Beals EPA

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by G8trGr8t, Dec 21, 2013.

  1. G8trGr8t
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    G8trGr8t Premium Member

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    Now we know why his boss was not held accountable for him succesfully defrauding the agency for years. She is now the head of the EPA. Can't make this up.

    From 2009 until 2013, the head of OAR was Gina McCarthy, who is currently the EPA Administrator. So not only was Beale within view of senior managers as he pulled off his astounding fraud, he was directly managed by the woman who now runs the place. And if there was any doubt about how influential John Beale was in formulating key EPA policies, it seems to have been put to rest by E&E Publishing's Greenwire. Via a Freedom of Information Act request, the trade publication obtained a collection of agency emails related to Beale.

    At 10:44 a.m. EST on December 3, 2010, Ms. McCarthy wrote to her staff at OAR and reported: "I am pleased to let you know that John Beale will be resuming his role as the Immediate Office's lead for all of OAR's international work." She added: "Most of you know John well as he has been a very large presence in much of OAR's work for over 20 years. In addition to lead roles in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the early implementation of the Act, the development and negotiation of the National Low Emission Vehicle Program, and the 1997 [National Ambient Air Quality Standards] review, John served as OAR's lead for international work from 1990 thru [sic] 2005. Beginning in 1999, John managed OAR's work on climate change as well as all other international work."
    Ms. McCarthy further gushed that "I am very excited to finally get the opportunity to work closely with him. In addition to the international work John will continue to work on various special projects for me."
    There's more. In an odd conclusion to that December 2010 staff bulletin, Ms. McCarthy wrote that Beale "is supposed to be sitting in [office] 5426B of Ariel Rios North, but good luck finding him. We are keeping him well hidden so he won't get scooped away from OAR anytime soon." Few CEOs in private business could keep their jobs after lauding and entrusting with key responsibilities the perpetrator of a fraud against the company

    Are we now supposed to believe that in contrast to his other lies, the work Beale chose to perform at EPA is the product of careful and honest analysis? What Congress needs to examine is whether the policies that the head of EPA says were shaped to a large degree by Beale were also based on fraud.

    Oh, and what Gina McCarthy knew or suspected, and why she so admired a fraudster.


    http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303773704579266022892025230

    Yet the MSM is silent on the follow through
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  2. asuragator
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    asuragator Well-Known Member

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    Definitely raises some questions, though my prediction is that he'll be punished, she'll be probed, nothing will come of it other than she'll take some flack for not having questioned his whereabouts more.

    Though WSJ's claim about 'few CEO's in private biz could keep their job...' is rubbish. Few would lose their jobs either for a fraud perpetrated by someone else even if the CEO previously lauded this person.
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2013
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  3. Gatorrick22
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    Gatorrick22 Well-Known Member

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    I disagree.
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  4. VAg8r1
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    VAg8r1 Well-Known Member

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    Since Beale's shenanigans date back at least to 2000 and possibly to 1989, I'm not sure how Gina McCarthy can be held responsible.
    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/12/18/the-epa-s-million-dollar-con-man.html
  5. asuragator
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    asuragator Well-Known Member

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    Liar :D
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  6. G8trGr8t
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    try telling that to Steven Cohen or Jamie dimon. Congress held hearings on london whale losses that didn't cost taxpayers a dime while policies put in place by Beal have saddled industry with billions in expense
  7. G8trGr8t
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    so because the people before her were also incompetent her incompetence doesn't matter? is that your arguement?

    anybody that was supervising and promoting this clown should be held accountable. pub/dem/man/woman/white/black...don't care. Congress and regulators want to claw back cash from traders that lost money but you never hear about them wanting to hold public employees accountable for poor supervision.

    everybody was jumping on BP but nobody in the regulatory agency being paid to supervise them got in big trouble. there is little to no accountability for failure to do your job in public sector employment, probably due to the strength of their unions and the go along, get along mentality that is systemic in the gubmnt
  8. asuragator
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    asuragator Well-Known Member

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    The same Jamie Dimon that still has a job despite the London whale and over six billion in losses? (see my earlier point about CEO's losing their jobs as being rubbish).

    Well, they've had hearings about Beal as well, but the assumption you are making is that somehow the policies are a fraud. That might be your opinion, but it is not fact. Not to mention, how much did that banking crisis cost the US, all told?
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2013
  9. G8trGr8t
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    how much did the London whale cost the US taxpayer?

    JP Morgan lost their own money and then was fined $300M by regulators.

    Beal cost taxpayers $1m and who knows how much more in poor policy decisions and his boss got promoted to head one of, if not the most powerful agency in the fed gubmnt. And Gina McCarthy was never called to testify before congress

    another nugget...even after his fraud was discovered, one of Beal's former supervisors who did testify, but kept his job with no reprcussions, was letting Beal use his guest house. this is who got Beal the job and recommended him for all kinds of unwarranted bonuses

    Rep. Darrell Issa (R., Calif.), the head of the powerful House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, had asked one of Beale’s former supervisors, Robert Brenner, if he had seen Beale lately.
    “I’ve seen Mr. Beale,” Brenner testified, pausing to chew over his next sentence. “Well, I’ve seen him a lot over the last two weeks. He’s renting out his home, so he’s staying in my guest house right now.”


    http://freebeacon.com/the-spook-that-never-was/

    “In my years at WWS, I especially enjoyed the opportunity to learn from (and play softball and tennis with) a talented and fun group of fellow students,” Beale wrote on his graduate alumni page. “And, when the opportunity arose to help develop the new Clean Air Act, I was able to convince my best friend from those days, John Beale M.P.A. ’77, to join me in the effort.”
    Brenner testified that he and Beale vacationed at a house they co-owned in Massachusetts about once a year from the period of about 1983 to 1989.
    Brenner hired Beale as a consultant in 1988. He was promoted to a full-time position in 1989. It was then, investigators say, that his deceptions began.
    The inspector general’s office has said that Beale’s lies date back to 1989, when he falsely said on his employment application that he had worked for former Sen. John Tunney (D., Calif).
    Brenner recommended Beale for a 25 percent “retention bonus” in 1991. The bonuses are meant to incentivize EPA employees to stay with the agency if they have another job offer. Investigators found no documentation of another job offer.
    “I don’t remember if we had it in writing or if we obtained the info through a phone call, but there was an offer,” Brenner said.
    “There is no job offer if it’s not in the file,” Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D., N.Y.) said.
    “I can answer that,” Sullivan interjected. “Mr. Beale told us he never had an offer.


    Beale continued to receive an annual retention bonus until 2000, despite a three-year limit on the perk.
    Beale bought out Brenner’s share of their vacation house in 1997. Under testimony, Brenner initially couldn’t recall how much he was paid, but when pressed, he said between $30,000 and $40,000.
    Three years later, Brenner recommended Beale again for the retention bonus. Brenner’s lawyer insisted “there is simply no link between the two” actions.
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2013
  10. asuragator
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    asuragator Well-Known Member

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    Not really their own money--but that's too much of an issue I can take on tonight. But JPMorgan will be able to take a tax write off their settlement deal...which is money lost $$ for the govt.

    But let's not try to compare Beal with with our banking problems. His is individualistic amateur stuff, comparatively.
  11. G8trGr8t
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    the issue to me is that private industry is often raked over the coals, and rightfully so, while public sector failures carry little to no repercussions to those associated with the failures. banks fined billions for selling bad paper to F & F but nobody at F & F held accountable for failure to do due diligence. Lots of examples of this, Beal is just one of many. No accountability required if you work for the gubmnt. Failure is okay just as long as you keep your mouth shut and go along.
  12. asuragator
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    asuragator Well-Known Member

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    It's really not true that there is no accountability working for government--I think you are just basing it on higher profile government workers--at the political appointee level or just below it (and at that point, some of them might as well be political appointees). But you don't hear about many of them that get fired--and they do. Government regulatory agencies do have a job to do--and whether some private sector folk get raked over the coals, well sometimes that is just what is needed--just as as sometimes public employees do as well. To borrow my wife's terminology, it's ear sh** laughing at nose sh**, or as we say in the US, pot calling the kettle black. Just as folks like Beale get away with things, so do the Jamie Dimon's of the world.

    Singling out F&F misses the role of the banks in this--who not just wanted those high risk loans to trade--they created the financial instruments (CDOs and synthetic CDOs) to make it happen. It's still pot/kettle stuff (and I am not just trying to make it all equivalent, but there is nonetheless a lot more parallels that some want to acknowledge).
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013
  13. G8trGr8t
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    What is turnover rate for fed/state jobs vs private sector? Should that metric tell you anything?
  14. asuragator
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    asuragator Well-Known Member

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    Don't know. Depends on what you are talking about both in the private sector and government.

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