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  • Gators defensive end commitment Joey Ivie attended Florida's Friday Night Lights camp on July 27 of last year. / Gator Country file photo by Mike Capshaw

91 Days to
Toledo: DT Joey Ivie

Written by Nick de la Torre, June 1, 2013, 0 Comments,
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Over the next 91 days, GatorCountry will preview the players that make up the 2013 Florida Gators football team as we inch closer and closer to the season.

Each day we will count down using the player whose jersey number corresponds with how many days there are left until Florida kicks off against Toledo in the Swamp on August 31

Today we take a look at freshman early enrollee Joey Ivie.

 

History
A 6’4”, 269-pound defensive lineman from Pasco high school in Dade City, Ivie chose Florida over other scholarship offers from Florida State, Miami, Mississippi, Tennessee and Vanderbilt.

Ivie enrolled last spring and was a full participant in spring practice. Ivie competed with the rest of the defensive linemen and had his share of battles with Florida’s depleted offensive line. Ivie won some battles against D.J. Humphries and Jon Halapio but was given a “welcome to college young buck” moment when Jon Harrison pancaked him on back-to-back reps in one on one drills.

Will Muschamp mentioned Ivie several times throughout the spring and singled Ivie out as a young player who was competing and doing all the right things on and off the field and for showing up on campus in shape and ready to go.

 

Player Evaluation

Strengths

Ivie played strong side defensive end in high school but will slide inside and play defensive tackle or the 5-technique for the Gators. Ivie is already a big kid but has the frame where he could add another 15-20 pounds and become a serious physical presence in the middle of the defensive line.

Ivie shows a high football IQ and a unique ability to bat down passes even while he is being engaged by a linemen.

Ivie plays with a high motor. That relentless motor allows Ivie to seemingly always be around the ball on every play.

Ivie is a very sound and fundamental wrap-up tackler.

 

Weaknesses

Ivie didn’t play against the toughest competition at Pasco and often faced offensive linemen who were overmatched. This means he hasn’t really been challenged to develop rush moves or learned to use his hands effectively. He’ll need to improve in those two areas.

Ivie doesn’t have a great initial burst off of the line and relied on his strength and bull rush to overpower linemen in high school. He will need to find other ways to be an effective pass rusher and run stuffer, because he’s not ready to plow over SEC offensive linemen just yet.

Ivie played both defensive end and defensive tackle in high school but he will spend most of his time inside at Florida. He needs to get used to his new position and continue to add good size and fill out to play the position.

Ivie needs to work on his consistency as well. When he keeps his pad level low he can be disruptive in both the running and passing game but too often he stands straight up and becomes easier to block.

 

What to Expect
Honestly, before this past spring I would have said to expect Ivie to redshirt this season. However, he showed up in Gainesville in shape and ready to work. That work ethic impressed Coach Muschamp. Ivie has all the tools to become a very effective interior lineman but will need to polish up his technique, learn to play with his hands and become more consistent.

Ivie got off to a good start by enrolling early and impressing his head coach with his approach to he game but I think he will see very limited playing time this season. Ivie will develop into a productive player for the Gators and he could eventually become a starter down the road.

Nick de la Torre

About Nick de la Torre

A South Florida native, Nick developed a passion for all things sports at a very young age. His love for baseball was solidified when he saw Al Leiter’s no-hitter for the Marlins live in May of 1996. He was able to play baseball in college but quickly realized there isn’t much of a market for short, slow outfielders that hit around the Mendoza line. Wanting to continue with sports in some capacity he studied journalism at the University of Central Florida. Nick got his first start in the business as an intern for a website covering all things related to the NFL draft before spending two seasons covering the Florida football team at Bleacher Report. That job led him to GatorCountry. When he isn’t covering Gator sports, Nick enjoys hitting way too many shots on the golf course, attempting to keep up with his favorite t.v. shows and watching the Heat, Dolphins and Marlins. Follow him on twitter @NickdelatorreGC

http://www.gatorcountry.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/IvieJoey_120712_MikeCapshaw-150x150.jpg Nick de la Torre FootballThe Latest
Print Friendly

Over the next 91 days, GatorCountry will preview the players that make up the 2013 Florida Gators football team as we inch closer and closer to the season.

Each day we will count down using the player whose jersey number corresponds with how many days there are left until Florida kicks off against Toledo in the Swamp on August 31

Today we take a look at freshman early enrollee Joey Ivie.

 

History
A 6’4”, 269-pound defensive lineman from Pasco high school in Dade City, Ivie chose Florida over other scholarship offers from Florida State, Miami, Mississippi, Tennessee and Vanderbilt.

Ivie enrolled last spring and was a full participant in spring practice. Ivie competed with the rest of the defensive linemen and had his share of battles with Florida’s depleted offensive line. Ivie won some battles against D.J. Humphries and Jon Halapio but was given a “welcome to college young buck” moment when Jon Harrison pancaked him on back-to-back reps in one on one drills.

Will Muschamp mentioned Ivie several times throughout the spring and singled Ivie out as a young player who was competing and doing all the right things on and off the field and for showing up on campus in shape and ready to go.

 

Player Evaluation

Strengths

Ivie played strong side defensive end in high school but will slide inside and play defensive tackle or the 5-technique for the Gators. Ivie is already a big kid but has the frame where he could add another 15-20 pounds and become a serious physical presence in the middle of the defensive line.

Ivie shows a high football IQ and a unique ability to bat down passes even while he is being engaged by a linemen.

Ivie plays with a high motor. That relentless motor allows Ivie to seemingly always be around the ball on every play.

Ivie is a very sound and fundamental wrap-up tackler.

 

Weaknesses

Ivie didn’t play against the toughest competition at Pasco and often faced offensive linemen who were overmatched. This means he hasn’t really been challenged to develop rush moves or learned to use his hands effectively. He’ll need to improve in those two areas.

Ivie doesn’t have a great initial burst off of the line and relied on his strength and bull rush to overpower linemen in high school. He will need to find other ways to be an effective pass rusher and run stuffer, because he’s not ready to plow over SEC offensive linemen just yet.

Ivie played both defensive end and defensive tackle in high school but he will spend most of his time inside at Florida. He needs to get used to his new position and continue to add good size and fill out to play the position.

Ivie needs to work on his consistency as well. When he keeps his pad level low he can be disruptive in both the running and passing game but too often he stands straight up and becomes easier to block.

 

What to Expect
Honestly, before this past spring I would have said to expect Ivie to redshirt this season. However, he showed up in Gainesville in shape and ready to work. That work ethic impressed Coach Muschamp. Ivie has all the tools to become a very effective interior lineman but will need to polish up his technique, learn to play with his hands and become more consistent.

Ivie got off to a good start by enrolling early and impressing his head coach with his approach to he game but I think he will see very limited playing time this season. Ivie will develop into a productive player for the Gators and he could eventually become a starter down the road.

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