An open letter to Charles Rangel..

Discussion in 'Too Hot for Swamp Gas' started by mocgator, Aug 2, 2013.

  1. asuragator
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    asuragator Well-Known Member

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    Here's some more. But look, I don't believe all or even most republicans are racist, not even close, but racism that exists is still a much bigger problem on the right than on the left.

    here
    here
    here
    here
    here
    here
    here
    here
    here
  2. LittleBlueLW
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    LittleBlueLW Premium Member

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  3. Allanon
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    Allanon Well-Known Member

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    He can join Riley in sensitivity training.
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  4. ursidman
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    ursidman Well-Known Member

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    at Chosin Reservoir IIRC
  5. Gatormb
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    Gatormb Well-Known Member

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    Name ten that switched.
  6. Row6
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    Row6 New Member

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    early 1960s – Arthur Ravenel, Jr., before running for the South Carolina Senate, later U.S. Representative from South Carolina (1987–1995)
    1960s – James F. Byrnes, the former 104th Governor of South Carolina (1951–1955) and 49th United States Secretary of State (1945–1947)
    1960 - Claude R. Kirk, Jr., later 36th Governor of Florida (1967–1971)
    1961 – Charlton Lyons to run for Louisiana's 4th congressional district seat
    1962 – Dave Treen, later U.S. Representative from Louisiana (1973–1980) and 51st Governor of Louisiana (1980–1984)
    1962 – Jack M. Cox, to run for Governor of Texas; losing to later Republican convert John B. Connally, Jr.
    1962 – James D. Martin, former U.S. Representative from Alabama (1965–1967)
    1962 – Ronald Reagan of California, while an actor and former Screen Actors Guild president[38]. Later 40th President of the United States (1981–1989)
    1962 – Floyd Spence, while a South Carolina state Representative; later a U.S. Representative from South Carolina (1971–2001)
    1963 - Rubel Phillips, former Mississippi Public Service Commissioner, to run for governor of Mississippi
    1964 - Howard Callaway, prior to becoming the first Republican U.S. representative from Georgia since Reconstruction (1965–1967) and later 11th United States Secretary of the Army
    1964 - Charles W. Pickering, later Judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Mississippi (2004)
    1964 – Strom Thurmond, while U.S. senator from South Carolina (1954–2003) switched to the Republican party on September 16, 1964.[3]
    1965 – Albert W. Watson, while U.S. Representative from South Carolina (1963–1971) (resigned before switching parties and regained his seat in a special election)
    1965 – Arlen Specter, while running for District Attorney of Philadelphia (1966–1974), later U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania (1981–2011); in 2009, he switched back to the Democratic Party but later criticized Democratic party leadership [39].
    1965 – Roderick Miller, member of the Louisiana House of Representatives, after unsuccessful run for judgeship in 1964
    1966 - Marshall Parker, to run for the U.S. Senate in South Carolina; twice defeated by Fritz Hollings
    1966 – Thomas A. Wofford, former U.S. Senator from South Carolina (1956), before write-in campaign for State Senator from South Carolina
    1966 – Len E. Blaylock, to support Winthrop Rockefeller for Governor of Arkansas, later U.S. Marshal for the Eastern District of Arkansas (1975–1978)
    1966 – Jerry Thomasson, switched from Democrat to Republican while an state Representative to run for Attorney General of Arkansas
    1966 – Henry Grover of Texas, switched from Democrat to Republican while a state Representative before successfully running for Texas Senate.
    1967 – William E. Dannemeyer, while serving as a superior court judge before returning to the California State Assembly, later U.S. Representative from California (1979–1992)
    1967 – Allison Kolb, former Louisiana State Auditor (1952–1956), while seeking a political comeback running unsuccessfully for state Treasurer, lost 1956 Democratic primary for state auditor
    1968 – William Reynolds Archer, Jr., while a member of the Texas House of Representatives, later U.S. Representative from Texas (1971–2001)
    1968 – Will Wilson, former Texas Attorney General (1957–1963) switched to support Richard M. Nixon in the 1968 presidential election
    1968 – James L. Bentley, Comptroller General of Georgia (1963–1971), switched to Republican, along with four other statewide constitutional officers. Bentley then lost the 1970 Republican gubernatorial nomination.
    1970s[edit source | editbeta]
    1970 – Jesse Helms, two years before running for the U.S. Senate from North Carolina (1973–2003)
    1970 – A. C. Clemons, while serving in the Louisiana Senate
    1970 – William Oswald Mills, later became U.S. Representative from Maryland (1971–1973)
    1970 – Bob Barr, who later became U.S. Representative from Georgia (1995–2003); later left the GOP to run as a Libertarian for U.S. president in 2008
    1971 – Tillie K. Fowler, who later became U.S. Representative from Florida (1993–2001)
    1972 - Ed Karst, while serving as the mayor of Alexandria, Louisiana; later returned to the Democrats and then became "No Party"
    1972 – Robert R. Neall, before serving in the Maryland House of Delegates. He switched back to the Democratic Party in 1999
    1972 – Trent Lott, prior to running to become U.S. Representative from Mississippi (1973–1989) and later U.S. Senator from Mississippi (1989–2007) . He was administrative assistant to Rules Committee chairman William Colmer, who endorsed Lott as his successor despite Lott's party switch.
    1973 – Mills E. Godwin Jr., 60th Governor of Virginia from 1966 to 1970 and Lieutenant Governor of Virginia (1962–1966). Later 62th Governor (1974–1978)
    1973 – Samuel I. Hayakawa, later U.S. Senate from California (1977–1983)
    1973 – John Connally, former 61st United States Secretary of the Treasury (1971–1972) and former 39th Governor of Texas (1963–1969)
    1975 – Elizabeth Dole, while employed by the Federal Trade Commission. Later 8th United States Secretary of Transportation (1983–1987), 20th United States Secretary of Labor (1989–1990) and U.S. Senator from North Carolina (2003–2009)
    1975 – John Jarman, while U.S. Representative from Oklahoma (1951–1977). He had served for 24 years in the House and said he was fed up with the Democratic Party, which had been "taken over by liberals"..
    1977 – A. J. McNamara, while serving in the Louisiana House
    1977 – Lane Carson, while serving in the Louisiana House
    1978 – Robert G. Jones, after leaving the Louisiana Senate
    1978 – Chris Smith, managed the unsuccessful 1976 New Jersey Senate primary campaign of Democrat Steve Foley. Later became the U.S. Representative from New Jersey (1981-present) [40].
    late 1970s – Thomas Bliley, after being Mayor of Richmond, Virginia, and later U.S. Representative from Virginia (1981–2001)
    late 1970s – Michael F. "Mike" Thompson, while serving in the Louisiana House
    1979 – Charles Grisbaum, Jr., member of the Louisiana House from Jefferson Parish
    1979 – Ed Scogin, member of the Louisiana House from St. Tammany Parish
  7. northgagator
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    northgagator Well-Known Member

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    And Timothy Mcveigh was raised as a Roman Catholic, enlisted into the US Army, and was awarded the Bronze Star for his service in Iraq.

    What good a man did in one position or phase in his life does not give him a pass for bad behavior for the rest of his life.
  8. OB1
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    OB1 Active Member

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    Row, does this change the reality that in both the house and the senate a higher percentage of republicans voted for CRA '64 than democrats! Which shows you are saying a small percentage of Dixiecrats switched parties, many did not, but ignores the reality of the vote.

    It wasn't a dem vs pub thing, it was a South vs North thing! The reality is the act was a bipartisan work.

    Many of the racist dems remained dems. Robert Byrd grand whatever he was in the KKK never switched! 14 hours of filibuster himself! Very impressive!

    Your trying to make it a partisan thing, but the majority of the both parties supported the act.

    It's Great to be a Florida Gator!
  9. Row6
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    Row6 New Member

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    I agree that it was bi-partisan and a mostly N vs S thing. I was countering the lame idea suggested by moc that it was Republican thing. I can pretty much guarantee however that if we didn't have the Civil Rights Act of 1964 now, the overwhelming number - if not unanimous - vote of today's democrats would be in favor of it and republicans would mostly oppose it (Overt racism wouldn't be the reason though a covert form would be part of that opposition). That is what especially makes a mockery of moc's claim. Dollars to donuts he would oppose it now.
  10. gator34654
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    gator34654 Well-Known Member

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    108 imo your mind is sooooo convinced of victemhood you can't/won't see the light even though its right in front of you. You suspect repubs are out the get the black man and that couldn't be further from the truth. You can't see that your own party has enslaved AAs and the poor by keeping them on the welfare system and sucking on the government tit to the point they are accustomed to it and want handouts. Your cop out answer is poverty and no jobs. How about broken families, babies being raised by single moms, kids growing up basically raising themselves, who is going to provide structure, or teach values, or help them to complete homework. It's a culture issue. Why is it always the black race that yells we're victims? Don't see that really from Hispanics, Asians, Cubans or other races who have entered this country?

    Take the cubans and haitians in Florida near Miami, they came, took whatever jobs available sometimes working two jobs to support their families. They work their way up from entry level jobs. These people aren't belly aching for handouts, or affirmative action, or give us this job weather or not we're qualified. Nothing is ever going to change for AAs with this mindset that the world owes them something because of the color of their skin. Maybe when AAs take responsibility for themselves positive things will result.
  11. gator34654
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    gator34654 Well-Known Member

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    C Rangel is fined and shamed...

    Not. Just as expected nothing. It's okay to call tea party people racist crackers, or is it cracka's these days as long as you're a liberal or an AA. Paula Dean says the n word a long time ago, but a liberal actor berates a gay person and Paula is pelted with insults and more. But no there's no double standard here folks, nothing to see. All is well in America under BO.

    O, for those who say wait, CR will get negative attention, as soon as RC video came out so did the claws. As for good ole CR it's (listen good) chirp chirp.
  12. LeesGator
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    LeesGator Active Member

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    Disagree about your republican statement. I think the majority of people on both sides are good and decent. Charles uses the race card as a buffer to those who may disagree with him. It becomes easy for him to say their racist versus true intellectual debate. Its a handy little thing to have.
  13. northgagator
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    northgagator Well-Known Member

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    It is amazing that not once but twice Alex Baldwin has made a total ass out of himself and yet he still gets TV work. No double standard here.
  14. orangeblueorangeblue
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    orangeblueorangeblue Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure I follow. Are Charles Rangel or Riley Cooper comedic actors?
  15. gator34654
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    gator34654 Well-Known Member

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    ahhh, of course, if you're a comedian and upset you also get a pass. I forget the new standards...
  16. gator34654
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    gator34654 Well-Known Member

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    What if Senator Sessions of Alabama said the naacp is a bunch of black N's would that go over well? Would that get scant attention? But CR can call tea party white crackers and no big deal? Why? Because A. he's a big liberal. 2. He's a democrat. 3. He's black. So when some of you get high and mighty about calling out RC it's revealing how you turn a blind eye to people like CR.
  17. DaveFla
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    DaveFla VIP Member

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    That's the 'Jon Stewart Rule.'
  18. orangeblueorangeblue
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    orangeblueorangeblue Well-Known Member

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    These are not new standards. Different jobs have different expectations. It's been that way forever.
  19. orangeblueorangeblue
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    orangeblueorangeblue Well-Known Member

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    Yeah it's weird, Jon Stewart's allowed to drop the F bomb at work regularly and yet most of us would get some sort of discipline.

    DOUBLE STANDARD!!
  20. candymanfromgc
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    candymanfromgc Well-Known Member

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    Come on Junior, you really going to defend the racist Rangle.

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