4 Top Colleges just as good as any Ivy leagues School

Discussion in 'RayGator's Swamp Gas' started by g8orbill, Jul 25, 2014.

  1. g8orbill
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    g8orbill Gators VIP Member

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  2. Wormwood56
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    Nonsense. Florida, with 50,000+ students, cannot come close to an Ivy league school insofar as the quality of an education is concerned.
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  3. g8orbill
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    why are you on a Gator site if you feel that way

    article says different so please post something that proves your aassertion
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  4. oragator1
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    oragator1 Premium Member

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    True or not, it's excellent publicity for the school.
    And it's nice to see our school viewed positively by outsiders.
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  5. Wormwood56
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    I've been to Florida for my undergraduate, UCF for a graduate degree and Georgetown for another one. Based on my experiences, we are far closer to UCF than Georgetown, and Georgetown isn't even Ivy League.

    There are many public universities far better than Florida. Virginia, Berkeley (as much as I loathe to say it), UCLA, Michigan, North Carolina, the list goes on, and I don't even HAVE to mention the private schools like Duke, Stanford, Vandy, Washington University, Georgetown, and God know so many other schools.

    But if you want to go on and believe that Florida is somehow superior to these schools (and Texas, USC, Illinois, Emeory, Notre Dame, and a couple dozen other schools), knock yourself out.

    Florida is an excellent university for a large public university. Let's not pretend they are in the league of Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Cornell and Dartmouth...
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  6. GatorSean
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    GatorSean Well-Known Member

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    Well the article, if you'd bother to read it, puts a heavy emphasis on the total tuition cost which makes Georgetown and most of the other privates vastly less attractive when compared to cheap ol' Florida.
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  7. GatorStang
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    How long ago did you attend?
  8. JerseyGator01
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    The article referred to ROI, which UF excels at. I was an Accounting grad when the undergrad program was rated in the top 15 in the country. It depends on your major as to the quality at UF. UF had several elite programs when I was there.
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  9. mdfgator
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    mdfgator Well-Known Member

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    I disagree with this, no way we get the one on one, but we do have to compete and deal with a whole lot of people. I know plenty of family and friends that are ivy. I can take them all.
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  10. the_alphagator1906
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    This, I did pharmacy and it was top ten when I was there. It is still top 15 today. I am sorry wormwood but UF has some really good colleges that it is proud of that are nationally ranked. I understand the point you are trying to make but no need to act like UF is some trash school that doesn't belong with other elite universities.
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  11. viningsgator
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    Not sure if I would even be admitted today with the higher standards.
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  12. gatordavisl
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    Exactly. To make blanket claims about the quality of an institution's academic quality is mostly useless. The most relevant ratings would have to combine one's specific major, quality of life and amount of investment, etc.
  13. orangeblueorangeblue
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    orangeblueorangeblue Well-Known Member

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    There is a measurable difference but not commensurate with the difference in price.

    With Ivy League schools you're paying less for improved quality of education and more for connections.
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  14. enviroGator
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    One of the things we get dinged for every time is our 4-year graduation rate.

    I wonder if part of that issue is that, at least when I went through, the engineering programs were all 5-year programs for most people due to the number of required classes. I'm sure there were some that made it through in less than 5 years, but it was generally accepted that it would take 5 years even with summer classes.
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  15. maxgator
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    Wormwood I'm actually surprised at your knee jerk reaction. Typically you analyze everything to death. Maybe you should read the article.
  16. gatorcity
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    Yep. I still remember that giant almanac of majors they gave to upcoming freshmen. It laid out every course you would (or could) take each semester to help you plan your schedule, and every engineering degree took 5 years according to their plan. So I just assumed that's what I would do, and that is exactly what I did. I worked during the summers so I never took a summer class, but it took me five years and I'm glad it did. Got to see Tebow play and win a NC along with another from the basketball team in that last year.

    I'm not sure why that's a knock on a school, unless their audience is to paying parents who want their kids done in 4?
  17. Wormwood56
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    As a return on investment, there is no question that UF ranks high, as it is one of the cheapest public universities in the nation. But Ivy league caliber?
  18. Wormwood56
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    True to a point, but the pace in class is faster and more in-depth in the Ivys. Heck, I've attended many lectures (and gave a couple on geopolitical-military history) at UVa, and those kids aren't as sharp, at least in the macro sense. Yes, the Ivys have more than their share of legacies, but even the legacies are sharp, and have to make it through the programs in order to graduate.

    We're talking about the student to professor ratio, the number of GAs that "teach" a course versus the professor, the number of 500-person classes. Generally, the larger the university, the more auditorium classes you receive.

    Having been to several universities around the nation, I rank Florida quite high - among the large public schools. The closest comparables I have seen to UF are Texas, Ohio State, Maryland, Penn State and Georgia, all outstanding flagship universities. They are a tad behind Illinois, Wisconsin, and North Carolina, and substantially behind Berkeley (yuck!), Virginia, Michigan and UCLA.

    Stang, I have last visited Florida in 2011, attending a large history symposium there. The quality of the education hasn't changed all that much. Contrary to popular belief, Florida has always had a decent reputation for academics. It never was a school anyone could get into, and even back in the 1980s, the freshman curriculum was designed to weed the unserious out.
  19. mdfgator
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    Bingo.
  20. manigordo
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    I shouldn't be surprised, but the generalization and assumptions on this thread are ridiculous. (The same may be said for the article.)

    It is much safer to say that one can get a high quality education at any of the schools mentioned. But, it is not the same as an Ivy League experience which is far more than connections (though that part is also true.)

    When I was at Yale (and a visitor of classes at Harvard) I met a lot of famous people. More importantly, I had opportunities to have small classes with lecturers Milton Friedman and John Kenneth Galbraith and Buckminster Fuller. I was taught by Secretaries of the Interior, debated important authors, had a tutorial with Cornell West and other important contributors in their fields. Can't get more diverse views than Milton Friedman and Cornell West.

    There is a vast difference between seeing the deer and having seen tracks and think that is seeing the deer.

    Doesn't mean that one cannot find a great education (or great guests) at UF. But it is a vastly different experience.

    And, as far a price goes, though it was a long time ago, I got through on scholarships owing just a small amount when my education was completed all the way through grad school.

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