time for your checkup!"

    It would actually be much cheaper than an attorney. Cheaper even than a financial planner. And conceivably subscribers could cut back a bit on health insurance and disability.
  4. UFNut
    Offline

    UFNut Premium Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Messages:
    742
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    Ratings Received:
    +7
    I hear what you're saying, but gonna disagree I have less ability at 4 years old than I had at 2 years old....and certainly more ability at 18 than the day I was born. Have you ever watched a baby stand up or take it's first steps...they are inherently weak limbed in the legs, and their bone structure is not even fully developed until their early teens...at birth their knees and many bones in their bodies are composed primarily of cartilage (I would presume to make it easier to fit through that tiny outlet by which they appear). Interesting fact...they actually have far more bones than an adult human, they merge as they grow older into the standard 206 from the textbooks. Anyway....just think for consistency in your definition of abilities you have to ramp up during childhood/teen years in addition to ramp down as they get older.

    Interesting that the average individual on your graph lives to 78, and you say the overweight person lives longer....but as far as I can tell the overweight person IS the average...but maybe I'm just being picky :).

    p.s. I am an engineer as well, and love your graphs :)
  5. Dreamliner
    Online

    Dreamliner Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    65,433
    Likes Received:
    487
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings Received:
    +2,339
    Nut, are you an angel investor ? I'm ready to get going on this thing.
  6. ATL_Gator
    Offline

    ATL_Gator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2008
    Messages:
    1,340
    Likes Received:
    1,402
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Acworth, GA
    Ratings Received:
    +1,413

    ACK!

    You know what I was thinking as I was writing this and uploading the graphs? EXACTLY the "newborn oversight"... I did the graphs while transferring some files at work (this took longer :)), and didn't really have time to fix them. Probably shouldn't have found the time to do them in the first place. LOL.

    As to the average part... 78 was chosen because the "average" life expectancy in the US is currently 78, and I just picked a number to put there. That said, you did bring up a point that I didn't think about....

    Per Dream's recent links to studies... The studies (they didn't really study anything, more data mine and sort, but still) measure "risk of death" normalized to "normal weight per BMI in some 100's of thousands of deaths. Average BMI having a risk of death of 1.0, overweight people had a 0.94 and obese class 1 had a 0.95 (less risk). class 2 and class 3 obesity carried a 1.24 or so risk (ACK!). Oddly enough, I do not recall seeing any underweight parts of the study... though those may be difficult to find.

    SO..... I had made the connection, "average life span" is that of the average person, and they have "normal BMI"... but that may be wrong. The average person is currently overweight... therefore, the overweight/obese1 line should go to 78, and the "fit person/average weight" (green) line should go to 72.
  7. Juggernautz
    Offline

    Juggernautz Don't Tread on me! VIP Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2007
    Messages:
    37,761
    Likes Received:
    693
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Yulee FL
    Ratings Received:
    +863
    Spoken like true health nuts. Thanks for the insight though.
  8. bakaduin
    Offline

    bakaduin Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2007
    Messages:
    16,604
    Likes Received:
    215
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Ratings Received:
    +978
    Dream if you don't believe obese people should lose weight and you believe exercise "is just as bad as weight loss" you must have made very little money as a personal trainer.

    Obese client walks into your office: "You don't have to lose weight that would be bad for you".

    Fit person walks into your office: "Stop exercising it's bad for you!"
  9. Dreamliner
    Online

    Dreamliner Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    65,433
    Likes Received:
    487
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ratings Received:
    +2,339
    Why should I take you seriously ? Nonetheless, I'll suffer to explain my position one more time:

    Obesity: highly heritable and clearly not ipso facto harmful. No one is dying 'from being fat.' Yes, upper levels of obesity are associated with various diseases. But again, no evidence that obesity causes said diseases. So why should we badger fat people into losing weight ?

    Weight-loss: almost everyone can achieve it ... short-term. Almost no one can keep it off long-term. Therefore, as a fitness trainer, knowing that health can be improved via weight-neutral strategies, why on God's green earth (threw in God for you there), should I be a party to a strategy which will almost certainly lead to more frustration and failure and quite possibly other ill effects ? Whatever happened to "do no harm" ?

    Exercise: I am not telling people not to do it. I think it's good. I remain a FITNESS trainer. I'm just not a weight-loss specialist anymore, which is how fitness trainers typically function. Further, I am inviting people to be reasonable. That is, they are even less likely to sustain a particular fitness strategy than to maintain weight-loss. Therefore, I invite people to find active pursuits they enjoy and are likely to maintain.

Share This Page